The Private Tutor, Or, Thoughts Upon the Love of Excelling and the Love of Excellence

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Rowland Hunter, 1820 - 173 sider

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Side 7 - I wist all their sport in the park is but a shadow to that pleasure that I find in Plato. Alas ! good folk, they never felt what true pleasure meant.
Side 4 - ... (a hill not to be commanded, and where the air is always clear and serene), and to see the errors, and wanderings, and mists, and tempests, in the vale below :'' so always that this prospect be with pity, and not with swelling or pride.
Side 139 - Who hath woe ? who hath sorrow ? who hath contentions? who hath babbling? who hath wounds without cause ? who hath redness of eyes ? They that tarry long at the wine ; they that go to seek mixed wine.
Side 60 - By bud of nobler race : this is an art Which does mend nature, change it rather, but The art itself is nature.
Side 121 - Sudden glory," is the passion which maketh those "grimaces" called "laughter"; and is caused either by some sudden act of their own, that pleaseth them ; or by the apprehension of some deformed thing in another, by comparison whereof they suddenly applaud themselves.
Side 1 - How charming is divine Philosophy! Not harsh and crabbed, as dull fools suppose, But musical as is Apollo's lute, And a perpetual feast of nectar'd sweets, Where no crude surfeit reigns.
Side 137 - O madness, to think use of strongest wines, And strongest drinks, our chief support of health, When God with these forbidden made choice to rear His mighty champion, strong above compare, Whose drink was only from the liquid brook ! Sams.
Side 123 - A jest's prosperity lies in the ear Of him that hears it, never in the tongue Of him that makes it...
Side 96 - Orpheus theatre; where all beasts and birds assembled, and forgetting their several appetites, some of prey, some of game, some of quarrel, stood all sociably together listening unto the airs and accords of the harp; the sound whereof no sooner ceased, or was drowned by some louder noise, but every beast returned to his own nature: wherein is aptly described the nature and condition of men; who are full of savage and unreclaimed desires, of profit, of lust, of revenge, which as long as they give...
Side 60 - But nature makes that mean: so, over that art Which you say adds to nature, is an art That nature makes. You see, sweet maid, we marry A...

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