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CONTENTS TO VOL. XV.

THE LEXICON. Dr. RICHARDSON.
ASIATIC GEOGRAPHY, MYTHOLOGY, AND STATISTICS. AFRICAN GEOGRAPHY. The Rev. GEORGE CECIL

RENOUARD, M.A., F.L.S., late Fellow of Sidney-Sussex College, Cambridge.
EUROPEAN AND AMERICAN GEOGRAPHY. BRITISH COUNTIES. THOMAS MYERS, Esq., LL.D.
BOTANY. CHARLES LUSH, Esq., F.L.S.
ZOOLOGY. VERTEBRALS J. F. SOUTH, Esq., F.L.S., Lecturer on Anatomy at St. Thomas's Hospital.
ZOOLOGY. INVERTEBRALS. Thomas BELL, Esq., F.L.S.
MINERALOGY. HENRY JAMES BROOKE, Esq., F.R.S., F.L.S.
LAW. R. WHITCOMBE, Esq., M.A., Trinity College, Cambridge.
ATMOSPHERE. ATTRACTION. BALANCE. BALLAST. BAROMETER. BELLOWS. BINNACLE. BLAST

BLASTING. BLOCK. BODIES. BOLT-DRAWING. BORING-MACHINE. BREAKWATER. PETER BARLOW,

Esq., F.R.S., Royal Military Academy, Woolwich.
BIBLE. BIBLICIST. BIBLIOGRAPHY. BIBLIOMANCY, BIBLIOTHECA. BLOCK-BOOKS. BOOKBINDING.

BREVIARY. The Rev. THOMAS HARTWELL HORNE, M.A., St. John's College, Cambridge.

BAPTISM. BAPTIST. BISHOP. The Rev. Archdeacon HALE.

BATHING. BILE. BITTERS. BLINDNESS. BLOOD. DAVID UWINS, M.D.

BANK. BASALT. The Right Rev. Bishop RUSSELL.
BASTILE. The Rev. PHILJP Bliss, D.D., St John's College, Oxford, Registrar of the University.

BRICK. BRIDGE. JAMES ELMES, Esq.

ATHEIST. ATOM. The Venerable WILLIAM ROE LYALL, A.M., Archdeacon of Colchester, Trinity College, Cambridge.

ASTROLOGY. ATHENS. ATLANTIS. AUGUR. AUTOMATON. BACCHUS. BALLAD. BARD. BARROW.

BEARD. BELIDES. BELL. BELLEROPHON. BELLONA. BENEVOLENCE. BERYL. BEZOAR.
BLEMMYES. BONA DEA. BOOTES. BOREAS. BOW, BRANCHIDÆ. BRAWL. BREHON. BRIAREUS.
and the BRITISH TOPOGRAPHY. The EDITOR.

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profession of uncommon sanctity and virtue, which TICK. e faith- they supposed to consist in self-denial and mortifica

ASCITA. nde, to tion. They considered it an act of great merit to t their

deny theinselves the use of those things which were d.

esteemed lawful for all other Christians to enjoy, and ge.

held it as an indispensable duty to undergo continual non, abstinence, and to subject themselves to the most eties

severe discipline. Their object was, by raising the ain soul above all external objects and all sensual plea

sures, to enjoy a nearer communion with God on

earth, and, after the dissolution of their mortal
The bodies, to ascend to the supreme centre of happiness

and perfection, unretarded by the impurities and im.
perfections which debase mankind in general. (Mo-
sheim Eccl. Hist. cent. ii. part 2.) The appellation
was also given to those who were more than ordina-
rily intent on the exercises of prayer and devotion,
and hence St. Cyril, of Jerusalem, calls the prophetess
Anna, “who departed not from the temple, but
served God night and day,” ασκήτρια ευλαβεστάτη,
' a most religious ascetic. In the present day, by
Ascetics we understand those who retire from the
onversation and pleasures of the world, and pass
heir time in religious mortification, although in the
imitive ages such as pretended to this title were
en of active life, living in society, and differing
m the rest of mankind only in their exact adherence
the rules of virtue and forbearance inculcated in
gospel.
SCHARIANS, v. ASHARIANS.
SCHBILIA, v. SEVILLA.
CIDIA, in Zoology, a genus of the class Tuni-

order Disjuncta. Generic character; body en-
ed in a double tunic; fixed to marine bodies
a base. Exterior tunic somewhat coriaceous,
g an irregular ovate, or cylindrical sac, per-
above by two unequal foramina, one lower
e other. The interior, or proper, tunic, en-
the body, not entirely filling the external sac,
h it is united only at the foramina.
nimals of this genus were by Linnæus consi-
analogous to those inhabiting bivalve shells;
: by subsequent naturalists been generally
with the mollusca. Cuvier appears to have
this opinion; and in order more completely
strate the analogy, compares the external
the shell of the acephalous mollusca. But

no real analogy between sub-
of

ssentially distinct: the one an unorganiz-
is covering, serving only the purposes
n and muscular attachment; the other
ll the indications of a truly organized
id appearing, as Lamarck observes, even
its internal surface. The comparative
e animals is not less distinct, when fol-

o a more detailed investigation. La-
a riche

refore, very properly arranged them in

3. The species of Ascidia are rather H

several of them are natives of the

Britain.
TO

biratical tribe, on the southern coast
r vessels were rafts, fixed on inflated
eir name from dokos a bladder); their
"rows; their food, the berries of the
es of zizyphus); they were naked,

The Arabian geographers observe,

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ASCEND.

ASCARIS. ASCARIS, in Zoology, a genus of the class Vermes ; Aneas now, and wretched Dido eke order Rigiduli. Generic character ; body elongated,

To the forest a hunting minde to wende ASCEND. round, often attenuated at the extremities; three

To morne, as soon as Titan shall ascend,

And with his beames hath vuerspred the world. valves at the anterior extremity. Mouth terminal,

Surrey.
minute, covered by the valves.

He kept his patient a ful gret del
The numerous species of which this genus is com-

In loures by his magike naturel.
posed, inhabit the intestines of various animals, living

Wel coude he fortunen the ascendant
upon the mucus which lines their internal surface.

Of his images for his patient.
The three valves at the mouth, which are to be con-

Chaucer. The Prologue, vol. i. p.

18. sidered as a distinctive generic character, appear to

He loketh the coniunctions,

He loketh the recepcions, perform the office of lips, to assist the animal in fixing

His signe, his houre, his ascendent,
itself to the surface, and in sucking its nourishment.

And draweth fortune of his assent.
They are found not only in the intestines of man,

Gower. Con. Am. book vi.
and of the higher classes of animals, but in those

I made a sermoun of alle thingis that ihesus bigan to do and to also of reptiles, and even of other worms.

The sexes

teche into the dai of his ascencioun, in which he commaundide bi are distinct and the female is oviparous. The most the liooli goost to hise apostlis whiche he hadde closun. important species, because the only one which infects

Wiclif. Dedis of Aposlis, ch. i. the human body, is Ascaris lumbricoides, the A. ver- He commaunded his brother, L. Manlius, from the south-west micularis of Linnæus being referred to the genus him in charge that if he met with any daungerous places, stcepe

to get up the hill, as the place would permit with safetie, giving Oryurus. Ascaris lumbricoides is not less than from 6

and hard of ascent, that hee should not wrestle with the difficulties
inches to nearly a foot in length, of a whitish colour, of the ground, nor strive against things, which to force and
shining, and somewhat hard and rigid in its structure. overcome were unpossible.

Holland's Livy.
ASCE'ND,
Ascendo, from ad, and scando,

The stairs were then let down, whether to dare
AscE'NDANT, n.
(of uncertain etymology) to go

The fiend by easie ascent, or aggravate
Asce'ndant, adj. up to. In Wiclif, To stigh up.

His sad exclusion from the dores of bliss.

Milton's Par. Lost, book iii.
AscE'NDANCY, To go, come, move upwards,
AscE'NSION, to climb, to mount, to rise, to On the morow being the third dai of January, and Saturday, in
AscE'NSIVE, become higher, more elevated, a fayre playne on black heth, more nerer the foote of shoters hyl

then the ascendent of the hyll called black heth hyl, was pitched
Asce'nt.
superior.

a riche cloth of gold.

Hall. Henry the ITII,
By nature he knew eche ascentioun

Here's a prophet that I brought with me
of the equinoctial in thilke toun;

From forth the streets of Pomfret, whom I found
For whan degrees fiftene were ascended,

With many hundreds trading on his heeles :
Than crew he, that it might not ben amended.

To whom he sung in rude harsh sounding rimes,
Chaucer. The Nonnes Prestes Tale, vol. ii. p. 176.

That ere the next Ascension day at noone,

Your Highness should deliuer vp your crowne.
Eneas and vnsilly Dido baith tuay

Shakespeare's hing John, fol. 15.
To forest gratbis in hunting furth to wend,
To marrow als fast as Titan dois ascend,

Hee hath deserued worthily of his country, and his assent is
And ouer the warld gan his bemes spred.

not by such easie degrees as those, who hauing bcene supple and
Douglas Eneados, book iv. p. 104. courteous to the people. Shakespeare's Coriolanus, fol. 10.

VOL. XVIII.

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