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TABLE VI.-SHOWING THE ELASTIC FORCE OF AQUEOUS VAPOUR,

IN INCHES OF MERCURY, FROM 0° TO 80°, calculated from the Experiments of Regnault.

From Mr Glaisher's Hygrometric Tables.

The intermediate tenths of degrees may be easily interpolated.

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TABLE VII.-FACTORS FOR MULTIPLYING THE EXCESS OF THE

DRY-BULB THERMOMETER OVER THAT OF THE WET-BULB, TO
FIND THE EXCESS OF THE TEMPERATURE OF THE AIR ABOVE
THAT OF THE DEW-POINT,

From Mr Glaisher's Hygrometric Tables.

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TABLE VIII.- FOR COMPARING THE PRESSURE AND THE VELO

CITY OF THE WIND. Calculated from the Formulæ, V2 x .005 =P; and v 200 P = V.

From Instructions for taking Meteorological Observations, by

Colonel Sir Henry James, R.E., F.R.S., &c.

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I N D E X.

The figures, unless where otherwise expressed, refer to the paragraphs of the text,

and not to the pages of the Volume.

ABERCROMBIE, Hon. Ralph, 655.
Adie, J., travelling barometer, 36.
Adie, R., conservatory hygrometer, 321.
Adie, A., sympiesometer, 44.
Abnormal temperatures, 275; caused

by ocean-currents, 233. Air-thermometer, invention of, 7. America, influence of its large lakes on

the climate, 209, 267. Anemometers, 440. Aneroid barometer, 43. Anthelia, or glories of light, 625. Aqueous vapour as disturbing influence

on the atmosphere, 116. Arago on lightning, 589; neutral point

of polarisation, 635; on moon's influ

ence on weather, 649. Aristotle On Meteors,' Athenæum, suggestion by a writer in,

25. Atmometer, 310. Atmosphere, drying power of the,

311; height deduced from meteors, 642; from polarisation, 639; mode of

measuring the pressure, 50. Atmospheric pressure, distribution over

the globe, Chap. III. ; its relation to temperature, winds, rain, &c., passim; methods of representing it in storms, 499-501; its irregular distri

bution in storms, 521. Aurora borealis, 605; height, 607, rela

tion to terrestrial magnetism, 606, 609; to storms, 611; distribution over

the earth, 606. BABINET's neutral point of polarisation,

636. Babington, T. H., 665. Bacon, Lord, 483. Baddeley on dust-whirlwinds, 602. Baker, Sir S. W., inundation of the

Nile, 470; dust-whirlwinds of Nubia, Balfour, Professor J. H., 539. Ballingall, R., 655.

Ballot, Dr Buys, 17, 87; LAW OF THE

WINDS, 517; apparent exceptions to,

520, 521, 522; 564, 674, Barker, Sir R., 210. Barometer, invention, 6; description of,

27 ; neutral point of, 34; mode of removing from place to place, and of expelling air from, 37; must be hung perpendicularly, 38; scales, 51; reducing to 32°, 47; correction for height, 52; example showing method of redncing, 61 ; daily variation, 63 ; do. of dry air, 69; annual variation, 75; corrections for range, their use and abuse, 73, 74; variations, where large, 77 ; low in storms not the effect of centrifugal force, 565 ; extraordinary fluctuations in tropical storms, 540; table comparing millimetres with English inches, page 357; and Table III., Paris lines with English

inches, page 358. Barometric gradient, 531, 532. Barometric measurement of heights, 62. Barometric tubes, use of air-trap in, 36. Bates, Rev. J. Chadwick, observations

with rain-gauges, 396. Baxendell, Joseph, 512 ; on moon's in

fluence on atmospheric temperature,

652. Becquerel and Breschet's experiments

of electricity, 583. Bennet's electrometer, 580. Berigny, 615. Beverley, Rev. A., proportion of rain

fall at Aberdeen with different winds,

412. Black-bulb thermometer (naked), 187,

189, 198. Black showers, 479. Blodget's remarks on rainfall of Ame

rica, 415.
Bohenenberger's electroscope, 581.
Bora, 497.
Borrowing days, 294.
Boussingault, 182.

602.

Brewster, Sir David, on daily march of

temperature, 145; causes which inter-
fere with it, 146, 151; polarisation of

the atmosphere, 637 et seq.
Brewster's neutral point of polarisation,

637.
Bridge of Allan, advantages as a winter

and spring resort, 157.
British Islands, suminer temperature,

273; chart showing, page 121; winter
temperature, 263 ; where best for in-

valids, 264.
Brough, 622.
Bryce, Dr James, 353.
Buzzard, H.M.S., 570.
Bulletin' International, 24.
Burckhardt, 490.
Calms in storms, 526; region of, 453.
Capacity, error of, in barometer, 34; of

air for vapour in relation to tempera-

ture, 320.
Capillarity in barometer, error of, 33.
Casella's mercurial minimum thermome-

ter, 132.
Caswell, Professor Alexis, 575.
Cavallo's electrometer, 580.
Celsius's thermometer, 121.
Chatfield, Commander, 540, 547, 550.
Chrimes's, R., observations with rain-

gauges, 397.
Cistern barometers, 32.
Climate influenced by great specific

heat of water, 184; intluenced by
maximum densities of fresh and salt
water, 207; currents of the sea, 241;
sheets of shallow and deep water
respectively, 267 ; winds, 268; moun-
tain-ranges, 269 ; vegetation, 179;
forests, 180, 218, 352; sandy deserts,

178.
Climates, insular and continental, 270;

extreme, their effect on the death-rate,

274.
Clouds, general causes, 358; apparently

resting on hills, cause of, 356; formed
at junction of valleys, 353; classifica-
tion, 369; cirrus, 370 ; its relation to
storms, and value as a prognostic,
371 ; cumulus, 375; cause of their
shape, 376; stratus, 378; cirro-cumu-
lus, 380; cirro-stratus, 382; cumulo-
stratus, 385; cumulo - cirro-stratus,
386 ; pocky cloud, 655; mode of ob-
serving, 389; height, 367; colours;
628 ; velocity of clouds, 391; relation
to storms, 514, and auroras, 612.
Clouston's, Rev. Dr C., description of

natural snowballs, 425 ; pocky cloud,

655.
Coffin, Professor J. H., winds of nor-

thern hemisphere, 456, 637.
Cold weather, January and March 1867,

280 ; Christmas 1860, 286; July 1867,
289; Southern Europe, January 1868,

497. See Temperature and Frosts,
Conduction of heat, 169.
Conservatory hygrometer, 321.

Convection of heat, 173.
Core, T. H., 26.
Coronas, 622 : as prognostics, 623 ; of

auroras, 605.
Crops, ripening, depends rot on mean

temperature, but on the highest tem-
perature during day, 160; in relation

to high and low temperatures, 166.
Currents of the sea, 233; how produced,

251; effect on climate, 361 et seq. :
currents of the atmosphere over the
globe, prevailing lower and upper,

481.
Cyclones. See Storms and Hurricanes.
DALIBARD, 579.
Dalmahoy's, James, theory for decrease

of rainfall with the height, 398.
Dalton's 'Meteorological Essays,' 12;

on height of aurora, 607.
Damp air, why it feels colder than dry

air, 171.
Daniell's Meteorological Essays,' 14;

hygrometer, 324.
Davy, H. Marie, on relation of storms

to magnetism, 611.
Density of the sea. See Sea.
Density of water, maximum, 206.
Dew, history of Theory of, 13; how de-

posited, and where most copiously,

202.
Dew-point of the air, 323; how ascer-

tained, 324, 330; important to horti-

culturists, as predicting frosts, 334.
Diathermancy of the air, 340.
Dové, isothermal lines, 16, 17, 87; ther-

mic isabnormals, 275; annual march
of temperature of the globe, 276; Law
of rotation of the wind, 483, 564; storms
formed by mutual interference of air-
currents, 573, 515.
Drainage as affecting temperature of

soil, 313.
Dry air of atmosphere, daily variation of

pressure of, 69; importance of know-

ledge of distribution of, 682 et seq.
Drying property, its importance as an

element of climate, 311.
Dry-and-wet-bulb hygrometer, 325; pre-

caution in using, 326.
East winds of Great Britain, 496; cause

of unhealthiness, 345; as a prognostic,

656, 657.
Education, importance of meteorology as

a branch of, 26.
Elastic force of vapour, 330; represents

the absolute humidity, 336.
Electrcity of the atmosphere, 579;

sources of, 585; in relation to its va-
pour, 586; annual and diurnal periods,
584 ; great changes during thunder-
storms, 588.
Electrometers, 580.
Electroscopes, 581.
Elliot's, Professor James, experiments

on drainage and temperature of soil,
315, 318.

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