Lectures on the Philosophy of the Human Mind, Volum 3

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John Grigg, 1824

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Side 144 - How small , of all that human hearts endure , That part which laws or kings can cause or cure.
Side 320 - Here love his golden shafts employs, here lights His constant lamp, and waves his purple wings, Reigns here and revels...
Side 386 - Why has not man a microscopic eye ? For this plain reason, man is not a fly.
Side 253 - IF you should see a flock of pigeons in a field of corn; and if (instead of each picking where and what it liked, taking just as much as it wanted, and no more) you should see ninety-nine of them gathering all they got into a heap; reserving nothing for themselves but the chaff and the refuse; keeping this heap for one, and that the weakest perhaps...
Side 375 - The impetuous song, and say from whom you rage. His praise, ye brooks, attune, ye trembling rills ; And let me catch it, as I muse along.
Side 349 - ... bitter potion to a distempered state. Times, and occasions, and provocations, will teach their own lessons. The wise will determine from the gravity of the case ; the irritable from sensibility to oppression; the high-minded from disdain and indignation at abusive power in unworthy hands ; the brave and bold from the love of honourable danger in a generous cause : but, with or without right, a revolution will be the very last resource of the thinking and the good. The third head of right, asserted...
Side 201 - the doing good to mankind, in obedience to the will of God, and for the sake of everlasting happiness.
Side 295 - THE MAN OF ROSS. ALL our praises why should lords engross ? Rise, honest Muse ! and sing the Man of Ross : Pleased Vaga echoes through her winding bounds, And rapid Severn hoarse applause resounds. Who hung with woods yon mountain's sultry brow ? From the dry rock who bade the waters flow ? Not to the skies in useless columns tost, Or in proud falls magnificently lost, But clear and artless, pouring through the plain Health to the sick, and solace to the swain. Whose causeway parts the vale with...
Side 383 - Annual for me, the grape, the rose renew The juice nectareous, and the balmy dew; For me, the mine a thousand treasures brings; For me, health gushes from a thousand springs; Seas roll to waft me, suns to light me rise; My foot-stool earth, my canopy the skies.
Side 80 - Just what you hear you have; and what's unknown The same, my lord, if Tully's or your own. All that we feel of it begins and ends In the small circle of our foes or friends; To all beside as much an empty shade...

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