The Poetical Works of George Crabbe

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H. Milford, Oxford University Press, 1914 - 600 sider
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Side 128 - Be brave then ; for your captain is brave, and vows reformation. There shall be, in England, seven halfpenny loaves sold for a penny : the threehooped pot shall have ten hoops ; and I will make it felony to drink small beer: all the realm shall be in common, and in Cheapside shall my palfrey go to grass.
Side vii - I loiter'd o'er thy green, Where humble happiness endeared each scene ; How often have I paused on every charm — The sheltered cot...
Side 34 - Which neither groves nor happy valleys boast; Where other cares than those the Muse relates, And other shepherds dwell with other mates; By such examples taught, I paint the Cot, As Truth will paint it, and as Bards will not...
Side 266 - But earthlier happy is the rose distill'd, Than that, which, withering on the virgin thorn, Grows, lives, and dies, in single blessedness.
Side 161 - There are a sort of men whose visages Do cream and mantle like a standing pond...
Side 292 - My conscience hath a thousand several tongues, And every tongue brings in a several tale, And every tale condemns me for a villain. Perjury, perjury, in the high'st degree; Murder, stern murder, in the dir'st degree; All several sins, all us'd in each degree, Throng to the bar, crying all 'Guilty! guilty!
Side x - I grant indeed that fields and flocks have charms For him that grazes or for him that farms; But when amid such pleasing scenes I trace The poor laborious natives of the place, And see the mid-day sun, with fervid ray, On their bare heads and dewy temples play; While some, with feebler heads and fainter hearts, Deplore their fortune, yet sustain their parts: Then shall I dare these real ills to hide In tinsel trappings of poetic pride?
Side 320 - And that which should accompany old age, As honour, love, obedience, troops of friends, I must not look to have ; but, in their stead, Curses, not loud but deep, mouth-honour, breath, Which the poor heart would fain deny, and dare not.
Side 64 - How fair these names, how much unlike they look To all the blurr'd subscriptions in my book: The bridegroom's letters stand in row above, Tapering yet...
Side 74 - Shame knew him not, he dreaded no disgrace ; Truth, simple truth, was written in his face.

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