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OF

FIELD MARSHAL

THE DUKE OF WELLINGTON,

DURING HIS VARIOUS CAMPAIGNS

IN

INDIA, DENMARK, PORTUGAL, SPAIN, THE LOW

COUNTRIES, AND FRANCE,

FROM

1799 TO 1818.

COMPILED FROM OFFICIAL AND AUTHENTIC DOCUMENTS,

BY

LIEUT. COLONEL GURWOOD,

ESQUIRE TO HIS GRACE AS KNIGHT OF THE BATH,

VOLUME THE SECOND.

A NEW EDITION.

LONDON:

JOHN MURRAY, ALBEMARLE STREET.

MDCCCXXXVII.

226.1.697.

LONDON: PRINTED BY WILLIAM CLOWES AND SONS,

Stamford Street,

THE EARLY SERVICES

OP

FIELD MARSHAL THE DUKE OF WELLINGTON,

IN

INDIA.

WITH THE OFFICIAL AND OTHER DISPATCHES.

To Colonel Murray. · SIR,

Camp, 12th June, 1803*. 'I am sorry to hear so bad an account of the pontoons. I suspected that the roads would not be very good when the rains commenced ; and for that reason, as well as because I expect that the rivers will fill between the 14th and 20th, I wished that the pontoons should leave Panwell on the 8th, at latest.

• You have done every thing you could do; and I dare say that when Lient. Goodfellow shall arrive at Panwell, many of the difficulties of which Captain Young complains will be removed.

When we quitted Poonah, Captain Graham was advancing rapidly with the soucars; and I make no doubt but that in a short time he will have been able to procure from them a sufficient supply for this body of troops; and I hoped that your paymaster would be able to make equal progress.

You should not confine your dealings to one soucar. Open a communication with every soucar in Poonah, and take money

from any man who will give it to you for bills * Memorial addressed to the Maharajah Dowlut Rao Scindiah by Lieut. Colonel

Collins, Chickley, 12th June, 1803. When Colonel Collins had the honor of an audience with Maharajah Dowlut Rao Scindiah, on the 6th of Safter (28th May), the Colonel, by order of his Excellency the Most Noble the Governor General, urged many cogent reasons and persuasions to induce the Maharajah to declare, without delay or reserve, whether the late negotiations carried on between his court, the Rajah of Berar, and Jeswunt Rao Holkar, had been entered into for the purpose of obstructing the completion VOL. II.

B

upon Calcutta, Benares, Lucknow, or Madras ; I can send

them to you.

If

you find that you cannot get on with the shroffs, you must write to Mr. Duncan, and press him to send you money.

. He will be able to do so, as I know that lately the state of the finances at Bombay has considerably mended ; but if you want cash immediately for the purchase of the bullocks I mentioned to you in my letter, there is money of mine in the hands of Lieut. Colonel Close, for which you may call for this purpose, in proportion as you may want it.

of the engagements lately concluded at Bassein between his Highness the Peshwah and the British Government.

‘But although Colonel Collins was extremely urgent with the Maharajah to give him instant information on this important point, and although the Colonel particularly pointed out the line of conduct which the British Government would be compelled to pursue, should the required explanation be withheld, yet the ministers of this durbar repeatedly declared that Colonel Collins must not expect any satisfactory answer to this question until a meeting had taken place between the Maharajah and the Rajah of Berar. Maharajah Dowlut Rao Scin: diah also said, that he could not, without a violation of his faith, give Colonel Collins the satisfaction he demanded, until he (the Maharajah) had conversed with Ragojee Bhoonslah; but that after his interview with that Rajah, the Colonel should be informed whether there would be peace or war.

. The proposed conference between Maharajah Dowlut Rao Scindiah and the Rajah of Berar having taken place, Colonel Collins now expects that the Maharajah will, conformably to his promise, explicitly declare whether it is his design to obstruct the completion of the treaty of Bassein, either by means of his own power, or in conjunction with Ragojee Bhoons lah and Jeswunt Rao Holkar ; and Colonel Collins further requires that Maharajah Dowlut Rao Scindiah will state, without reserve, whether it be his present wish and intention to maintain and preserve the relations of friendship which have so long subsisted between his sirdar and the British Government.

' Finally, in performance of his duty, Colonel Collins apprizes the Maharajah, that should he now refuse or delay to give explicit answers to the foregoing questions, and continue with his army south of the Nerbudda, such refusal or delay will be regarded by his Excellency as an arowal of hostile designs on the part of this court against the British Government: Colonel Collins therefore hopes that motives of moderation and justice, as well as a proper sense of his own interests, will induce Maharajah Dowlut Rao Scindiah to act on the present occasion conformably with the relations of amity which have so long subsisted between the two states, and which have never been violated on the part of the English, and consistently with the declaration that he (the Maharajah) made to the Colonel on the 29th of Zeacadeh (24th March): but should the Maharajah decline giving Colonel Collins the satisfaction which he now demands, in this case the Colonel requests that Maharajah Dowlut Rao Scindiah will furnish him with a party of horse to escort him as far as Aurungabad, together with supplies of grain sufficient for the subsistence of his sepoys and followers, until their arrival at that city.

*J, Collins.

• I have bought twenty-seven camels to carry the camp equipage of the 78th regiment, which I propose should be paid for by the government of Bombay. The people from whom I bought them have paid the money into my treasury, and have desired to have a bill upon Poonah for it: I have complied with their request, and have given them a bill for 4700 Chandory rupees upon Captain Matheson. If it will distress Captain Matheson to pay this bill, you may also take that sum from Colonel Close. But the expense of these camels will appear hereafter in Captain Matheson's accounts, and if he has that money he may as well pay it at present.

I have the honor to be, &c. * Colonel Murray.'

ARTHUR WELLESLEY.

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To Lieut. Colonel Maxwell. DEAR COLONEL,

*13th June, 1803. • I do not clearly comprehend the object of the papers which you showed me last night, and I wish to have it explained to me.

In consequence of a representation from the officers of the cavalry, made by Colonel Dallas, I obtained the permission of the Commander in Chief, that a limited expense should be incurred for forage for their horses, when the corps should be placed in situations where it might be impossible for the grass cutters to supply the necessary quantity; and I issued orders upon the subject on the 3rd of June, in which, in obedience to the orders of the Commander in Chief, I limited the period that the public should pay to those days I thought the grass cutters might have found it difficult to procure

to procure the necessary supply of forage. • It appears, however, that notwithstanding the people attached to the gun bullocks procured forage for them, and that two hundred pioneers employed to cut grass for the carriage bullocks procured forage for these animals, the officers commanding troops continued to purchase forage for the horses during the time the troops were encamped near Chinchore.

• It is my opinion that the grass cutters ought also to have procured forage for the horses in the same situation; an opinion in which I am happy to find that you most fully agree; and that being the case, I cannot allow additional

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