The Life of the Rt. Hon. Canning

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Harper & Brothers, 1846 - 363 sider

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Side 322 - If France occupied Spain, was it necessary, in order to avoid the consequences of that occupation — that we should blockade Cadiz ? No. I looked another way — I sought materials of compensation in another hemisphere. Contemplating Spain, such as our ancestors had known her, I resolved that if France had Spain, it should not be Spain " with the Indies" I called the New World into existence, to redress the balance of the Old.
Side 117 - Give me the avowed, the erect, the manly foe, Bold I can meet — perhaps may turn his blow ; But of all plagues, good heaven, thy wrath can send, Save, save, oh ! save me from the candid friend...
Side 158 - Tell him I am now quite well — quite recovered from my illness ; but what has he not to answer for who is the cause of my having been ill at all?
Side 325 - In matters of commerce, the fault of the Dutch Is giving too little and asking too much ; With equal advantage the French are content, So we'll clap on Dutch bottoms a twenty per cent.
Side 244 - You well know, Gentlemen, how soon one of those stupendous masses, now reposing on their shadows in perfect stillness — how soon, upon any call of patriotism or of necessity, it would assume the likeness of an animated thing, instinct with life and motion, how soon it would ruffle, as it were, its swelling plumage, how quickly it would put forth all its beauty and its bravery, collect its scattered elements of strength, and awaken its dormant thunder.
Side 122 - I should be glad to drink your Honour's health in A pot of beer, if you will give me sixpence; But for my part, I never love to meddle With politics, sir.
Side 122 - Story? God bless you! I have none to tell, sir: Only last night a-drinking at the Chequers, This poor old hat and breeches, as you see, were Torn in a scuffle. Constables came up for to take me into Custody; they took me before the justice; Justice Oldmixon put me in the parish Stocks for a vagrant.
Side 84 - Rouse all the marquis within me! exclaims the earl, and the peerage never turned forth a more undaunted champion in its cause than I shall prove. Stain my green riband blue, cries out the illustrious knight, and the fountain of honour will have a fast and faithful servant!
Side 10 - Thy virtue, and my woe, no words can tell; Therefore a little while, my George, farewell ! For faith and love like ours, heaven has in store Its last best gift — to meet and part no more.
Side 121 - Who in their coaches roll along the turnpikeRoad, what hard work 'tis crying all day, "Knives and Scissors to grind O!" Tell me, knife-grinder, how came you to grind knives? Did some rich man tyrannically use you? Was it the squire? or parson of the parish? Or the attorney? Was it the squire for killing of his game? or Covetous parson for his tithes distraining? Or roguish lawyer made you lose your little All in a lawsuit? (Have you not read the Rights of Man, by Tom Paine?) Drops of compassion tremble...

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