The Life and Works of William Cowper: Now First Completed by the Introduction of His "Private Correspondence.", Volum 7

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Saunders and Otley, 1835

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Side 38 - Tis pleasant, through the loopholes of retreat, To peep at such a world ; to see the stir Of the great Babel, and not feel the crowd ; To hear the roar she sends through all her gates At a safe distance, where the dying sound Falls a soft murmur on th
Side 226 - as loud as he could bawl. Away went Gilpin, who but he! his fame soon spread around; "He carries weight! He rides a race! "Tis for a thousand pound!
Side 249 - Bleeding from the Roman rods, Sought, with an indignant mien, Counsel of her country's gods ; Sage...
Side 351 - Though duly from my hand he took His pittance every night, He did it with a jealous look, And, when he could, would bite. His diet was of wheaten bread, And milk, and oats, and straw ; Thistles, or lettuces instead, With sand to scour his maw. On twigs of hawthorn he regaled, On pippins' russet peel, And, when his juicy salads fail'd, Sliced carrot pleased him well.
Side 184 - Then shifting his side, as a lawyer knows how, He pleaded again in behalf of the Eyes, But what were his arguments few people know, For the court did not think they were equally wise. So his lordship decreed, with a grave solemn tone, Decisive and clear, without one if or but, — That whenever the Nose put his spectacles on, By daylight or candlelight — Eyes should be shut.
Side 225 - The wind did blow, the cloak did fly like streamer long and gay, Till, loop and button failing both, at last it flew away. Then might all people well discern the bottles he had slung; A bottle swinging at each side, as hath been said or sung. The dogs did bark, the children screamed, up flew the windows all, And every soul cried out,
Side 223 - Where they did all get in ; Six precious souls, and all agog To dash through thick and thin.
Side 180 - I AM monarch of all I survey, My right there is none to dispute ; From the centre all round to the sea I am lord of the fowl and the brute.
Side 66 - The verdure of the plain lies buried deep Beneath the dazzling deluge ; and the bents And coarser grass, upspearing o'er the rest, Of late unsightly and unseen, now shine Conspicuous, and in bright apparel clad, And fledged with icy feathers, nod superb. The cattle mourn in corners where the fence Screens them, and seem half-petrified to sleep In unrecumbent sadness.
Side 99 - THERE is in souls a sympathy with sounds, And as the mind is pitch'd the ear is pleased With melting airs or martial, brisk or grave. Some chord in unison with what we hear Is touch'd within us, and the heart replies.

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