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III.

Society, friendship, and love,

Divinely bestow'd upon man, O, had I the wings of a dove,

How soon would I taste you again! My sorrows I then might assuage

In the ways of religion and truth, Might learn from the wisdom of age,

And be cheer'd by the sallies of youth.

IV.

Religion! what treasure untold

Resides in that heavenly word! More precious than silver and gold,

Or all that this Earth can afford. But the sound of the church-going bell

These vallies and rocks never heard, Never sigh'd at the sound of a knell,

Or smil'd when a sabbath appear'd.

V,

Ye winds, that have made me your sport,

Convey to this desolate shore Some cordial endearing report

Of a land, I shall visit no more.

My friends, do they now and then send
A wish or a thought after me 1

O tell me I yet have a friend,
Though a friend I am never to see.

VI.

How fleet is a glance of the mind!

ComparM with the speed of ifs flight, The tempest itself lags behind,

And the swift-winged arrows of light. When I think of my own native land,

In a moment I seem to be there; But alas! recollection at hand

Soon hurries me back to despair.

VII.

But the seafowl is gone to her nest,

The beast is laid down in his lair; Even here is a season of rest,

And I to my cabin repair. There's mercy in every place,

And mercy, encouraging thought! Gives even affliction a grace,

And reconciles man to his lot.

ON THE PROMOTION OF

EDWARD THURLOW, Esq.,

TO THE LORD HIGH CHANCELLORSHIP OF ENGLAND.

I.

Round ThurloVs head in early youth,

And in his sportive days,
Fair Science pour'd the light of truth,

And Genius shed his rays.

II.

See! with united wonder cried
Th' experienc'd and the sage,

Ambition in a boy supplied
With all the skill of age?

III.

Discernment, eloquence, and grace

Proclaim him born to sway
The balance in the highest place,

And bear the palm away.

IV.

The praise bestow'd was just and wise;

He sprang impetuous forth Secure of conquest, where the prize

Attends superior worth.

V.

So the best courser on the plain
Ere yet he starts is known,

And does but at the goal obtain
What all had deem'd his own.

ODE TO PEACE.
I.

Come, peace of mind, delightful guest
Return and make thy downy nest

Once more in this sad heart: Nor riches I nor pow'r pursue, Nor hold fobidden joys in view;

We therefore need not part.

II.

Where wilt thou dwell, if not with me,

From av'rice and ambition free,

*

And pleasure's fatal wiles?
For whom, alas! dost thou prepare
The sweets that I was wont to share,

The banquet of thy smiles?

III.

The great, the gay, shall they partake The Heav'n that thou alone canst make?

And wilt thou quit the stream, That murmurs through the dewy mead, The grove and the sequester'd shed,

To be a guest with them]

IV.

For thee I panted, thee I priz'd.

For thee I gladly sacrific'd
Whate'er I loVd before;

And shall I see thee start away,

And helpless, hopeless, hear thee sayFarewell! we meet no more?

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