The heart of Mid-Lothian

Forside
Archibald Constable, 1818 - 375 sider

Inni boken

Hva folk mener - Skriv en omtale

Vi har ikke funnet noen omtaler på noen av de vanlige stedene.

Utvalgte sider

Andre utgaver - Vis alle

Vanlige uttrykk og setninger

Populære avsnitt

Side 270 - All school-days' friendship, childhood innocence? We, Hermia, like two artificial gods, Have with our needles created both one flower, Both on one sampler, sitting on one cushion, Both warbling of one song, both in one key; As if our hands, our sides...
Side 99 - I am judging,' said Mr. Plumdamas, 'that this reprieve wadna stand gude in the auld Scots law, when the kingdom was a kingdom.' 'I dinna ken muckle about the law,' answered Mrs. Howden; 'but I ken, when we had a king, and a chancellor, and parliamentmen o' our ain, we could aye peeble them wi' stanes when they werena gude bairns — But naebody's nails can reach the length o
Side 52 - Whoe'er's been at Paris must needs know the Greve, The fatal retreat of the unfortunate brave, Where honour and justice most oddly contribute, To ease heroes' pains by an halter and gibbet.
Side 134 - With treble walls, which Phlegethon surrounds, Whose fiery flood the burning empire bounds, And, pressed betwixt the rocks, the bellowing noise resounds. Wide is the fronting gate, and raised on high With adamantine columns threats the sky ; Vain is the force of man, and heaven's as vain, To crush the pillars which the pile sustain.
Side 204 - Reuben and Rachel, though as fond as doves, Were yet discreet and cautious in their loves; Nor would attend to Cupid's wild commands, Till cool reflection bade them join their hands: When both were poor, they thought it argued ill Of hasty love to make them poorer still...
Side 181 - But as the path gently circles around the base of the cliffs, the prospect, composed as it is of these enchanting and sublime objects, changes at every step, and presents them blended with, or divided from each other, in every possible variety which can gratify the eye and the imagination.
Side 180 - IF I were to choose a spot from which the rising or setting sun could be seen to the greatest possible advantage, it would be that wild path winding around the foot of the high belt of semicircular rocks, called Salisbury Crags, and marking the verge of the steep descent which slopes down into the glen on the south-eastern side of the city of Edinburgh.
Side 17 - Atlantic wave ? Is India free ? and does she wear her plumed And jewelled turban with a smile of peace, Or do we grind her still? The grand debate, The popular harangue, the tart reply, The logic, and the wisdom, and the wit, And the loud laugh — I long to know them all ; I burn to set the imprisoned wranglers free, And give them voice and utterance once again.
Side 178 - Majesty, in the height of her displeasure, told the celebrated John, Duke of Argyle, that, sooner than submit to such an insult, she would make Scotland a hunting-field. "In that case, Madam," answered that high-spirited nobleman, with a profound bow, " I will take leave of your Majesty, and go down to my own country to get my hounds ready.
Side 35 - Is drawn away with such distracted speed, That she anticipates a dreadful deed. Not so do I — Let solid walls impound The captive fair, and dig a moat around ; Let there be brazen locks and bars of steel, And keepers cruel, such as never feel ; With not a single note the purse supply, And when she begs, let men and maids deny ; Be windows...

Bibliografisk informasjon