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scent as koera as it pointer seeking out his poli. The

political nolions of ExBTEN JACKSON canEtical parties, and with a writtea stanchuenit imut be mistsaloon. Under the ariful disguise of

whicilie lugs about in his breeches pocket, la- elevating men most conspicuous for their probiboring to complice then that he and his spoilety, zitue, &c. he is lend epon the destruction of can cy, shull and will be electeil 19 of lerepublican party --Ilia licen und

They neexi only be read and reflected in by Ola, mokestis on the diffidence of true mers republicans to be discovered to be altogether it! What looks Washington and Cincinnatus unreal and worse than visionary. They ini ke a Wild at lave beert, to wait to be called into pub- mockery of the lives and conduct of such mnen lic service, which such great men, such disin- as JETFERSUS and MADISON. Ib. terested politicians as the Kanderhook statesman They believe the exertions of all the great and Condescends to preambulate the country and is tuous men who have all along advocated and work, our yotes by the rule of three, in their extended the doctrines of the republican par. own lavor! We have some amongst us who ty. --consider it honor enough to serve under such a chies, but thanks to the intelligence and grad The RIGDOX EXCURER'S OPINION OF Am sense of the age, thes are few, and are doin

TIEW LACKSON i slunvendly.

* We cannot consent to lend a hand towaris Ilie little inan, with his characteristic rapidi- tlic election of such a man ay Andrew Jackson. ty of movements, darts mto the offices of lus - Richmond Enquirer. friends the office holders, draws out his paper u We would deprecate his election as a curse of majorities, demonstrates his own election, upon our emuntry -- Ib. tells them their offices depend on tlle success of * One, who on any great crisis, would convert 3

the ticket-thie masonic institution depends on the whole country to on greul camp-and a fost it - the safety of those interested in our State would reduce almost every thing under martial

books depend on it--the safety of your twenty law. --ih.
per cent shavers depends ba

ans General Jackson's friends petend to say kendaal ankl dear Mirs. Baton depend on it. He that he is equal to Washington Wiren they tells them what strings to touch on: what stories modestly lay chim to such a pratension, it will it will do to publish in one county and what in be time enough to answer them. _LIG. another. In one county a Hemiboard murder * Compare him with Adams and Crawfo d, story is to be sarted, in anothies, it story that and how to masthe be...the anti masonry is sold out to Chy, andiu a third, ** We can commend General Jackson's mothat the Clay men are all bartered away to an- desty in retirirg from the Senate and the ti-masonry! Having given out his orders, the benen, where he discovered the superior quaTotle dapper man thrusts the small light head, lifications of other people. Can we say ax much and is of'm a twinkling, to inspire new hopes, for his mudesty, wlien Belis now aspiring to the ad new counts and batch new intrigues in highest office in this nation :--15. a new place.

He is a distinguished soldier--but is be a

Matemia Where is the evidence of it? PROSL THE COUNT AXI) ENQUINH.

where are his political speeches ? his des. MEMENTOS

patches his essays? his measures? Where Ties ALITANT Ansts' OPINION OF ANDRZW are the evidences of that skill and attainment TACKSON

in polities to which a life of souly and expeThe fact is ckar that Mister Jackson its not a riduce is so essentially necessary 2016, single foeling in common with the RepoblicuaHe is too little of a slabosman-tog rash pronto The reverse of that he desires, and too violehi in vs temper-his measures too much nukes the merit of desining, the futul extinction inclined to arbitrary gwernment to obtain the

drumble sap port of the attor of this papen." It is idle is this Stale, however it may be in 76. others, to strise enan for a moderate support of It has long been inaintained as a maxim, Wo Jukson. It is voly out of the question that the man who cannot obuy ouglit not to as as the roles of New York lite in it. Inde. command and the rule in the present case pendently of the disclosures of his political opi- stands upon the sound reason, that the man who Bionon dhe male nuk be the replies candidato makes his own will and pleasure the sole rule The scored as a gallant solidier, but he stands and guide on all as ought not to be in the minds of the people of this site at an immested with the Targe powgis of the President neerudele distance from the Executive chair. -- of the United States, ION

General Jackson, it seems always thought IL BITS, aside from his politics are quite Me. Madison was out the trust of men, and a o srdLLI

pred collian, bat ha did prefer him as a The course apteil by Mrockson is fool President, because he canonys believed that and saitent to the fuels and so narty men. the mind of a phone could not dwell on This pleasant wall who are the destruction blood with any composite of course, that he of the dembenitie party. They will every was not well itieel in stormy sen. The lies when uploud as the rive prachlit non eslin this da utoke ol'the pencil, draws TAGSETE TILL AUDHU or dare which ate hielown character. Wat is continually Aoating so well intended for musiD SERVICE. - I. before his eyes. The man who can view blood

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We have given to General Jackson every
vote that we believe he will receive; unless
he receives the votes of Maine 10, New Hamp
shire 7, Alissouri 4, and Indinna 9; these States

give 30 votes, which added to 83, give him I
but 115 votes, being 39 less than a majority.

Tristius apparent that Gen. Jackson will not
be elected by the electoral college Let net
see how it will be in the Honse of Representat
tives. If the question comes before tlie House,
wyd all the candidates are voted for the vote
mat be set down as follows:

Por lackson, certain New Hampshire, Virgi-
ma, N. Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi.
Tennessee, and Illinois, eight States.

For Clas-Massachusetts, Connecticut, News
Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, and Louisiana,
and Kentucky, seven States,

For Wiri-Vermont, Pennsylvania, Rhode
Island, three States.

Leaving Maine, New York, South Carolina,
Ohio, Missouri, and Indians, six States doubtful.

We put down Maine as a doubtful State, le.
cause the vote in the House will be given to
General Jackson, if he can be elected thereby
And we put down New York also a19 a doubtful
State, because Mr. Vayi Buren's partisans hold
the vote of that State, in the House. We pute
down Olio, Missouri, and Indiana, as doubtful, sa
bechise we believe the vote in the House will te
depend upon their electoral votes. If these el
States vote for General Jackson, then will he v
receive the votes of their representatives. We a
put down Illinois for Jackson for the same rea
son. We put down South Carolina as doubt.
ful. Because we do not believe that she will
vote for Clay or Jackson.

It will thus be seen, that whilst General fack su san's presses are clamorous against bringing the up

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dection into the House, his only chance of re- si plection rests on the rote of his partisans in the to House; and that he cannot be elected there, if oh he loses the votes of two of the doubtful States of and that his re election will depend upon the tak Fotc of South Carolma; if he loses the vote of in either Maine, New York, Ohio, Missouri

, or In- of
diana.

Can Mr. Clay be elected by the House vot
This will depend upon

the electoral votes of cer
Maine, Olio, Missouri

, and Indians, and upon that de representatives from the States voting for Wir Mr. Wirt. Should Ohio, Missouri, and Indiana vise

vote for Mr. Clay, or against Gen Jackson, the
depresentatives of those states will vote either as in

Iar Mr. Clay or for Mr. Wirt; and three of the hold
dubtful States, added to 7 certain for Mr. Clay
Clas, and the 3 anti-muasonic States, will make non
an election by the House. But should Ohio, en a
Mine, Missouri, and Indiana, vote against Mr tra
Chy, he cannot be elected by the lose, even that
The should receive the votes of Vermont, wish
Pennsylvania, md Rhode Island. Should any bear
two of all the Statex put down as doubtful, or disge
asing for Mr. Wist, vote for Mr. Clay, then have
South Carolina will control the election,

But let us glance at Mr. Wirt's prospects. If party
he receive the votes of Rhode Island, 4. Ver- ung
mont, 1; New York, 4); Pemalvamaa 80; putar
Oma, ll; this will be 104; South Carolina 11, whic

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We have given to General Jackson every will be 115. Can Mr. Clay's friends give him vote that we believe he will receive; unless 30 votes? If so, he may be elected by the peo

le receives the votes of Maine 10, New Hamp ple. Massachusetts gives 14, Connecticut 8, Tab shire 7. Alissouri 4, and Indinma 9; these States New Jersey 8, Delaware 3, and Maryland 7.

give 30 votes, which added to 83, give him Here are 40 votes admitted to be under the but 118 votes, being 32 less than a majority. control of Mr. Clay's friends, and if the ques

It is thus apparent that Gen. Jackson will nottion of Wirt or Jackson is presented to them, be elected by the electoral college. Let us there can be no hesitation in supposing that sec how it will be in the House of Representa- they would vote for Mr. Wirt. tives. If the question comes before the Honse, It is completely in the power of Mr. Clay's and all the candidates are voted for, the rote friends, by uniting in support of Mr Wirt, to may be set down as follows:

elect him by the people, without a single vote For Jackson, certain New Hampshire, Virgi- from Maine, N. Hampshire, Kentucky, Louisinia, N. Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi. ana, Missouri, Illinois, or Indiana. Will they Tennessee, and Illinois, eight States.

do so, or will they assume the responsibility of For Clay--Massachusetts, Connecticut, New re-electing Gen. Jackson This is a question Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, and Louisiana, for them to decide; it belongs not to us to adand Kentucky, seven States.

vise or to dictate. It is well known that, alFor Wirt-Vermont, Penngylvania, Rhode though we prefer Mr. Wirt to either Clay Island, three States,

or Jackson, he is not our choice. Yet, we Leaving Maine, New York, South Carolina, are by no means certain that is not a strong Ohio, Missouri, and Indiana, six States doubtful. recommendation: he will come in, if he does

We put down Maine as a doubtful State, be- come into the Presidency, unpledged. He is cause the vote in the House will be given to committed to none of the ultra parties. He has General Jackson, if he can

be elected thereby. no warm partisans to put up nor has he any And we put down New York also as a doubt'ul bitter enemies to put down. He seems to preState, because Mr. Van Buren's partisans hold sent a rallying point, around which the various the vote of that State, in the House. We put elements can unite without a sacrifice of perdown Ohio, Missouri, and Indiana, as doubtful, sonal feeling, or of any of the great public inbecause we believe the vote in the House will terests upon which parties have divided. His depend upon their electoral votes. If these election will put an end to the reign of Martin

States vote for General Jackson, then will he Van Buren, Amos Kendall, Wm. B. Lewis, El receive the votes of their representatives. We and Company, and, we humbly believe, will 15 put down Illinois for Jackson for the same rea- greatly contribute to allay that deep party ex

son. We put down South Carolina as doubt, citement, which so unhappily threatens the veful, because we do not believe that she will ry foundation of our institutions. vote for Clay or Jackson.

Will Mr Clay and his friends unite in the It will thus be seen, that whilst General Sack- support of Mr. Wirt? This, no doubt, depends son's presses are clamoroits against bringing the upon their opinion of Mr. Clay's chances of election into the House, his only chance of re- success. No one can expect Mr. Clay's friends election rests on the vote of his partisans in the to relinquish the high prize, so long tlre House; and that he cannot be elected there, if object of their solicitude, while he has hopes he lases the votes of two of the doubtful States; of obtaining it. But the electoral elections and that his re-election will depend upon the take place early in November; the colleges meet vote of South Carolina, if he loses the vote of in their respective States on the first Wednesday either Maine, New York, Ohio, Missouri, or In- of December. There is full time for Sir. Clay diana.

and his friends to know the fate of the electoral Can Mr. Clay be elected by the House ? vote before these colleges meet; and if he asThis will depend upon the electoral votes of certains that he cannot be elected himself, and Maine, Ohio, Missouri, and Indiana, and upon that the votes of his friends, if given to Mr. the representatives from the States voting for Wirt, will elect him, he cannot hesitate to ad. Mr. Wirt. Should Ohio, Missouri, and Indiana vise them to do so. vote for Mr. Clay, or against Gen. Jackson, the We feel the delicacy of our position. Except representatives of those States will vote either as members of the great anti-Jackson party, we

for Mr. Clay or for Mr. Wirt, and three of the hold but few opinions in common with Mr. doubtful States, added to 7 certain for Mr. Clay and his party. Except, as such, we have Clay, and the S anti-masonic States, will make no right to be heard by them. They have takan election by the House. But should Ohio, en an active part in the circulation of our ExMaine, Missouri, and Indiana, vote against Mr tra Telegraph, and some of them may suppose Clay, he cannot be clected by the House, even that these remarks are dictated more by our in he should receive the votes of Vermont, wishes than by our judgment. Such should Pennsylvania, and Rhode Island. Should any bear in mentory, that altãough we never have two of all the States put down as doubtful, or disguised our preference for Mr. Wirt, we as voting for Mr. Wirt, vote for Mr. Clay, then have, in our Extra, carefully avoided every South Carolina will control the election. thing to which Mr. Clay and his friends, as a

But let us glance at Mr. Wirt's prospects. If party, could take exceptions, and that, by dohe receives the votes of Rhode Island, 4, Ver- ang so, we have subjected ourselves to thefimmont, 7: New York, 42: Pennsylvania: 30; putation of unworthy motives. In the premises Ohio, 21; this will be 104; South Carolina 11, which we now present, we do not advise Mr.

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