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VI'BEX (Med.) a black and blue spot occasioned by a flux | VICIA (Bot.) a vinciendo, i. e. from binding; a plant so of blood.

called, according to Varro, because it bas tendrils like the VIBRATION (Mech.) another name for oscillation.

vine, by which it binds other plants. Varro de Ling. Lat. VI'BRIO (Ent.) a sort of worm that is invisible to the naked | Vicia, in the Linnean system, a genus of plants, Class 17

eye, classed under the Order Infusoria in the Linnean Diadelphia, Order 4 Decandria. system.

Generic Character. Cal. perianth one-leaved. - COR. VIBRI'SSÆ (Anat.) hairs growing in the nostrils.

papillionaceous.-STAM. filaments diadelphous; anthers VIBU'RNUM (Bot.) a plant mentioned by Virgil, which he erect, roundish. - Pist. germ linear ; style filiform;

calls lentum, i. e. flexible. It is derived from vincio, to bind, stigma obtuse.---Par. legume long; seeds several. because its branches were fit for binding.

Species. Plants of this genus are niostly annuals, as theVIBURNUM, in the Linnean system, a genus of plants, Class 5 Vicia saliva, Common Vetch or Tare.Vicia canescens, Pentandria, Order 3- Trigynia.

Hoary Vetch.-Vicia faba, the Bean; but the Vicia Generic Character. Cal. perianth five-parted.--COR. one pisiformis, seu Pisum sylvestre, Pale-flowered Vetch, is

petalled. — Stam. filaments five, awl-shaped ; anthers a perennial; and Vicia biennis is a biennial. roundish. — Pist. germ inferior; style none; stigmas Vicia is also the name of the Ervum tetraspermum, &c. three-Per. berry roundish; seeds bony.

VI'CIS et venalis, &c.(Law) an ancient writ against the mayor Species. The species are shrubs, as the Viburnum tinus, or bailiff of a town, &c. for not keeping the streets, &c.

Tinus, seu Laurus, Laurestinus, or Laurestine.- Vibur clean. num lantana, Viburnum, seu Lantana, the Wayfaring- VI'COUNT (Law) vide Viscount. Tree. — Viburnum opulus, Opulus, seu Sambucus, the VICTIMA'RII (Ant.) officers who attended the priests at Water Elder.- Viburnum lævigatum, seu Cassine, Cas the sacrifices for the purpose of slaying the victim, and sioberry-Bush.

performing all offices incident thereto. Val. Max, l. 1, VIBurnum

is also the name of the Hydrangea hortensis. c. 1; Liv. I. 40, c. 29; Suet. Calig. c. 32. VI'CAR (Law) vicarius, signifies properly one that acts in || VICTORIA (Ant.) victory was worshipped

another's stead, but it is commonly applied to the parson as a goddess among the ancients, and is of a parish where the tithes are impropriated.

commonly represented on medals with VI'CAR-GENERAL (Ecc.) a title given by King Hen. VIII. wings, as in the annexed figure.

to Thomas Cromwell, Earl of Essex, with full power to VICTORIA'LIS (Bot.) the Allium victorialis regulate all affairs of the church.—Grand Vicar, a cardinal of Linnæus. appointed by the pope to have jurisdiction over all secular VI'DAM (Law) the judge of a bishop's temporal jurisdicpriests, &c.

tion. VI'CARAGE (Law) the spiritual cure, or benefice of a vicar. I VODA'RA (Bot.) the Rhamnus napeca of Linnæus.

-Vicarage endowed, one which has a sufficient mainte- VIDUITATIS Professio (Archæol.) a solemn profession of nance for the vicar when the benefice is impropriated. living in a state of chaste widowhood, which was formerly Vicarage Teinds, small tithes in the Scotch Law of lambs, made with much ceremony in England. wool, eggs, &c.

VI ET ARMIS (Law) vide Vi. VICA'RIAL Tithes (Law) privy or small tithes.

VIEW (Law) a claim made by the tenant for the jury to VICA'RIO deliberando, &c. (Law) a writ that lies for a see the land, or thing claimed, and in controversy. Britt.

spiritual person imprisoned upon forfeiture of a recogni c. 45; F. N. B. 178.- View of Frank-pledge, the office zance, &c. Reg. Orig. 147.

of the sheriff, who has to look io the King's peace, and to VICE (Mech.) from vis, force, an instrument used by smiths see that every man be in some pledge.

and other artificers to secure a piece of iron, or any thing | View (Sport.) The print of the feet of a fallow deer on the else, while they are working upon it.

ground. Vice, among glaziers, is an instrument with two wheels, View of a place (Mil.) is said to be taken when the general, made use of in drawing lead from place to place.

accompanied by an engineer, reconnoitres the place that Vice (Polit.) from the Latin vice, in place of; is applied to is to be besieged, by riding round, and observing its situa

various officers, to denote that they act under and in the tion, and the nature of the adjacent country, as to hills, place of others who are their superiors, as Vice-Admiral, vallies, &c. Vice-Chamberlain, &c.

VIEWERS (Law) those who are sent by a court to view VICE-A'DMIRAL (Mar.) one of the three principal officers any place or person in question ; as to the situation of a

in the Royal Navy, who commands the second squadron. place where a fact was committed; of a person in case of [vide Admiral]

sickness, &c. VICE-CHAMBERLAIN (Polit.) a great officer at court || VIGI'LIA (Ecc.) from vigilo, to watch; the vigil or eve

next to the Lord Chamberlain, who, in his absence, has immediately preceding a Holy Day, so called because the control and command of all officers belonging to that Christians used to fast, watch, and pray. part of the King's household called the chamber.

VIGI'LIÆ (Ant.) the nightly watch which the Roman VICE-CHANCELLOR (Law) an officer lately appointed soldiers were obliged to perform when upon duty. The

to assist the Lord Chancellor in his judicial capacity. proper vigiles were four in every manipulus, who kept guard VICE-CHANCELLOR (Cus.) the head, or superior officer in for three hours, and were then relieved by others. Polyb.

the two universities of Oxford and Cambridge, who per 1.6, c. 33; Veget. 1. 3, c. 8. forms the active duties of government in the place of the VIGI'LIÆ Plantarum (Bot.) the state of plants when their Chancellor.

flowers open as they commonly do at certain hours in the VICE-CONSTABLE OF ENGLAND (Pulit.) an office day. mentioned in Pat. Edw. 4.

VIGNETTE (Print.) a frontispiece to a book, VICE-DOMINUS (Law) a viscount or sheriff.–Vice-Do- || VIGO'NE (Com.) a sort of Spanish wool.

minus Episcopi, the official commissary, or vicar general of VIGOROʻSO (Mus.) Italian for bold as applied to the pera bishop.

formance. VICEGERENT (Law) a deputy or lieutenant. Stat.31 Hen.8. VI LAICA, &c. (Law) a writ against a parson who, with the VICEROY (Polit.) the Lord Lieutenant of a kingdom, as assistance of the Jaity, holds another out of a church, the Viceroy of Ireland.

vi et armis. F. N. B. 54;. New. Nat. Brev. 121.

C. 6.

VILL (Law) a term sometimes taken for a manor, and some Aristoph. in Equit. times for a parish, or part of it. Flet. I. 6, c. 51; Fortes.

'Εν ταΐσι ιοσέφανους οικεί, της αρχαια ίσων Αθήνας. de St. Aug. c. 24. Villa regia, a title given to those villages where the Kings of England had their royal The violet was next in estimation to the rose among the seat.

ancients, who mention the black and the white sorts. VI'LLAIN (Law) or villein, villanus, men of base and ser. Theophrast

. 1. 6, c. 6; Dioscor. l. 4, c. 122 ; Plin. l. 21, vile condition, of which there were two sorts; namely, a villein in gross, who was bound immediately to his lord ; Viola, in the Linnean system, a genus of plants, Class 5 and villein regardant to a manor, who was bound to his Pentandria, Order) Monogynia. lord as a member belonging to a manor whereof the lord Generic Character. CAL. perianth five-leaved.-Cor. fivewas owner. Bract. I. 1, c. 6; Old. Nat. Brev. 8.

petalled.--STAM. filaments five.--Pist. germ superior; VILLA'NIS regis (Law) a writ that lay for bringing back style filiform; stigma oblique.—Per. capsule ovate ; seeds

the King's bondmen that had been carried away out of the many. manor whereto they belonged. Reg. Orig. 87.

Species. Plants of this genus, well known in English by VILLA'RIA (Bot.) a genus of plants, Class 22 Dioecia, the name of the Violet, are perennials, as- Viola odoOrder 5 Pentandria.

rata, the Sweet Violet.- Viola palustris, the Marsh VI'LLENAGE (Law) the basest sort of tenurc by which Violet.- Viola montana, the Mountain Violet. — Viola

lands or tenements were formerly held; it was abolished, tricolor, the Pansy Violet, or Heart's Ease. with the other parts of the feudal system, by stat. 12 Car. 2, Viola is also the name of some species, as of the Cheiranc. 24.

thus, the Campanula, and the Hotlonia. VILLO'SUS (Bot.) pubescent, or covered with soft hairs; VIOLENT signs (Astrol.) such in which the ill-boding

an epithet for the stem, as in Tomex and Rhus; for the planets, as Saturn and Mars, have any notable dignities. leaf,' as Ulex europeus, or Furze; and also for the stigma, VIOLET (Bot.) the Viola of Linnæus.-Calathian Violet, &c.

a species of the Gentiana.--Corn Violet, the Campanula VI'LLUS (Bot.) a term applied by Linnæus to the soft close hybrida.--Damask Violet, the Hesperis tristis.--Dog-tooth

hairs on different parts of plants, which form a fine nap or Violet, the Erythronium. -Water Violet, the Hottonia. pile like velvet.

VIOLONCE'LLO (Mus.) or violincello, a bass violin conVI'MEN (Bot.) a wythe, or flexible twig.

taining four strings, the lowest of which is tuned to double VINA'GIÙM (Law) the payment of a certain quantity of C. The strings are tuned in fifths, consequently the pitch wine to the lord in lieu of rent.

of that next the gravest is G gamut; that of the next D VINA’LIA (Ant.) a festival observed by the Romans on the on the third line of the bass; and that of the upper string

nineteenth of August in honour of Jupiter and Venus. It A on the fifth line. was so called a vino, i. e. from wine, because a libation VIOLO'NO (Mus.) the name formerly given by the Italians was offered in a particular manner to Jupiter. Varro de and French to the violoncello, but was afterwards transLing. Lat. I. 5, c. 3; Plin. l. 18, c. 29.

ferred to the double bass; a large deep-toned instrument, VI’NCA (Bot.) a genus of plants, Class 5 Pentandria, Order 1 extending in general to double C downwards, and reaching Monogynia.

in ascent to the treble cliff note, or even higher. Generic Character. Cal. perianth five-parted.-Cor. one- VIO'RNA (Bot.) the Clematis viorna of Linnæus.

petalled.-Stam. filaments five; anthers membranaceous. VI'PER (Zool.) an animal of the serpent tribe, the Coluber -Pist. germs two; style one, common to both ; stigma of Linnæus; the bite of which is more or less venomous capillate. - Per. follicles two, round; seeds numerous, every where, but in hot countries is almost instantly fatal. oblong

This animal was formerly much esteemed for its medicinal Species. Plants of this genus are creeping perennials, as virtues.

the-Vinca minor, Pervinca, seu Clematis, Small Peri- | VIPERARIA (Bot.) or viperina, the Aristolochia serpentina winkle. - Vinca major, Great Periwinkle, &c. Dod. of Linnæus. Pempt.; Clus. Hist.; Bauh. Hist.; Bauh. Pin.; Ger. | VI'PER'S-GRASS (Bot.) the Scorzonera of Linnæus. Herb.; Park. Theat. Bot.; Raii Hist.

VI'REA (Bot.) the Apargia hispida of Linnæus. VINCETO'XICUM (Ent.) the Asclepias rincetoxicum of VIRECTA (Bot.) a genus of plants, Class 5 Pentandria, Linnæus.

Order 1 Monogynia. VI'NCULUM (Algeb.) a mark or character in the form of || VI'RGA (Archeol.) the rod or staff which sheriffs, bailiffs

, a line drawn over a quantity, which consists of several

&c. carry as a badge of their office.- Virga ulnaria, a yard terms; thus, a + bxc denotes the product of c, and of measure according to the legal ell, or true standard.— Virga

the sum a + b considered as one quantity. [vide Algebra] ferrea, the standard measure kept in the Exchequer, which VINDIMIA’TRIX (Astron.) a star of the third magnitude was formerly made of iron, but now of brass. in the constellation virgo.

Virga aurea (Bot.) the Cacalia saracenica of Linnæus. VINDICTA (Ant.) the Prætor's rod among the Romans, | VIRGA pastoris (Bot.) the Dipsacus pilosus of Linnæus.

which he laid on the head of slaves in the act of manumis- || VIRGA sanguina (Bot.) the same as the Cormus. sion. Liv. I. 2, c. 5; Priscian, de Art. Grammat.

VIRGATĂ sutura (Anat.) the sagittal suture. VINE (Bot.) the l'ilis of Linnæus.

VI'RGINAL (Mus.) a stringed and keyed instrument reVI'NEA (Ant.) wicker hurdles laid on props to serve as a sembling the spinnet; it was formerly much in esteem, but shelter for the Roman soldiers at a siege while carrying on now entirely out of use. their works. Heron. de Mach. ; Veget. 1. 4, c. 15.

VIRGINIAŃ acacia (Bot.) the Pscudacacia, a shrub.–VirgiVI'SUM medicatum (Med.) medicated wine, in which herbs nian Cowslip, the Dolecatheon medium.-Virginian Creeper, have been infused for medicinal purposes.

the Clematis virginiana, a shrub.–Virginian Golden Rose, VI'NEGAR (Chem.) vide Acetum.

the Spiræa apulifolia.-Virginian Poke, the Phytolacca de VIOL (Mus.) in the Italian viola ; a name formerly given to candra.--- Virginian Silk, the Periploca græca, a shrub. the instrument now called the violin.

VIRGIN'S BOWER (Bot.) the "Clematis of Linnæus, & VIOLA (Bot.) probably from the Greek is, which was a shrub.

coronary plant; whence Venus was styled josiputor, and VIRGIN'S MI'LK (Chem.) a solution of Gum Benzoin. Aristophanes gives the same title to the Athenians. VI'RGO (Astron.) rugbóres, the sixth sign of the zodiac, which

næus.

the sun enters about the 21st or 22d of August. Ptolemy dignity in the Ottoman Empire. As there is more than Teckons in this constellation 32 stars; Kepler 39; Bayer one vizier, the highest is styled the Grand Vizier, by way 42; Hevelius 50; and the Britannic Catalogue 110; of

of distinction. which one, called Vindimialriz, is of the third magnitude. VISION (Opt.) the sensation produced on the brain by the The fables of the Greeks are very various respecting this action of the rays of light on the optic nerves. Vision is sign; yet little doubt can be entertained that the female distinguished into clear, confused, direct, reflected, refracted, with ears of corn was intended to denote the period of &c. according to the nature of the rays. [vide Optics, harvest. Eratosth. Characteris.; Hygin. Poel. Astron.; Plol. Rays, &c.] Almag. I. 7, c. 5; Ricciol. Almag. nov. 1. 6.

VISITATION (Ecc.) the office and act performed by the Virgo (Astrol.) is reputed to be the house and exaltation of bishop once in three years, or by the archdeacon once a Mercury, of an earthy, cold, and dry quality.

year, in each diocese, to inspect affairs relating to ecclesiVI'RGULA divinitoria (Min.) the divining rod; a rod in the astical discipline, &c.— The feast of the visitation of our

shape of the letter Y, by the help of which it was formerly lady, a festival observed in the Church of Rome in comsupposed that men could magically discover mines.

memoration of the visit made to Elizabeth by the Virgin VIRIDA'RIO eligendo (Law) a writ for choosing a verderer Mary. of a forest.

VISITOR (Law) an inspector into the government of a corVIRO'LA (Bot.) the Myristica sebifera of Linnæus.

poration.- Visitor of manners, a name formerly given to the VIROLLE (Her.) a term for a hunting horn when set round regarder of a forest. Manw. For. Laws, part I. with a metal or colour different from the horn.

VI'SMEA (Bot.) a shrub growing in the Canary Islands, Class VI'RTUAL focus (Opt.) a point in the axis of a glass where 11 Dodecandria, Order 3 Trigynia, in the Linpean system. the continuation of a refracted ray meets it.

VI'SNAGA (Bot.) the Daucus visnaga of Linnæus. VIRTUOSO (Phil.) one who is curious in his researches into VI'SNE (Law) the vicinage or neighbourhood. the properties of natural objects.

VISO'RIUM (Print.) an instrument to which a leaf of copy VIRTU'TE officii (Law) i.e. by virtue of one's office, which, is fixed for the convenience of the compositor in reading it.

in a legal sense, makes an act good, and justifiable. VISTAME'NTE (Mus.) Italian for very quick, as applied VI'RUS (Surg.) a watery fetid matter issuing from wounds, to the performance.

which is endued with corrosive and malignant qualities. VISTNU-CLAUDI (Bot.) the Evolvulus alsinoides of LinVIS (Law) violence, or any kind of force. Vis (Phy.) a term which is employed by writers on physic to VISTU (Hort.) or visto, Italian for a straight walk cut denote

any natural force or power, which has been distin through the trees in a wood. guished into vis absoluta, acceleratrix, centripeta, centri- VISU Franci Plegii (Law)

VISU_Franci Plegii (Law) a writ to exempt one from view fuga, inertiæ, motrit, &c. [vide Absoluta, Acceleralrir, of Frank-Pledge, not being resident in the hundred. &c.)

VISUAL (Opt.) an epithet for what relates to vision, as a Vis mortua (Mech.) and vis vivi, terms used by Leibnitz for visual angle, that angle under which an object is seen.

two sorts of force; the first of which implied any kind of Visual Line. (vide Line]-Visual Rays, lines of light conpressure, or endeavour to move, not sufficient to produce ceived to come from the object to the eye. motion; and the second the power of moving, which re VISUAL Point (Perspect.) a point in the horizontal line sides in a body in a state of motion.

wherein all the ocular rays unite. Vis mortua (Anat.) that property by which a muscle contracts VI'SUS (Anat.) the sense of seeing. after ihe death of an animal.

VI'TÆ Arbor (Bot.) vide Arbor. VISC A'GO (Bot.) the Cucubalus bacciferus of Linnæus. VI'TAL Air (Chem.) or oxygen, so called because it is that VISCA'RIA (Bot.) the Lychnis viscaria of Linnæus.

portion of the air which is essential for the preservation of VI'SCERA (Anat.) the different organs or parts of the human life.

body which have an appropriate use, as the intestines, Vital Functions (Anat.) those functions or faculties of the liver, gall-bladder, &c. : the term is particularly applied to body on which life immediately depends ; as the circulathe intestines.

tion of the blood, respiration, the heat of the body, &c. VISCERATIO (Ant.) a feast among the Romans, which was vi'TEX (Bot.) a genus of plants, Class 14 Didynamia,

made upon the entrails of the victims. Liv. 1. 8, c. 22; Senec. Order 2 Angiospermia. Epist. 19; Suet. Jul. c. 38; Aler. Gen. Dier. I. 5, c. 7, &c. Generic Character. Cal. perianth one-leaved.-Cor. oneVI'SCOUNT'S Coronet (Her.) has neither

petalled.-Stam. filaments four; anthers versatile.-flowers nor points raised above the circle,

Pist. germ roundish ; style filiform; stigmas two, awl. like those of the superior degrees, but only

shaped.-Per. berry or drupe globular; seeds solitary. pearls placed on the circle itself, as in the

Species. Plants of this genus are trees, as the— Vitez annexed figure. The number of the pearls

agnus castus, seu Eleagnum, the Officinal Chaste-Tree. is however not limited to six, like that of the baron's co - Viler trifolia, Lagondium, seu Caranosi, Threeronet.

leaved Chaste-Tree. — Vitex negundo, Negundo, seu VISCOIDES (Bot.) the Psychotrea parasitica of Linnæus. Bemnosi, Five-leaved Chaste-Tree, &c. Dod. Pempt. ; VI'SCUM (Bot.) izíc, or izos, a plant of the oak kind men Clus. Hist.; Bauh. Hist.; Bauh. Pin.; Ger. Herb.;

tioned by Theophrastus and Dioscorides. Theophrast. Park. Theat. Botan.; Raii Hist. ; Tourn. Inst. &c. Hist. Plant.; Dioscor. I. 3, c. 103.

Vitex is also the name of the Rhus tomentosum et lucidum. Viscum, in the Linnean system, a genus of plants, Class 22 VITICEʻLLA (Bot.) the Clematis viticella of Linnæus. Dioecia, Order 4 Tetrandria.

VITILIGO (Med.) vide Alphus. Generic Character. CAL. perianth four-parted. - Cor. VI'TIS (Ant.) the badge of the Centurion's office in the

none.—Stam. in the males, four; filaments done; an. Roman army, whence it became the name of the office thers oblong.–Pist, in the females; germ oblong; style itself. none; stigma obtuse.

Lucan. I. 6, v. 145. Species. Plants of this kind, well known in English by the

ibi sanguine multo, name of Misseltoe, grow on other trees.

Promotus Latiam longo gerit ordine vitem. VI'SCUS (Anat.) vide Viscera.

It was also employed as an instrument of corporal punishVI'SIER (Polit.) vizier, or vizir, an officer of the highest ment.

as

VILL (Law) a term sometimes taken for a manor, and some Aristoph. in Equit. times for a parish, or part of it. Flet. I. 6, c. 51; Fortes.

'Εν ταΐσι ιοςέφανους οικεί, της αρχαια ίσων Αθήνας. de St. Aug. c. 24. – Villa regia, a title given to those villages where the Kings of England had their royal The violet was next in estimation to the rose among the seat.

ancients, who mention the black and the white sorts. VI'LLAIN (Law) or villein, villanus, men of base and ser. Theophrast. 1. 6, c. 6; Dioscor. l. 4, c. 122; Plin. I. 21, vile condition, of which there were two sorts; namely, a

c. 6. villein in gross, who was bound immediately to his lord ; | Viola, in the Linnean system, a genus of plants, Class 5 and villein regardant to a manor, who was bound to his Pentandria, Order) Monogynia. lord as a member belonging to a manor whereof the lord Generic Character. Cal. perianth five-leaved.—Cor. fivewas owner. Bract. I. 1, c. 6; Old. Nat. Brev. 8.

petalled.-Stam. filaments five.-Pist. germ superior; VILLA'NIS regis (Law) a writ that lay for bringing back style filiform; stigma oblique.-Per. capsule ovate; seeds

the King's bondmen that had been carried away out of the many. manor whereto they belonged. Reg. Orig. 87.

Species. Plants of this genus, well known in English by VILLA'RIA (Bot.) a genus of plants, Class 22 Dioecia, the name of the Violet, are perennials, - Viola odoOrder 5 Pentandria.

rata, the Sweet Violet.-Viola palustris, the Marsh VI'LLENAGE (Law) the basest sort of tenure by which Violet.- Viola montana, the Mountain Violet. — Viola

lands or tenements were formerly held; it was abolished, tricolor, the Pansy Violet, or Heart's Ease. with the other parts of the feudal system, by stat. 12 Car. 2, Viola is also the name of some species, as of the Cheiranc. 24.

thus, the Campanula, and the Hollonia. VILLO'SUS (Bot.) pubescent, or covered with soft hairs; VIOLENT signs (Astrol.) such in which the ill-boding an epithet for the stem, as in Tomex and Rhus; for the

planets, as Saturn and Mars, have any notable dignities. leaf, as Ulex europæus, or Furze; and also for the stigma, VIOLET (Bot.) the Viola of Linnæus.-Calathian Violet

, &c.

a species of the Gentiana.-Coru Violet, the Campanula VI'LLUS (Bnt.) a term applied by Linnæus to the soft close hybrida.--Damask Violet, the Hesperis tristis.-- Dog.tooth

hairs on different parts of plants, which form a fine nap or Violet, the Erythronium.-Water Violet, the Hottonia. pile like velvet.

VIOLONCE'LLO (Mus.) or violincello, a bass violin conVIMEN (Bot.) a wythe, or flexible twig.

taining four strings, the lowest of which is tuned to double VINA'GIÙM (Law) the payment of a certain quantity of C. The strings are tuned in fifths, consequently the pitch wine to the lord in lieu of rent.

of that next the gravest is G gamut; that of the next D VINA’LIA (Ant.) a festival observed by the Romans on the on the third line of the bass; and that of the upper string

nineteenth of August in honour of Jupiter and Venus. It A on the fifth line. was so called a vino, i. e. from wine, because a libation VIOLO'NO (Mus.) the name formerly given by the Italians was offered in a particular manner to Jupiter. Varro de and French to the violoncello, but was afterwards transLing. Lat. I. 5, c. 3; Plin. l. 18, c. 29.

ferred to the double bass; a large deep-toned instrument, VI'NCA (Bot.) a genus of plants, Class 5 Pentandria, Order 1 extending in general to double C downwards, and reaching Monogynia.

in ascent to the treble cliff note, or even higher. Generic Character. Cal. perianth five-parted.-Cor. one VIO'RNA (Bot.) the Clematis viorna of Linnæus.

petalled.-Stam. filaments five; anthers membranaceous. VI'PER (Zool.) an animal of the serpent tribe, the Coluber -Pist. germs two; style one, common to both ; stigma of Linnæus; the bite of which is more or less venomous capillate.

— Per. follicles two, round ; seeds numerous, every where, but in hot countries is almost instantly fatal. oblong.

This animal was formerly niuch esteemed for its medicinal Species. Plants of this genus are creeping peren:ials, as virtues.

the-Vinca minor, Pervinca, seu Clematis, Small Peri- VIPERARIA (Bot.) or viperina, the Aristolochia serpentina winkle.- Vinca major, Great Periwinkle, &c. Dod. of Linnæus. Pempt. ; Clus. Hist.; Bauh. Hist.; Bauh. Pin.; Ger. || VI'PER'S-GRASS (Bot.) the Scorzonera of Linnæus. Herb.; Park. Theat. Bot.; Raii Hist.

VI'REA (Bot.) the Apargia hispida of Linnæus. VINCETO'XICUM (Ent.) the Asclepias vincetoxicum of | VIRE'CTA (Bot.) a genus of plants, Class 5 Pentandria, Linnæus.

Order 1 Monogynia. VINCULUM (Algeb.) a mark or character in the form of VI'RGA (Archæol.) the rod or staff which sheriffs, bailiffs, a line drawn over a quantity, which consists of several

&c. carry as a badge of their office. Virga ulnaria, a yard terms; thus, a +bxc denotes the product of c, and of measure according to the legal ell, or true standard.

Virga the sum a + b considered as one quantity. [vide Algebra)

ferrea, the standard measure kept in the Exchequer, which VINDIMIA'TRIX (Astron.) a star of the third magnitude was formerly made of iron, but now of brass. in the constellation virgo.

Virga aurea (Bot.) the Cacalia saracenica of Linnæus. VINDICTA (Ant.) the Prætor's rod among the Romans, VIRGA pastoris (Bot.) the Dipsacus pilosus of Linnæus.

which he laid on the head of slaves in the act of manumis- || Virga sanguina (Bot.) the same as the Cormus. sion. Liv. 1. 2, c. 5; Priscian, de Art. Grammat.

VIRGATA sutura (Anat.) the sagittal suture. VINE (Bot.) the l'ilis of Linnæus.

VI'RGINAL (Mus.) a stringed and keyed instrument reVI'NEA (Ant.) wicker hurdles laid on props to serve as a sembling the spinnet; it was fornierly much in esteem, but

shelter for the Roman soldiers at a siege while carrying on now entirely out of use. their works. Heron. de Mach.; Veget. I. 4, c. 15.

VIRGI'NIAŃ acacia (Bot.) the Pseudacacia, a shrub.–VirgiVIINUM medicatum (Med.) medicated wine, in which herbs nian Cowslip, the Dodecatheon medium.- Virginian Creeper, have been infused for medicinal purposes.

the Clematis virginiana, a shrub.–Virginian Golden Rose, VINEGAR (Chem.) vide Acetum.

the Spiræa apulifolia.-Virginian Poke, the Phytolacca de VIOL (Mus.) in the Italian viola ; a name formerly given to candra.Virginian Silk, the Periploca græca, a shrub. the instrument now called the violin.

VIRGIN'S BOʻWER (Bot.) the "Clematis of Linnæus, & VI'OLA (Bot.) probably from the Greek for, which was a shrub.

coronary plant; whence Venus was styled losip uver, and VIRGIN'S MI'LK (Chem.) a solution of Gum Benzoin. Aristophanes gives the same title to the Athenians. VI'RGO (Astron.) zapbóvos, the sixth sign of the zodiac, which

næus.

the sun enters about the 21st or 22d of August. Ptolemy dignity in the Ottoman Empire. As there is more than Teckons in this constellation 32 stars; Kepler 39 ; Bayer one vizier, the highest is styled the Grand Vizier, by way 42; Hevelius. 50; and the Britannic Catalogue 110; of

of distinction. which one, called Vindimiatris, is of the third magnitude. VI'SION (Opt.) the sensation produced on the brain by the The fables of the Greeks are very various respecting this action of the rays of light on the optic nerves. Vision is sign; yet little doubt can be entertained that the female distinguished into clear, confused, direct, reflected, refracted, with ears

corn was intended to denote the period of &c. according to the nature of the rays. [vide Optics, harvest. Eratosth. Characteris.; Hygin. Poel. Astron. ; Ptol. Rays, &c.] Almag. 1. 7, c. 5; Ricciol. Almag. nov. 1. 6.

VISITATION (Ecc.) the office and act performed by the Virgo (Astrol.) is reputed to be the house and exaltation of bishop once in three years, or by the archdeacon once a Mercury, of an earthy, cold, and dry quality.

year, in each diocese, to inspect affairs relating to ecclesiVIRGULA divinitoria (Min.) the divining rod; a rod in the astical discipline, &c.— The feast of the visitation of our

shape of the letter Y, by the help of which it was formerly lady, a festival observed in the Church of Rome in comsupposed that men could magically discover mines.

memoration of the visit made to Elizabeth by the Virgin VIRIDA'RIO eligendo (Law) a writ for choosing a verderer

Mary. of a forest.

VISITOR (Law) an inspector into the government of a corVIRO'LA (Bot.) the Myristica sebifera of Linnæus.

poration.- Visitor of manners, a name formerly given to the VIROLLE' (Her.) a term for a hunting horn when set round regarder of a forest. Manw. For. Laws, part I. with a metal or colour different from the horn.

VI'SMEA (Bot.) a shrub growing in the Canary Islands, Class VI'RTUAL focus (Opt.) a point in the axis of a glass where 11 Dodecandria, Order 3 Trigynia, in the Linnean system, the continuation of a refracted ray meets it.

VI'SNAGA (Bot.) the Daucus visnaga of Linnæus. VIRTUO'SO (Phil.) one who is curious in his researches into VI'SNE (Law) the vicinage or neighbourhood. the properties of natural objects.

VISO'RIUM (Print.) an instrument to which a leaf of

copy VIRTUTE officii (Law) i.e. by virtue of one's office, which, is fixed for the convenience of the compositor in reading it. in a legal sense, makes an act good, and justifiable.

VISTAME'NTE (Mus.) Italian for very quick, as applied VI'RUS (Surg.) a watery fetid matter issuing from wounds, to the performance.

which is endúed with corrosive and malignant qualities. VISTNU-CLAUDI (Bot.) the Evolvulus alsinoides of LinVIS (Law) violence, or any kind of force. Vis (Phy.) a term which is employed by writers on physic to VISTU (Hort.) or visto, Italian for a straight walk cut

denote any natural force or power, which has been distin through the trees in a wood. guished into vis absoluta, acceleratrix, centripeta, centri-VISU Franci Plegii (Law) a writ to exempt one from view fuga, inertia, motrit, &c. [vide Absoluta, Acceleralrix, of Frank-Pledge, not being resident in the hundred. &c.)

VISUAL (Opt.) an epithet for what relates to vision, as a Vis mortua (Mech.) and vis viva, terms used by Leibnitz for visual angle, that angle under which an object is seen.

two sorts of force; the first of which implied any kind of Visual Line. (vide Line]Visual Rays, lines of light conpressure, or endeavour to move, not sufficient to produce ceived to come from the object to the eye. motion; and the second the power of moving, which re- Visual Point (Perspect.) a point in the horizontal line sides in a body in a state of motion.

wherein all the ocular rays unite. Vis mortua (Anat.) that property by which a muscle contracts VISUS (Anat.) the sense of seeing. after ihe death of an animal.

VI'TÆ Arbor (Bot.) vide Arbor. VISCA'GO (Bot.) the Cucubalus bacciferus of Linnæus. VI'TAL Air (Chem.) or oxygen, so called because it is that VISCARIA (Bot.) the Lychnis viscaria of Linnæus.

portion of the air which is essential for the preservation of VI'SCERA (Ànat.) the different organs or parts of the human life.

body which have an appropriate use, as the intestines, Vital Functions (Anat.) those functions or faculties of the liver, gall-bladder, &c. : the term is particularly applied to body on which life immediately depends ; as the circulathe intestines.

tion of the blood, respiration, the heat of the body, &c. VISCERA’TIO (Ant.) a feast among the Romans, which was VI'TEX (Bot.) a genus of plants, Class 14 Didynamia,

made upon the entrails of the victims. Liv. I. 8, c. 22; Senec. Order 2 Angiospermia. Epist. 19; Suet. Jul. c. 38; Alex. Gen. Dier. 1. 5, c. 7, &c. Generic Character. Cal. perianth one-leaved.-Cor. one. VI'SCOUNT’S Coronet (Her.) has neither

petalled.—Stam. filaments four; anthers versatile.flowers nor points raised above the circle,

Pist. germ roundish; style filiform; stigmas two, awl. like those of the superior degrees, but only

shaped.-Per. berry or drupe globular; seeds solitary. pearls placed on the circle itself, as in the

Species. Plants of this genus are trees, as the-Vitex annexed figure. The number of the pearls

agnus castus, seu Elæagnum, the Officinal Chaste-Tree. is however not limited to six, like that of the baron's co

Viler trifolia, Lagondium, seu Caranosi, Threeronet.

leaved Chaste-Tree. – Vilex_negundo, Negundo, seu VISCOIDES (Bot.) the Psychot rea parasitica of Linnæus. Bemnosi, Five-leaved Chaste-Tree, &c. Dod. Pempt.; VI'SCUM (Bot.) izíc, or izos, a plant of the oak kind men Clus. Hist.; Bauh. Hist.; Bauh. Pin.; Ger. Herb.;

tioned by Theophrastus and 'Dioscorides. Theophrast. Park. Theat. Botan.; Raii Hist.; Tourn. Inst. &c. Hist. Plant.; Dioscor. I. 3, c. 103.

Vitex is also the name of the Rhus tomentosum et lucidum. Viscum, in the Linnean system, a genus of plants, Class 22 VITICE'LLA (Bot.) the Clematis viticella of Linnæus. Dioecia, Order 4 Tetrandria.

VITILIGO (Med.) vide Alphus. Generic Character. Cal. perianth four-parted. CoR. VI'TIS (Ant.) the badge of the Centurion's office in the

none.-Stam. in the males, four; filaments none; an. Roman army, whence it became the name of the office thers oblong.–Pist, in the females; germ oblong; style

itself. none; stigma obtuse.

Lucan. I. 6, v. 145. Species. Plants of this kind, well known in English by the

ibi sanguine multo, name of Misseltoe, grow on other trees.

Promotus Latiam longo gerit ordine vitem. VI'SCUS (Anat.) vide Viscera.

It was also employed as an instrument of corporal punishVI'SIER (Polit.) vizier, or vizir, an officer of the highest ment.

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