The Poetical Works of William Cowper: With a Memoir, Volum 1

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Houghton, Mifflin, 1854

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Side 420 - There's not a chain That hellish foes confederate for his harm Can wind around him, but he casts it off ', With as much ease as Samson his green withes. He looks abroad into the varied field Of nature, and though poor perhaps compared With those whose mansions glitter in his sight, 740 Calls the delightful scenery all his own.
Side 260 - Stop thief! stop thief! — a highwayman! Not one of them was mute; And all and each that passed that way Did join in the pursuit. And now the turnpike gates again Flew open in short space; The toll-men thinking as before That Gilpin rode a race.
Side 255 - Well done !" As loud as he could bawl. Away went Gilpin — who but he ? His fame soon spread around, "He carries weight; he rides a race! 'Tis for a thousand pound!
Side 258 - Ah, luckless speech, and bootless boast ! For which he paid full dear; For, while he spake, a braying ass Did sing most loud and clear; Whereat his horse did snort, as he Had heard a lion roar, And galloped off with all his might, As he had done before.
Side 25 - E'en on the fools that trampled on their laws. But he (his musical finesse was such, So nice his ear, so delicate his touch) Made poetry a mere mechanic art; And every warbler has his tune by heart.
Side 255 - Until he came unto the Wash Of Edmonton so gay ; And there he threw the wash about On both sides of the way, Just like unto a trundling mop, Or a wild goose at play. At Edmonton his loving wife From the balcony spied Her tender husband, wondering much To see how he did ride. Stop, stop, John Gilpin I — Here's the house, They all at once did cry ; The dinner waits, and we are tired...
Side 314 - Would I describe a preacher, such as Paul, Were he on Earth, would hear, approve, and own, Paul should himself direct me. I would trace His master-strokes, and draw from his design. I would express him simple, grave, sincere ; In doctrine uncorrupt; in language plain, And plain in manner; decent, solemn, chaste And natural in gesture...
Side 213 - And your lordship, he said, will undoubtedly find, That the Nose has had spectacles always in wear, Which amounts to possession time out of mind. Then, holding the spectacles up to the court — Your lordship observes they are made with a straddle, As wide as the ridge of the Nose is, in short, Design'd to sit close to it, just like a saddle.
Side 337 - Been hurt by th' archers. In his side he bore, And in his hands and feet, the cruel scars. With gentle force soliciting the darts, . He drew them forth, and heal'd and bade me live. Since then, with few associates, in remote And silent woods I wander, far from those My former partners of the peopled scene ; With few associates, and not wishing more. Here much I ruminate, as much I may, With other views of men and manners now Than once, and others of a life to come...
Side 262 - Their real interest to discern : That brother should not war with brother, And worry and devour each other, But sing and shine by sweet consent, Till life's poor transient night is spent, Respecting in each other's case The gifts of nature and of grace. Those Christians best deserve the name, Who studiously make peace their aim ; Peace, both the duty and the prize Of him that creeps and him that flies.

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