The Many Tongues of Literacy

Forside
Popular Press, 1992 - 210 sider

Statistics indicate that more than half the population of America is illiterate or subliterate in the conventional sense, but very literate in other media such as television, sports, and leisure time activities. But statistics can lie or tell only half a fact. Since the languages of literacy are constantly expanding and developing, it is time that American educators, and the public in general, reexamine their definitions of literacy and the media in which we need to be literate. Therefore, educators must redefine literacy if they are to be realistic about its sources, uses, and values. The need is vital to a developing world.

 

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Innhold

Introduction
1
Understanding the Babel
9
Medicine for Illiteracy
28
Redefining the Humanities
44
Academic SnakeOil
54
Art The Premier Language Problem
73
New Worlds in Literature
88
Literacy Through Popular Fiction
96
The Phony Issue of TV Esthetics
118
Illiteracy About the Illiterate
127
Literacy in Interdisciplinary Academic Organizations
141
The Expanding World of Literacy
155
Reading Below the Surface
181
Windshield No RearView Mirror
194
Notes
196
Works Cited
198

Ross Macdonald Or The Need for the Oath of Macdonald
110

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Om forfatteren (1992)

Ray Browne was born in Millport, Alabama, in 1922, and was educated at the University of Alabama, Columbia University, and the University of California at Los Angeles. As founder of the Popular Culture Association (1970) and of the Department of Popular Culture at Bowling Green University. Browne was an early advocate of applying serious study to popular culture. Roy B. Browne died on October 22, 2009.

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