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Mr. Johnson

487
Mr. Calhoun

492
Mr. Randolph

496
Mr. Calhoun

502
Messrs. Randolph, Bleecker

503
Mr. Grundy

504
Mr. Wright

509
Debate on the Naval Establishment.

.
Mr. Lloyd's speech, in the Senate

511
Mr. Crawford

527
Debate relative to the War Department.
Mr. Grundy's speech, in the House

550
Mr. D. R. Williams

542
Mr. Troup

545
Mr. Harper

548
Mr. Johnson

550
Mr. Randolph

552
Mr. Tallmadge

355
Mr. M'Kim

558
Mr. Wright

559
President's message, proposing war

561
Manifesto of the committee on foreign relations

567
Act of Congress declaring war

578
Proclamation of the President

573
Yeas and nays in the Senate and House

574
Mr. Harper's speech on the bill for raising an additional army - 575
Correspondence between Mr. Monroe and Mr. Foster, and
Mr. Monroe and Mr. Russell

581
6ecret Journal, relative to war

593
Correspondence between Mr. Monroe and Mr. Foster, relative
to the French docrees

597
Correspondence on the orders in council

612
Mr. Calhoun's speech on the proposition to repeal the non-
importation act

612
M1. Bibb's speech on the treasury note bill

627
List of Acts

631

ORATION,

DELIVERED

IN THE HALL

OF THE

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES,

AT THE CAPITOL, WASHINGTON,

JULY 4, 1812.

BY RICHARD RUSH, ESQ

WASHIYGTON....PRINTED :

RE-PRINTED, CONCORD, N. II.

BY ISAAC AND WALTER R. HILL

1812.

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S

ENSIBLY as I feel, fellow citizens, the honor of having been

selected to address you on such an occasion as this, I am not less sensible of the difficulties of the task. Not that there is any thing intrinsically arduous in a celebration, in this form, of the most brilliant political anniversary of the world; but as the subject has been repeatedly exhibited, under so many points of view, I am apprehensive of tiring, without being able to requite, the attention with which you may be good cnough to honor my endeavors. The fruitful subject must still sustain me, and I proceed, with unfeigned diffidence, and the most profound respect for this distinguished and enlightened assembly, to perform the office assigned me.*

During each return of this day for nearly thirty successive years, our country rested in all the security and all the blessings of peace. But the scene and the aspect are changed. The menacing front of Waris before us to awaken our solicitudes, to demand at the hands of each citizen of the republic the most active energies of duty; to ask, if need be, the largest sacrifices of advantage and of ease. The tranquillity, the repose, the enjoyments, the schemes, the hopes of peace, are, for a while, no more. These, with their endearing concomitants, are to give place to the stronger and more agitating passions, to the buey engagements, to the solemn and anxious thoughts, to the trials, to the sufferings, that follow in the train of war.

Man, in his individual nature, becomes virtuous by constant struggles against his own imperfections. His intellectual cminence, which puts him at the head of created beings, is attained also by long toil, and painful self denials, bringing with them, but too often, despondence to his mind, and hazards to his frame. It would seem to be a law of his existence, that great enjoyment is only to be obtained as the reward of great exertion. " She shall go to a wealthy place," but her way shall be “ through fire and through water.” It seems the irreversible lot of nations, that their permanent well being is to be achieved also through severe probations. Their origin is often in agony and blood, and their safety to be maintained only by constant vigilance, by arduous efforts, by a willingness to encounter" danger and by actually and frequently braving it. Their prosperity, their rights, their liberties,

The President of the United States, Heads of Department, members of Con gress, &c. as well as citizens and strangers, were present at the delivery of this discourse.

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