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mination to a widowhood which commenced in so unfortunate a manner. Thomas de Grenville died in 1402, and Richard, his son and successor, made his will in London in 1419, before going to the wars with Henry V. He bequeaths to his wife Christian all his lands and tenements in Wotton, with remainder to his children by her, and in default to his own right heirs for ever.

His lands in Hoddenham he leaves in fee to Eustace his son. He gives his wife all his personal estate, and charges her to do for his son what she would desire him likewise to do for hers. To each of his two executors he leaves a legacy of £5. He died before the 1st of June 1427, but his widow Christian was alive in 1453, and by her will (in Latin) gives a legacy to her daughter Agnes, and the residue of her chattels to her son John. The eldest son, Eustace de Grenville, was among the chief gentry of Buckinghamshire who took an oath to observe the laws made in 1433 in Parliament. He was twice married, outlived his second wife, and died in 1480, having the year before made his will at Wotton, bequeathing to his son Richard £10, to his son Eustace £6, his estate at Hoddenham, and lands there for life. The residue of his personal property he leaves in trust, to be disposed of for the good of his soul. Richard de Grenville succeeded to the family property at Wotton, and exchanged the manor of Ascot, in Oxfordshire, with Robert Dormer, Esq., for Burwell's Manor, in Wotton, which Robert Dormer had purchased, and which was part of the Grenville family estates that had passed away as the marriage-portion of Alice de Grenville, daughter of Sir Eustace. Richard de Grenville (or, as the family began now to be called, “Grenville” simply) died the

8th of October 1517, having made his will the same day, by which he bequeaths each of his daughters £80 as a marriage-portion; to his younger son George his house at Chipping-Wycombe, called the George, and all his lands in Berkshire, with reversion of rents in Stoke-Talmage, in Oxfordshire, after the decease of his brother Eustace, the tenant for life, to the said George and the heirs of his body, and in default to his other son Edward and the heirs of his body, remainder to his own right heirs. He leaves the residue of his effects to Joane his wife and Edward his son, to be disposed of for the health of his soul. By the inquisition after his death it appears he died possessed, besides the above property, of an estate at Chelmescote, near Brailes, in Warwickshire. This Edward Grenville was in 1527 Sheriff of Buckinghamshire and Bedfordshire. By his will, dated the 2d of March 1536, he leaves annuities to his younger sons, Richard, George, and Ralph, until they come of age, and directs part of his property to be allowed to accumulate for their benefit till they attain to the age of twenty-three. He died on the 14th of April in the same year, leaving his son and heir Edward twelve years of age. Edward the younger married and had a child, who died in infancy; and on his own death, October 31, 1587, the family estates at Wotton, &c., passed to his next brother, Richard, then about thirty-five years of age. Richard had several children, and died November 7, 1604. His eldest son, Edward, had died before him, unmarried, at Carthagena, having commanded the Swallow, pinnace, and afterwards the Thomas, bark, under Sir Francis Drake; and he was succeeded by his next son, Richard Grenville, who died in 1618, leaving four sons, the eldest of whom, Richard, born August 8, 1612, succeeded his father in the family estates. In 1641 he was Sheriff of Buckinghamshire, and in 1642 one of the DeputyLieutenants of the county, along with John Hampden, Arthur Goodwin, and Bulstrode Whitelocke. He warmly espoused the Parliament's cause, being essentially country gentleman, and commanded a troop of horse in the Parliamentary army in 1643 and 1644. In 1646 he was one of the Justices of the Peace for the county under the same authority, together with Edward Grenville, his younger brother. He also sat for the county in the Protectoral Parliaments of 1654, 1656, and 1658, and was succeeded in January 1666 by his son Richard, who was sheriff of the county in 1671. He married a daughter of Sir Peter Temple, of Stanton-Berry, Buckinghamshire, and had by her a son and three daughters, the youngest of whom, Penelope, married Sir John Conway, and was celebrated in the poems of Granville, Lord Lansdowne, for her beauty and accomplishments. Richard Grenville was succeeded by his son Richard, who purchased estates, sat for Windsor and Bucks, and crowned the slowgrowing fortunes of his family by a marriage with Hester, daughter of Sir Richard Temple, of STOWE, near Buckingham.

The Temple family, remarkable for several eminent men, was certainly one of the older English families. Their pedigree-makers go so far as to claim for them a lineal descent from Leofric, Earl of Chester or Leicester, in the time of King Ethelbald, 716. They give as the origin of their name “Temple,” in Leicestershire, where there was a family of that name. It is sufficient for our purpose that in the reign of Edward VI. a Peter Temple was the owner of Stowe, married Millicent, daughter of William Jekyll, of Newington, Middlesex, and had by her two sons, from the elder of whom, John, descended the heiress who made the fortunes of the Grenvilles ; and from the younger, Anthony, descended Sir John Temple (Master of the Rolls, Commissioner of the Great Seal, and Commissioner of Government in Ireland during the reign of Charles I., the Commonwealth, and the Protectorate), the celebrated Sir William Temple, and the Viscounts Palmerston, of whom the present Premier is the most distinguished representative. Sir Peter Temple, second baronet, the descendant of John, the elder son of Peter Temple, of Stowe, was the High Sheriff of Bucks, to whom the Ship-money Writ was addressed which John Hampden resisted, and Sir Peter himself got into trouble with the King for not enforcing arrears. He represented Buckingham in the two last Parliaments of Charles, was an ardent adherent of the Puritan party, and was nominated one of the judges to try the King, but never sat. By his second wife, Christian, sister of Sir Richard Leveson, of Trentham, he had a son, Richard, who succeeded him in the baronetcy, and was a distinguished member of the country party in the reign of Charles II. Voting for the exclusion of the Duke of York, he was put out of the commission of the peace by James II. on his accession, joined in the Revolution, and voted for declaring the throne vacant in the Convention Parliament. He had only one surviving son, the eldest, Richard, who succeeded him as fourth Baronet. One of the younger daughters, Christian, married Sir Thomas Lyttelton, and was the of whom, Richard, born August 8, 1612, succeeded his father in the family estates. In 1641 he was Sheriff of Buckinghamshire, and in 1642 one of the DeputyLieutenants of the county, along with John Hampden, Arthur Goodwin, and Bulstrode Whitelocke. He warmly espoused the Parliament's cause, being essentially country gentleman, and commanded a troop of horse in the Parliamentary army in 1643 and 1644. In 1646 he was one of the Justices of the Peace for the county under the same authority, together with Edward Grenville, his younger brother. He also sat for the county in the Protectoral Parliaments of 1654, 1656, and 1658, and was succeeded in January 1666 by his son Richard, who was sheriff of the county in 1671. He married a daughter of Sir Peter Temple, of Stanton-Berry, Buckinghamshire, and had by her a son and three daughters, the youngest of whom, Penelope, married Sir John Conway, and was celebrated in the poems of Granville, Lord Lansdowne, for her beauty and accomplishments. Richard Grenville was succeeded by his son Richard, who purchased estates, sat for Windsor and Bucks, and crowned the slowgrowing fortunes of his family by a marriage with Hester, daughter of Sir Richard Temple, of STOWE, near Buckingham.

The Temple family, remarkable for several eminent men, was certainly one of the older English families. Their pedigree-makers go so far as to claim for them a lineal descent from Leofric, Earl of Chester or Leicester, in the time of King Ethelbald, 716. They give as the origin of their name “Temple,” in Leicestershire, where there was a family of that name. It is sufficient for our purpose that in the reign of Ed

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