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MEMBERS OF CONGRESS FROM 1820 TO I860.—Continued.

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W. A. Hall

John S. Rollins

John G. Scott, vice Noell...

John Hogan

Henry T. Blow

Thos. E. Noell

John R. Kelsoe

Joseph W. McClurg

Robert T. Van Horn

Benjamin F. Loan

John F. Benjamin

George W.Anderson

William A. Pile

C. A. Newcombe

Thomas E. Noell. deceased..

J.J. Gravely

Jos. W. McClurg, resigned

Robert T. Van Horn

Benjamin F. Loan

John F. Benjamin

George W. Anderson

J. R. McCormack, vice Noell John H. Stover,vice McClurg

Erastus Wells

G. A. Finkelnburg

J. R. McCormack

S. H. Boyd

Samuel S. Burdett

Robert T. Van Horn

Joel F. Asper

John F. Benjamin

David P. Dyer

Erastus Wells

G. A. Finkelnburg

J. R. McCormack

H. E. Havens

Samuel S. Burdett

A. Comingo

Isaac C. Parker

James G. Blair

Andrew King

E. O. Stanara

Erastus Wells

W. H. Stone

Robert A. Hatcher

Richard P. Bland

Harrison E. Havens

Thomas F. Crittenden

A Abram Comingo

Isaac C. Parker

Ira B. Hyde

John B. Clark, Jr

John M. Glover

A. H. Buckner

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< J5 B NAMES.

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1874 44 1 Edward C. Kerr

2 Erastus Wells

8 William H. Stone

4 Robert A. Hatcher

5 Richard P. Bland

6 Charles H. Morgan

7 John F. Philips

8 Benjamin J. Franklin

9 David Rea

10 Rezin A. DeBolt

11 John B. Clark, Jr

12 John M. Glover

13 Aylett H. Buckner

1876 45 1 Anthony Ittner

2 Nathan Cole

3 Lyne S. Metcalfe

4 Robert H. Hatcher

5 Richard P. Bland

6 Charles H. Morgan

7 Thos. T. Crittenden

8 Benjamin J. Franklin

9 David Rea

10 Henry M. Pollard

11 John B. Clark, Jr

12 John M. Glover

13 Aylett H. Buckner

1878 46 1 Martin L. Clardy

2 Erastus Wells

3 Richard G. Frost

4 Lowndes H. Davis

5 Richard P. Bland

6 James R. Waddill

7 Alfred M. Lay, died

1879 M 7 John F. Philips, vice Lay.

8 Samuel L. Sawyer

9 Nicholas Ford

10 Gideon F. Rothwell

11 John B. Clark, Jr

12 Wm. H- Hatch

18 Aylett H Buckner

1880 47 1 Alartin L. Clardy ..

2 Thomas Allen

3 Richard G. Frost

4 Lowndes H. Davis

5 Richard P. Bland

6 Ira S. Hazeltine

7 Theron M. Rice

8 Robert T. Van Horn

9 Nicholas Ford

10 J. H. Burroughs

11 John B. Clark, Jr

12 Wm. H. Hatch

13 Aylett H. Buckner

The election for members of the legislature and members of Congress occurs biennially on the Tuesday after the first Monday in November of the even numbered years—as 1880, 1882, etc.; and the legislature meets on the first Wednesday after January 1st, in the odd numbered years— as 1881, 1883, etc. The governor is elected every four years, at the same time with the presidential election.

EDUCATIONAL INTERESTS.

THE PUBLIC SCHOOL SYSTEM.

The State of Missouri has made liberal provision for the support of public schools, equal to any other state in the Union.' The main features of our school system are well epitomized in a report made by the state superintendent in 1879, as follows:

School Revenue—Is derived from invested state funds, bearing interest at the rate of six per cent per annum, and one-fourth of the state revenue collections, annually, equal to a tax of five cents on the $100 of valuation; from the invested county funds at rates from 6 to 10 per centum annually, secured by real estate mortgages; from the sixteenth section or township fund invested and producing income in the same manner as the county funds.

The state and township permanent funds arise principally from the sale of lands donated by the general government. The income is used only for teachers' wages, and is apportioned upon the number of children to districts having maintained the minimum term of school.

The deficiency is supplied by local taxation, limited in amount, and controlled in the first instance by boards of directors, and second, by the tax-payers in annual meeting assembled.

State Boards.State Board Of Education consists of the superintendent of public schools, the governor, secretary of state, and attorneygeneral. The duties, practically, are simply the investment and care of the state permanent fund.

Board Of Curators Of The State University — Consists of nine members, appointed by the governor, with the consent of the senate, tor a term of six years, three being appointed every two years. They control and manage the university, agricultural college and school of mines and metallurgy.

Boards Of Regents—Of normal schools consist of six members

* The first free day school ever opened in Missouri was by the Church of the Messiah, in St. Louis. This church was organized in 1834, by Rev. Wm. G. Elliott, D. D., who was the founder, and is now Chancellor of Washington University.

to each school, appointed by the governor, with consent of the senate, from the locality. The state superintendent of public schools is ex officio member of each board.

Boards Of Control — Of other institutions vary in name and number of members. They are usually appointed by the governor.

Superintendent Of Public Schools — Has general supervision of the public schools; collects and tabulates the school statistics of the state; apportions the state school funds to the counties; gives information to school officers upon construction of school law; prepares and furnishes blanks for use of school officers; spends five days in each congressional district of the state, yearly, consulting and advising teachers and other school officers, and delivering lectures; is a member of the board of regents of the normal schools, and president of state board of education; receives reports from the county commissioners and state institutions of learning; makes annual reports to the governor and general assembly alternately; and is the executive manager of the state school fund under the direction of state board of education.

County School Commissioners—Elected at the annual school meetings of the various school districts for the term of two years; compensation varies according to population of county, from twenty to forty dollars per annum and a fee, additional, of one and one-half dollars from each teacher undergoing examination; examines teachers, grants and revokes certificates; has final jurisdiction over appealed cases of changes of district boundaries, appealed from the annual meetings; condenses and reports to state superintendent of public schools the educational statistics of the county, as received by him from the district boards of directors; supplies the districts with copies of the law, and all blanks needed; performs any and all duties required by the State Superintendent, and in counties where the people have voted in favor of it, employs his whole time in supervision and school work.

Miscellaneous.—To draw public money, districts must maintain at least three months public school in each year, but the law requires and provides that four months shall be taught. Any person between the ages of six and twenty years may attend the public schools. In cities, towns and villages, the boards are authorized to hold from five to ten months term of school each year, and in the country districts the people may vote an extension of term over four months. The rate of taxation for school purposes, in addition to the distributed state, county and township, or sixteenth section funds, is limited to forty cents on the $100 valuation, except that the people, at the annual school meeting, may vote an increase not to exeed sixty-five cents on the $100, by a majority vote of tax-payers. To raise funds by taxation for building purposes, requires that the increased rate be voted by two-thirds of the qualified voters voting at the annual or special meeting.

Annual. School Meeting—Meets at the district school house annually, and elects a director for a full term, and fills vacancies in the board; determines the length of time in excess of four months, that the schools shall be kept open, and orders the proper levies within the limitations to be made therefor; votes a sum not exceeding $20 per annum for purchase of books for district library; decides for or against proposed changes of district boundary lines; directs the sale of property no longer required, and determines the applications of proceeds; designates their choice for county school commissioner every second year; directs the loan of money to aid in erecting school houses; directs the levy of tax for the erection of school houses; determines the location of the school house or houses; by a two-thirds vote changes location of school house; receives the reports of school district board as to financial condition, and itemized receipts and disbursements for the year ending.

District Boards —Consist of three members in the country districts, and six members in the city, town and village districts; each elected for a term of three years; one, annually, in the country, and two in the city, town and village districts; they elect one of their number president, and appoint a clerk who may not be a member of the board, if it so chooses; they are the executive officers of the school corporation, which each district is, being created by law; they serve without compensation; have custody of school property; execute the orders of the annual meeting; take the school census; make and file the estimates for tax levies; control the disbursements of all school money; keep the district records; visit the schools; employ teachers; provide for a four months term of school without consulting the people; make rules for organization, grading and government of the schools, suspend or expel pupils; admit and prescribe fees for non-resident pupils, and in general do all things necessary to carry on the schools.

In city, town and village districts the board has power to establish higher grades of schools, but are subject to the same tax restrictions.

Some cities have special charters giving other privileges than those enumerated, but subject to the same tax restrictions, they being constitutional provisions.

Educational Directory.— University of Missouri, located at Columbia; number of students, 577; legislative appropriation for 1879 and 1880, $39,000. State Agricultural College constitutes a department of the University. Three State Normal Schools, located respectively at Kirksville, Warrensburg and Cape Girardeau.* The appropriation to each of

* St. Louis supports its own normal school, for the preparation and training of its teachers, the greater number of whom are graduates of this normal school.

normal schools is $7,500 per annum. Deaf and Dumb Asylum, located at Fulton; legislative appropriation for 1879 and 1880, $91,000. Blind Asylum, located at St. Louis; legislative appropriation for 1879 and 1880, $46,000. Lincoln Institute, located at Jefferson City; legislative appropriation, $10,000 for 1879 and 1880; devoted to training colored teachers for colored public schools of the state. School of Mines and Metallurgy, located at Rolla; legislative appropriation, $15,000 for 1879 and 1880; constitutes a department of the state university. State teachers' association, meets annually at places selected at each session, during the last week in June.

Statistics Of 1878.— School population, 688,248; school enrollment, 448,033; No. of ungraded school districts, 8,142; No. of graded school districts, 279. No. of school houses, 8,092; estimated value of school houses and sites, $8,321,399; average school year in months, 5; average school year in months, in graded school districts, 9; total number of teachers employed, 11,268; total wages of teachers, $2,320,430.20; average wages of teachers per month, males, $36.36, females, $28.09; average wages of teachers per month, in grades schools, estimated, males, $87.81, females, $40.73.

Revenue.—From interest on state permanent fund, $174,030.15; from one-fourth state revenue collections, $363,276.32; from county and township permanent funds, $440,191.37; from district taxes, $2,446,910.71. Total, $3,424,408.55.

Permanent Funds.—State fund, $2,909,457.11; county fund, $2,388^368.29; township or sixteenth section fund, $1,980,678.51. Total $7,278,046.80.

The state auditor's report for 1879 and 1880 furnishes the following school items; and they make a very favorable showing for the public school interests of Missouri:

1879. 1880.

Amount distributed to the counties $502,795.18 $515,286.09

Maintenance of State University 19,500.00 19,500.00

support of Lincoln Institute 5,000.00 5,000.00

Support School of Mines and Metallurgy 7,500.00 7,500.00

.Normal SchooL 1st district 7,500.00 7,500'00

""2d" 7,500.00 7,500.00

""South Missouri district 7,500,00 7,500.00

Distribution of school laws 308.58 436.50

*Lincoln Institute was first projected by the 62d Regiment U. S. Colored Infantry, while on duty in Texas, in 1365, and was designed for the higher education of colored people. In January, 1866, the state attached a state normal department to it, to provide suitable teachers for the public schools for colored children. The school was opened Sept. 17, 1876, but was not finally provided for by law as a state normal school until Feb. 14, 1870, since which time it has gone steadily forward and done a good work for the negro population.

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