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the teeth of a saw; dancette differs from the former by ways, between two mullets or.” The bend is said to be having the teeth deeper; dove-tail, a line which resem subject to all the accidental forms of lines, and has three bles the dove-tail joints of the joiners.

diminutives, namely, the garter, which is half the bend; Partition Lines. Partition Lines are such as divide the the cost, or cottise, which is half the garter; and the

shield into two or more parts, which are distinguished into ribbon, which is half the cost. [vide Bend] When the
party per pale, when the field is divided by a perpen field contains more than one bend, they are not called
dicular line, as fig. 18; party per fesse, when the field is bends, but bendlets, or more generally bendy, of so many
equally divided by a horizontal line, as fig. 19; party per pieces, as fig. 25, Plate No. II (39), “ Bendy of six, or
bend, a field divided by a diagonal line from the dexter and azure ;" and when opposite to one another in metal
chief to the sinister base, as fig. 20; party per chevron, is and colour, they are said to be counter-changed.
a field divided by two half diagonal lines rising from the Bend Sinister. The Bend Sinister, which is the bar of the
dexter and sinister base flanks, and meeting in the collar French, is the same in form as the bend or the bend
point of the field, as fig. 21; party per cross, or quarterly, dexter, but it is drawn across the field from the sinister
is when the field is divided by two lines, one perpendi chief to the dexter base, as fig. 27, Plate No. I. The
cular and one horizontal, as in fig. 22 ; party per saltire, bend sinister is divided into the scarpe, or scarfe, which
is when the two partition lines, party per bend, dexter contains the half of the bend, and the batune, which is a
and sinister, meet in the centre of the field, as fig. 23. fourth part of the bend sinister. This is borne couped,
Figures. Figures are the next essential parts of armories, and is vulgarly known by the name of the bend of

which are to be divided into Ordinaries, Charges, and bastardy, because it is the mark of illegitimacy.
Differences.

Fesse. The Fesse is an honourable ordinary which occuOrdinaries. Ordinaries are figures so called, because they pies the third middle of the field, as in fig. 28. The

are in ordinary use in this science. They are otherwise fesse is said to surmount another figure when it lies over called proper figures, because they are proper to the it, and in the same manner to be surmounted by it, as heraldic art. They are distinguished into honourable fig. 22, Plate No. II (39); but when the supercharge is ordinaries and sub-ordinaries, or less honourable ordina comprehended within the limits of the fesse, it is said to ries.

be a fesse charged, or to be on a fesse. When the fesse Honourable Ordinaries. Honourable ordinaries, otherwise is placed higher than the centre, it is said to be trans

called simply ordinaries, are so named because they are posed; and when below the centre, it is abaissé. In often given by emperors, kings, and princes, as addi respect to the form of the lines, the fesse is wavy, as tions of honour to armorial bearings. They are nine in fig. 17, Plate No. II (39), “ Argent, a fesse wavy, gules, number, namely, the Chief, Pale, Bend, Bend Sinister, betwixt three boars' heads erased, sable ;nebulé, as Fesse, Bar, Chevron, Cross, and Saltire.

fig. 18, Plate No. Il (39), “ Argent, a fesse nebulé between Chief. The chief is formed by a horizontal line, and con three escutcheons, gules ;" indented, as fig. 21, Plate

tains in depth the third of the upper part of the field, as No. II (39), “ Vert, a fesse indented, ermine between a
fig. 24, argent a chief gules.By one of the rules of buck's head cabossed in chief, and two escalops, or;"
blazon, when a chief is in a coat of arms it is the last dancette, as fig. 22, Plate No. II (39), “ Azure, a fesse
thing to be mentioned, except when it is surrounded with dancette surmounted of a little cross argent ;" so the
a bordure. When the chief is charged with any figure, fesse crenelle, chequé interposed, couped, voided, 8c.
this is said in blazon to be on a chief; but when natural [vide Fesse ]
and artificial things are placed in the upper part of the Bar. The Bar is an honourable ordinary which is formed
shield, in the place of the chief, they are said to be in after the manner of a fesse, but occupies only a fifth of
chief. [vide Chief] The chief is formed of crooked the field, and is not confined to any particular part of the
as well as straight lines, and is therefore distinguished field, except when there is only one bar, when it is put in

into the chief crenelle, chief dancette, &c. [vide Chief ] the place of a fesse. Bars are mostly two in a field, some-
Pale. The pale occupies the third middle part of the times three and more, as fig. 29, Plate No. I; “ Argent,

field perpendicularly, as fig. 25. The pale is charged two bars, gules, surmounted of as many serpents nowed, with things which are said to be on a pale ; and and affronté in pale azure.When the field is filled when things are borne perpendicularly one above with bars they are said to be barry, as “ Barry of four, another in the centre of the shield, they are said to be six pieces argent and azure, &c.” When small figures are in pale, as in fig. 24, Plate No. II. (39). The pale has ranged horizontally above or below the middle of the two diminutives, namely, the pallet, which is the half of shield they are then said to be in bar, or barways ; and the pale; and the endorse, which is the fourth of the when the bar does not touch the sides of the shield it is pallet ; and when the field is divided into four or more said to be couped. The diminutives of the bar are the even parts, by perpendicular lines of two different tinc closet, which is the half of the bar, and the barulet, tures interchangeably disposed, it is said to be paly of which is the half of the closet: when these diminutives so many pieces, as fig. 23, Plate No. II (39), “ Paly of are placell two and two in a shield they are called bars six argent and gules. The pale is also subject to the gemel. (vide Bar] The bar is sometimes subject to accidental forms of lines, namely, ingrailed, as in fig. 15, the accidental forms of lines, as imbattled, ingrailed, &c. Plate No. II (39), “ Or, a pale ingrailed sable," and in Chevron. The Chevron is an honourable ordinary, made vecked, fig. 16, “ Gules, a pale invecked argent,&c. of the bend dexter and sinister, issuing from the right [vide Pale]

and left base points of the escutcheon meeting and end. Bend. The bend is an ordinary drawn diagonally from ing pyramidically in the collar point, as fig. 30, “ Argent,

the dexter chief to the sinister base, in the form of a a chevron, gules.It occupies, according to the French, belt, and occupies the third of the field, as fig. 26. A a third of the field ; but according to the English, the bend is said to surmount when it lies over other ordina fifth. The chevron is subject to very many accidental ries or other figures, keeping its just length or breadth ; forms, for it is accompanied with, or charged with, other and things are said to be on a bend when the bend is figures, and is also imbattled, as in fig. 19, Plate No. II charged with them; in bend, and bendways, when they (39), « Parted per chevron, embattled, vert and gules, are situated after the manner of a bend, as in fig. 26, three crows, argent ;” so, likewise, couped, abaissed, &c. Plate No. II (39), “ Gules, # two-handed sword, bend (vide Chevron] When any figures are situated in a

VOL. II.

H

represent certain planets, stones, and virtues, as set forth in the following table:

Blazonry. Blazonry is the explication of arms in apt and significant

terms. Arms are to be considered as to their different

kinds and their parts. Kinds of Arms. Arms are divisible into--Arms of domi

nion, belonging to princes, as ensigns of their power, which are stamped on their coins.- Arms of pretension, those which are borne by sovereigns not in possession of the dominions to which such coats belong, as the arms of France formerly borne by English Kings.- Arms of community, those of bishoprics, cities, &c.- Assumptive arms, such as a man may of his proper right assume with the consent of his sovereign.- Arms of patronage, belonging to lords of manors, patrons of benefices, &c.Arms of succession, or feudal arms, taken by those who inherit fiefs, &c.-Arms of alliance, those which are taken by the issue of marriage with an heiress, to show their descent paternal and maternal.- Arms of adoption, arms paternal, arms of concession, canting arms, fc.

[vide Arms] Parts of arms. The parts of arms are, the escutcheon,

tinctures, furs, lines, and figures. Escutcheon. The escutcheon, or shield, represents the

original shield used in war, and on which arms were anciently borne. The surface of the escutcheon is termed the field, because it contains those marks of honour which were formerly acquired in the field. The forms of the shield were of different kinds, namely, triangular, as in fig. 1, Plate No. I. (38); notched and indented, called a shield-chancre, as fig. 2; oval, which is called a lozenge, and used by females, as fig. 3; and the square form, as in fig. 4, which is in ordinary use at present. The shield is likewise distinguished not only by the variety of its forms, but also of its position, some being borne erect and others pendant, some hanging by the right and others by the left corner. To the escutcheon belong points and abatements. The points of the escutcheon are certain points which are peculiarly distinguished for the location of the figures which the field contains. These points are distinguished by the first - nine letters of the alphabet, as in fig. 5, which are as

follow : namely, A B C, the chief, which represents the highest and most

honourable part of the shield. A is the dexter chief; B,

the middle chief; and C, the sinister chief. D, the collar, or honour point, so called because eminent

men wear badges of honour about their necks. E, the cour, or heart, otherwise called the centre or fesse

point. F, the nombril, or navel point. GHI, the base, i, e. G, the dexter base ; H, the middle

base ; and I, the sinister base. The French call the two first the flanques, and the last the base. The use of these points is to difference coats of arms charged with the same figures; for arms having a lion in chief differ from those having a lion in base ; and so on with the

other points. Abatements. Abatements are certain marks of disgrace added to the coat armour of divers persons on sundry occasions, which have been distinguished by different names, as delf, inescutcheon reversed, point-parted dexter, point in point, point champagne, plain point, gore, gusset, and escutcheon reversed; but of all these abatements there is no example remaining except of the last. [vide

Abatement] Tinctures. Tinctures, or armorial colours, are altogether

nine, namely, two metals and seven colours, which have been distinguished by different names, and made to

Colours. Tinctures. Precious Stones. Planets.

Virtues. Yellow Or Topaz Sol

Faith White Argent Pearl

Luna

Innocence Blue

Azure Sapphire Jupiter Loyalty
Red
Gules Ruby Mars

Magnanimity
Black
Sable Diamond Saturn

Prudence
Green
Vert Emerald Venus

Love Purple Purpure Amethyst Mercury Temperance Tenny Tenney Hyacinth Dragon's Head Joy Blood-colour Sanguine Sardonix Dragon's Tail Fortitude The two first of the above tinctures are the metals, and the seven others the colours, of which the two last are not so frequently used in blazon as the rest.

When not given in their natural colours they are represented now in engraving by points and hatched lines, in the place of letters, which were formerly employed, as follow : namely-Or, Gold, distinguished by small spots, as fig. 6, formerly by the letter 0.- Argent, Silver, a white colour, formerly marked by the letter A, now represented by leaving the space blank, as fig. 7.- Azure, Blue, formerly represented by the letter B, now by horizontal or thwart hatches, as fig. 8.-Gules, Red, formerly distinguished by the letter R, now by perpendicular hatched lines, as fig. 9.-Sable, i. e. "Black, formerly marked by the letter S, now by cross hatches, perpendicular and horizontal lines, as fig. 10.-Vert, i. e. Green, formerly known by the letter V, now by thwart or diagonal hatches from right to left, as fig. 11.-Purple, formerly distinguished by the letter P, now by thwart or diagonal hatches from left to

right, as fig. 12. Furrs. Furrs are a sort of tincture which are composed

of two or more tinctures, and are supposed to represent the skins of beasts that were employed for the furring, doubling, and lining of robes and garments of state; whence they have been transferred to the coat armours themselves. The two principal furrs are ermine and vair.-Ermine is represented by a white field powdered, or semé, of black spots, as fig. 13. When the field is black with white spots it is denominated ermines, to which may be added other varieties, as erminois, a field or, with black spots; pean, a black field with white spots, or, &c.—Vair is always composed of argent and azure, represented by figures of small escutcheons, ranged in a line, so that the base argent is opposite to the base azure, as fig. 14. When the bells or cups of the same colour are placed base against base and point against point, it is called countervair, as fig. 15; and when the pieces of vair be of other tinctures, they are denominated vairy, as vairy of gules and or. To these two principal furrs may be added a third, called potent.Potent, otherwise called Counterpotent, is a sort of furr, which derives its name from the resemblance which the figures bear to crutch-heads, called potents, counter

placed, as in fig. 16. Lines. Lines serve to divide the shield into different

parts, and are denominated either crooked lines or partition lines.-Crooked lines serve to difference bearings, and are distinguished into the Ingrailed, Invecked, Wavy, Nebulé, Imbattled, Raguly, Indented, Dancette, Dove-Tail, as in fig. 17; ingrailed, is a line consisting of semicircles with the points turned upwards ; invecked, is a line of semicircles with the points turned downwards; wavy, a line formed after the manner of waves ; nebulé, so called because it represents a cloud; imbattled, or crenellé, is the name of a line which represents the battlements of a castle; raguly, represents the trunk of a tree with its branches cut off; indented, represents

the teeth of a saw; dancette differs from the former by ways, between two mullets or." The bend is said to be having the teeth deeper; dove-tail, a line which resem subject to all the accidental forms of lines, and has three bles the dove-tail joints of the joiners.

diminutives, namely, the garter, which is half the bend; Partition Lines. Partition Lines are such as divide the the cost, or cottise, which is half the garter; and the

shield into two or more parts, which are distinguished into ribbon, which is half the cost. [vide Bend] When the party per pale, when the field is divided by a perpen field contains more than one bend, they are not called dicular line, as fig. 18; party per fesse, when the field is bends, but bendlets, or more generally bendy, of so many equally divided by a horizontal line, as fig. 19; party per pieces, as fig. 25, Plate No. II (39), “ Bendy of six, or bend, a field divided by a diagonal line from the dexter and azure ;” and when opposite to one another in metal chief to the sinister base, as fig. 20; party per chevron, is

and colour, they are said to be counter-changed. a field divided by two half diagonal lines rising from the Bend Sinister. The Bend Sinister, which is the bar of the dexter and sinister base flanks, and meeting in the collar French, is the same in form as the bend or the bend point of the field, as fig. 21 ; party per cross, or quarterly, dexter, but it is drawn across the field from the sinister is when the field is divided by two lines, one perpendi chief to the dexter base, as fig. 27, Plate No. I. The cular and one horizontal, as in fig. 22; party per saltire, bend sinister is divided into the scarpe, or scarfe, which is when the two partition lines, party per bend, dexter contains the half of the bend, and the batune, which is a and sinister, meet in the centre of the field, as fig. 23. fourth part of the bend sinister. This is borne couped, Figures. Figures are the next essential parts of armories, and is vulgarly known by the name of the bend of

which are to be divided into Ordinaries, Charges, and bastardy, because it is the mark of illegitimacy. Differences.

Fesse. The Fesse is an honourable ordinary which occuOrdinaries. Ordinaries are figures so called, because they pies the third middle of the field, as in fig. 28. The

are in ordinary use in this science. They are otherwise fesse is said to surmount another figure when it lies over called proper figures, because they are proper to the it, and in the same manner to be surmounted by it, as heraldic art. They are distinguished into honourable fig. 22, Plate No. II (39); but when the supercharge is ordinaries and sub-ordinaries, or less honourable ordina comprehended within the limits of the fesse, it is said to ries.

be a fesse charged, or to be on a fesse. When the fesse Honourable Ordinaries. Honourable ordinaries, otherwise is placed higher than the centre, it is said to be trans

called simply ordinaries, are so named because they are posed; and when below the centre, it is abaissé. In often given by emperors, kings, and princes, as addi respect to the form of the lines, the fesse is wavy, as tions of honour to armorial bearings. They are nine in fig. 17, Plate No. II (39), “ Argent, a fesse wavy, gules, number, namely, the Chief, Pale, Bend, Bend Sinister, betwixt three boars' heads erased, sable ;" nebulé, as Fesse, Bar, Chevron, Cross, and Saltire.

fig. 18, Plate No. II (39), “ Argent, a fesse nebulé between Chief. The chief is formed by a horizontal line, and con three escutcheons, gules ;" indented, as fig. 21, Plate

tains in depth the third of the upper part of the field, as No. II (39), “ Vert, a fesse indented, ermine between a fig. 24, argent a chief gules." By one of the rules of buck's head cabossed in chief, and two escalops, or ;" blazon, when a chief is in a coat of arms it is the last dancette, as fig. 22, Plate No. II (39), “ Azure, a fesse thing to be mentioned, except when it is surrounded with dancette surmounted of a little cross argent ; " so the a bordure. When the chief is charged with any figure, fesse crenelle, chequé interposed, couped, voided, &c. this is said in blazon to be on a chief ; but when natural [vide Fesse] and artificial things are placed in the upper part of the Bar. The Bar is an honourable ordinary which is formed shield, in the place of the chief, they are said to be in after the manner of a fesse, but occupies only a fifth of chief. [vide Chief] The chief is formed of crooked the field, and is not confined to any particular part of the as well as straight lines, and is therefore distinguished field, except when there is only one bar, when it is put in

into the chief crenelle, chief dancette, &c. [vide Chief] the place of a fesse. Bars are mostly two in a field, somePale. The pale occupies the third middle part of the times three and more, as fig. 29, Plate No. I; “ Argent,

field perpendicularly, as fig. 25. The pale is charged two bars, gules, surmounted of as many serpents nowed, with things which are said to be on a pale ; and and affronté in pale azure." When the field is filled when things are borne perpendicularly one above with bars they are said to be barry, as “ Barry of four, another in the centre of the shield, they are said to be six pieces argent and azure, &c." When small figures are in pale, as in fig. 24, Plate No. II. (39). The pale has ranged horizontally above or below the middle of the two diminutives, namely, the pallet, which is the half of shield they are then said to be in bar, or barways; and the pale; and the endorse, which is the fourth of the when the bar does not touch the sides of the shield it is pallet ; and when the field is divided into four or more said to be couped. The diminutives of the bar are the even parts, by perpendicular lines of two different tinc closet, which is the half of the bar, and the barulet, tures interchangeably disposed, it is said to be paly of which is the half of the closet: when these diminutives so many pieces, as fig. 23, Plate No. II (39), “ Paly of are placed two and two in a shield they are called bars six argent and gules. The pale is also subject to the gemel. [vide Bur] The bar is sometimes subject to accidental forms of lines, namely, ingrailed, as in fig. 15,

the accidental forms of lines, as imbattled, ingrailed, &c. Plate No. II (39), “ Or, a pale ingrailed sable,” and in Chevron. The Chevron is an honourable ordinary, made vecked, fig. 16, “ Gules, a pale invecked argent," &c. of the bend dexter and sinister, issuing from the right [vide Pale]

and left base points of the escutcheon meeting and endBend. The bend is an ordinary drawn diagonally from ing pyramidically in the collar point, as fig. 30, “ Argent,

the dexter chief to the sinister base, in the form of a a chevron, gules.” It occupies, according to the French, belt, and occupies the third of the field, as fig. 26. A a third of the field; but according to the English, the bend is said to surmount when it lies over other ordina fifth. The chevron is subject to very many accidental ries or other figures, keeping its just length or breadth ; forms, for it is accompanied with, or charged with, other and things are said to be on a bend when the bend is figures, and is also imbattled, as in fig. 19, Plate No. II charged with them; in bend, and bendways, when they (39), “ Parted per chevron, embattled, vert and gules, are situated after the manner of a bend, as in fig. 26, three crows, argent ;" so, likewise, couped, abaissed, &c. Plate No. II (39), “ Gules, a two-handed sword, bend [vide Chevron When any figures are situated in a

VOL. II.

shield after the position of the chevron, they are said to argent and azure, between three lions' heads erased of be in chevron, or chevron-wise, as fig. 27, Plate No. II the second langued, gules.(39), “ Argent, two swords chevron-ways, piercing a Canton. The Canton is a square figure possessing a third heart, in chief, proper.” The diminutives of the chevron part of the chief, which is used as an additament of are the chevronel, which is the half, and the couple close, honour, and in particular as a Baronet's mark. The which is the fourth of its breadth. When the field is canton is frequently charged with other figures, as filled with pieces of equal number in the form of chev

fig. 37.

" Azure, three stars with a crescent in the rons, it is said to be chevronny of so many pieces, as centre; all within a double tressure flory and counterchevronny of six, argent and gules, &c.

flory, or; a canton of the second charged with a thistle, Cross. The Cross is composed of the pale and the fesse, ensigned with an imperial crown proper."

which meet in the centre, as in fig. 31, Argent, a cross, Quarter. The quarter is a square figure larger than the vert."

canton, as fig. 38. “ Gules, three cinquefoils, argent, After the introduction of the cross into the military a quarter, or, charged with a sword fessways, azure.'

ensigns of the crusaders, its use became very frequent, This is called by the French franc quartier. and its form was in consequence more varied than that Billets. Billets are oblong square figures which are supof any other ordinary. (vide Cross] A cross ragule is posed to represent billets, or letters missive. The proper represented in fig. 20, Plate No. II (39), as “ Argent, a position of the billets is erect, but when in fesse, or fessecross ragule, sable.

ways, they are said to be couché ; and, when diagonally Saltire, The Saltire, or Sautoir, is an honourable ordinary, placed, they are said to be bendways; and, when they

composed of the bend dexter and sinister, which is sup are placed after the manner of a crosspall, which is posed to represent the cross on which the apostle St. An called by the French pairle, they are then said to be en drew suffered, as fig. 32, Plate No. I. It is subject to the pairle, as fig. 1, Plate No. II (39). “ Gules, three accidental forms of the lines, as ingrailed, wavy, &c. When billets, or." When the field is charged with more than the saltire is between four figures it is said to be can ten billets irregularly, it is said to be billetty, or semé of toned, as fig. 29, Plate No. II (39), “ Argent, a saltire

billets. ingrailed, gules, cantoned with four roses of the last.” Gyron. An ordinary of two lines drawn from the side of When figures are borne on the saltire it is said to be the shield, meeting in the centre, or top; if these two charged, or they are said to be on a saltire, as fig. 30, lines are extended to the other side of the shield they Plate No. II (39), “ Argent, a saltire ingrailed, gules, form two girons, as fig. 2. Argent, two girons, gules, charged with another, or, and cantoned with four bugles, bendways. When the field is divided into six or more sable.Figures are also borne saltirewise, or in saltire. parts of different tinctures, all the points uniting in the [vide Saltire]

centre of the field, it is called gyronny. The Gyrons

are also subject to the accidental" forms of lines, as inSub-Ordinaries.

grailed, nebule, &c. [vide Gyron, &c.] The Sub-ordinaries are the Bordure, the Orle, the Tressure, Pile. The pile is an ordinary consisting of a twofold line

the Inescutcheon, the Canton, the Quarter, the Billet, formed after the manner of a wedge. It is subject to the Gyron, the Pile, the Flanche, the Lozenge, the the accidental forms of other ordinaries, as fig. 3. “ Or, Fusil, the Rustre, the Mascle, the Fret, the Roundle, a pile ingrailed, sable," so a pile waved, invecked, &c. and the Gutte.

[vide Pile] Bordure. A Bordure goes round the extremities of the Flanche. The Flanche is an ordinary made by an arch line

shield, and takes up mostly the fifth part of the field, that swells towards the centre, and is always borne in but sometimes more and sometimes less. The bordure couples, as fig. 4. “ Argent, two flanches, azure.". The is subject to all the different forms of lines belonging to flasque and the voider, two varieties of this ordinary, are the other ordinaries, as ingrailed, invecked, &c. and is said to be less in breadth. also charged with different figures, from which it derives Lozenge. The Lozenge is a rhomboidal figure that has the name of entoire, when charged with inanimate equal sides, and unequal angles, as fig. 5. “ Argent, a things ; verdoy, when charged with vegetables; enurey, chevron, sable, ensigned on the top with a cross patee, for a charge of beasts; and enaluron, for that of azure, between three lozenges of the second.” The birds. [vide Bordure, &c.) Bordures are also said to shield in which maids and widows bear their arms is of be componé, or gobonate, and checky. A bordure this form. When the field is filled with lozenges, it is componé is that which is filled with one rank of square said to be lozengy. (vide Lozenge] pieces, as fig. 33, Plate No. 1, “The arms of France Fusil. The Fusil is rhomboidal like the lozenge, but within a bordure componé, argent and gules;" when there longer than it is broad, as fig. 6. “ Or, a chevron beare two ranks of pieces it is called counter-componé; and tween three fusils, azure.' When the field is filled when three or more, checky. [vide Checky]

with fusils, it is called fusilly. Orle. The orle is an inner bordure which does not touch Rustre. The Rustre is a lozenge pierced round in the

the extremities of the shield, as fig. 34. “ Or, an orle, middle so that the field appears through, as fig. 7. azure.” The orle is properly a diminutive of the bordure. Argent, three rustres, azure.Tressure. The Tressure, or in French Treschur, is a di. Mascle. The Mascle is also a lozenge voided of the field,

minutive of the orle, and consists of a trace or tract but in a square form instead of a round one, as fig. 8. flowered, surrounding the inner part of the escutcheon Gules, nine mascles, three, three, and three, or." as an orle. When there are two of these tracts flowered Fret. The Fret is a figure which resembles two sticks and counterflowered, within and without, it is called a lying saltirewise, and interlaced, within a mascle, as double tressure, as fig. 35. “ Or, a lion rampant, gules, fig. 9. “ Sable, a fret, argent." It is sometimes called armed and langued, azure, within a double tressure fory the true lover's knot. Fretty, or fretted, is said of and counterflory."

any figures that are placed in the form of a fret, as Inescutcheon. The Inescutcheon represents the military

fig. 28.

Argent, three turbot fishes fretted proper, shield, and occupies the fifth middle of the escutcheon. one fesseways looking to the sinister, and two to the It is subject to the different accidental forms of other dexter chief and fesse points." ordinaries, as fig. 36. Sable, an escutcheon chequé, Roundle. The Roundle is an ordinary in the form of a

ball, which receives different names in English heraldry, as the ox, ram, &c. which are furnished with horns and according to the tincture, as follow :

hoofs different from their bodies, are said to be armed, If they be Or, they are called Bezants.

unguled, or hoofed, of such and such a tincture; but Argent, Plates.

deer are said to be attired on account of their antlers.
Gules,
Torteauxes.

Dogs, in respect to their kind, are blazoned beating,
Azure,
Hurts.

coursing, scenting, &c. The beaks and talons of birds of
Sable,
Pellets.

prey are termed their arms; whence they are said to be Vert, Poneys.

armed and membered ; and tame birds, on the contrary, Purpure, Golpes.

are said to be beaked and membered : but the cock is said Tenne, Oranges.

to be armed, crested, and jellopped, i.e. armed, for his beak Sanguine. Guzes.

and spurs; crested, on account of his comb; and jellopped,

on account of his wattles. The falcon is generally Bezants represent pieces of gold, or silver, in coat armour,

borne the same as the eagle, and blazoned in the same as fig. 10.

Gules, a fesse between three bezants, or." Torteaures are supposed to represent wastels, or cakes

terms, except when he has a hood, bells, virols, or rings,

and leishes, in which case he is said to be hooded, belled, of bread, as fig. 11. Argent, a chevron, sable, between

jessed, and leished; when in the act of striking his three torteauxes, gules."Rings and annulets were marks

prey, of nobility among the Romans, and became the prizes

he is said to be pouncing. When the heads of animals

are borne they are said to be couped, if cut evenly off, as of tournaments and jousts; whence they were naturally transferred to coat armour, as fig. 12. Or, three an

fig. Plate No. III (40); or couped close, if cut close;

caboshed, when the head is cut off close behind the ears, nulets, gules ;and, when these annulets, or great rings,

as fig. 4; and trunked, in particular, of bulls' heads; are borne one within another, they are termed, by the French, vires, as fig. 13. Gules, three vires, or an

era sed, if the head seem to be violently torn from the nulets within one another, argent.

body, as fig. 5. When the whole foreleg of a lion, or Guttees. Guttees are figures which represent drops; and,

other beast, is borne in arms, it is termed a jamb; and, like the roundles, they vary in their names according to

if couped, or erased, near the middle joint, it is a paw.

When the arm of a man is borne, it is either erect, when the tincture, as follow :

couped at the elbow; or embowed, when it forms an If they be Or, they are called Guttees d'or.

elbow'; dexter for the right arm, and sinister for the left.
Argent,
Guttees d'eau.

The temples of a man are said to be wreathed when de.
Gules,
Guttees de sang

corated with laurel, oak, ivy, &c. As to his whole dress,
Azure,
Guttees de larmes.

a man is said to be naked, or habited, rustre, in armour, Sable, Guttees de poir.

or in robes. Animals in general are said to be crined, Vert, Guttecs d'olive.

which have the hair of a different tincture ; sometimes An example of the guttees de sang is given in fig. 14; as they are said to be dismembered, when they are cut in

“Quarterly, first and fourth, sable, a St. Katharine's pieces, but not so as altogether to destroy the form ; wheel, argent ; second and third, argent, three guttees and debruised, when a bend, or any ordinary, is placed de sang, two and one."

over them. The wings of birds are said to be displayed, Charges.

when their wings are expanded, as fig. 6; close, when Charges are the figures of natural and artificial things, they sit close to the body; indorsed, when they sit back

which are called common charges, because they are com to back; crect, when the points of the wings are upmon to other sciences as well as heraldry. These wards; inverted, when the position is reversed, or the charges are blazoned variously, according to the points downwards. Fishes are said to be finned if the fins nature of the subjects. Animals are blazoned, in re are of a particular tincture. Of heavenly bodies, the sun spect to their posture and actions, as follow; rampant, as is said to be in his meridian, or his glory, or in an eclipse, a lion rampant, fig. 31, Plate No. II, when he is erect &c.; the moon, crescent, increscent, and decrescent ; standing on one of his hind legs; sejant, or sitting, a comet, streaming, &c. Of vegetables, the tree is as a lion sejant, fig. 32; couchant, i. e. lying at rest, said to be fructed, if bearing fruit; acorned, if bearing with the head erect,as fig. 33; passant, in a walking acorns; raguled and trunked, when its limbs are cut off, position, as fig. 34; gardant, looking full-faced, as in leaving only the stumps ; eradicated, when torn up by fig. 35, which is blazoned, “ A lion passant gardant;" the roots, blasted, withered, &c.; a branch is said to be rampant gardant, as fig. 35; saliant, in a leaping slipped, leaved, &c.; leaves and flowers are said to be posture, as fig. 36; tripping is said of the stag, as pendant, or erect, &c. The sheaves of corn are termed fig. 37 ; courant, of the stag, and other animals, running, garbs. If any thing seems to be proceeding from an. as fig. 38; at gaze, of the stag when he looks full-faced, other, it is termed issuant, as “ An arm imbowed as fig. 39; lodged, of the stag when at rest on the issuant ;" an arrow is said to be barbed and

feathered ; ground, as fig. 40; volant, of birds in general in a flying a castle is said to be towered ; a key, endorsed ; colours, posture, as 41; rising, of a bird that is preparing to fly, disvelopped ; a weapon, imbrued, that is bloody; a horse, as fig. 42; hauriant, of fishes when erect paleways, as furnished, when bridled, saddled, and completely capafig. 1, Plate No. III (40); naiant, swimming of fishes, risoned. When the field is divided into four quarters, as fig. 2. To these may be added other blazons of ani it is said to be quarterly when they have each their mals generally, as dormant, for a sleeping posture; charges; these are said to be on the first, i. e. on the addorsed, for two animals back to back; nowed, i. e. field of the first quarter; on the second, i. e. the field of knotted like a serpent; counter-passant, for two animals the second; and, when there are several metals, or tincwalking different ways ; so counter-saliant, counter-trip tures, of the first, is said to denote the first mentioned ; ping, &c. [vide Dormant, Addorsed, &c.] The teeth and of the last, to signify the last mentioned. and claws of lions, and other ravenous beasts, are called Distinctions of Houses. Distinctions of houses are certain their arms; and, when they are of a different tincture, differences which serve to inform us from what line the they are said to be armed; and, if their tongue be of a bearer of each is descended; which are otherwise called different tincture, they are said to be langued; as “A marks of cadency. The distinctions made use of for lion, argent, armed and langued, gules." Tame animals, differencing the several princes and princesses of the

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