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OF THE

COMMONWEALTH

OF

K EN TU CK Y.

BY MANN BUTLER, A. M.

LOUISVILLE, KY.:
PUBLISHED BY WILCOX, DICKERMAN AND CO.
PRINTED BY J. A. JAMES, CINCINNATI, OHIO.

1834.

Cheu
May

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Entered according to act of Congress, in the year 1834, by

MANN BUTLER, A. M.,
in the Clerk's Office of the District Court of Kentucky.

Stereotyped by J. A. James, Cincinnati

TO

GENERAL WILLIAM CLARK,

OF THE

STATE OF MISSOURI.

SIR:

Among the numerous friends whom the undertaking of the History of Kentucky has procured for me, I know of no one who has conferred such signal obligations upon me, as yourself. The papers of your illustrious brother, George Rogers Clark, so liberally placed by you in my hands, have shed most curious and interesting lights upon the affairs of the western country; and particularly of Kentucky. These could have been procured from no other source.

To whom then, can I so well dedicate this History, as to yourself, who have so faithfully preserved some of the most precious memorials of our history, and have so kindly contributed them for the public information? Were this not the case, who is so properly the representative of the pre-eminent founder of Kentucky, and the successful negotiator for its Virginia acknowledgement, as his only surviving brother?

After yourself, allow me to associate your ancient friend in arms, General William H. Harrison, as one to whom the author is next most deeply indebted, for interesting illustrations of the early military movements of your common commander, General Wayne, as well as for the elucidation of some of the obscure vicissitudes of Indian history.

Be pleased then, to accept the dedication of this work, as a testimonial of my high and unfeigned sense of the obligations conferred upon the great community of the west, much more than on my humble self, in your generous co-operation with my historical labors. In the interim I have the honor to remain Your obliged friend,

MANN BUTLER.

CONTENTS.

(page 1.

CHAPTER I.

Earliest condition of Kentucky-Troquois, or Mohawks, known in 1603--Early seats-

Progress to the Mississippi and the Illinois-Appeal to the Colonial Commissioners
General Braddock's talk--Treaties with the English Great trealy of 1768_Opinion
of Supreme Court on Indian litle-Opinions of General Harrison--Treaties of 1774
1775—1785 1795 and 1818.

CHAPTER II.

Policy of the British Government-Proclamation of 1763_Violations of it_Visit of Dr.

Walker in 1747-Name the Shawanee river, Cumberland - Visit of John Finley-of

Daniel Boone-Long hunters--Visit of Capt. Thomas Bullitt and McAfees-Surveys

of Louisville-Simon Kenton-Burning of Hendricks,Adventures of the McAfees-
James Harrod settles Harrodsburg-Battle of Point Pleasant--Treaty of 1774—Treaty

of 1775_Settlement of Boonesborough and St. Asaphs-Indian method of siege.

(page 17.

CHAPTER III.

First visit of Clark to Kentucky-Visits Harrodstown-Chosen a delegate to the Vir.

ginia Legislature with Gabriel John Jones--Calls on Governor Henry--Receives

gunpowder for_Kentucky-Procures the creation of Kentucky county-Brings gun-
powder from Fort Pitt-Conceals it on the banks of Limestone creek-- Blackfish

attacks Harrodstown--Singular escape of Ray---Plans approved by Governor and

Council-Spies in Illinois--Arrives at the Falls of Ohio--Eclipse of the Sun-Passes

the Falls—Reaches Kaskaskia-Surprises the town—Takes Cahokia.

[page 35

CHAPTER IV.

Plan against St. Vincents Thanks of Virginia–St. Vincents revolts from the British

M. Girault-Ilinois county-Negotiations with New Orleans-Indian negotiations.

(page 58.

CHAPTER V.

Recapture of St. Vincents hy the British---Plans a ainst Americans---French volunteers

March to St. Vincents----Capture.--- Return to Kaskaskia.

[page 79.

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