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INSTRUCTORS AND STUDENTS IN COLLEGES AND SEMINARIES FOR WOMEN WHICH CONFER

DEGREES (1905-1906).

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North Atlantic Division

Massachusetts..
New York

Pennsylvania..
South Atlantic Division
Maryland..
District of Columbia..
Virginia ....
West Virginia..
North Carolina..
South Carolina
Georgia..
South Central Division-

Kentucky
Tennessee.
Alabama...
Mississippi
Louisiana..
Texas..

Arkansas.
North Central Division-

Ohio.....
Illinois..
Wisconsin..
Missouri.

Kansas
Western Division--California.
North Atlantic Division..
South Atlantic Division..
South Central Division..
North Central Division
Western Division....

United States...

22 18 24 18 11 11 1

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583 598

466 1.058

297 313 75

797 982

953 1,418 293 374 55

95 $1,006,240 12

676,974 79 276,340 70 156, 151

25,371 8 213,555 2 16,000 11 131,890 10 129,662 11 227,714

8 97.700 15 137,000 23 91.900 30 228,910

94,742 67,224

10,000 3 72,541

96,345

108,118 5 158.749

12,850

39,200 186 1,939,554 112

903,373 76 727,476 8 448,603

39,200 382 4.078,206

3

6 8 2 46 1

5 308 214 105 63 5

10 1 2 19 45 45 18

2 129

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675 505 302

58 2,164

695

PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT'S MISSISSIPPI RIVER TRIP.

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President Roosevelt left Washington Sept. 29, 1907, and after assisting at the dedication of the McKinley mausoleum at Canton, O., on the 30th proceeded to Keokuk, Iowa, where he was met Oct. 1 by the governors of ten states. At Rand park in that city he spoke to 10,000 persons on the relations of the government to corporations engaged in interstate commerce. Referring to the charge that his policy was leading to a financial panic, he said:

"I do not admit that this has been the main cause of any business troubles we have had; but it is possible that it has been a contributory cause. If so, friends, as far as I am coneerned it must be accepted as a disagreeable but unavoidable feature in a course of policy which, as long as I am president, will not be changed. In any great movement for righteousness where the forces of evil are strongly intrenched it is unfortunately inevitable that some unoffending people should suffer in company with the real offenders. This is not our fault. It is the fault of those to whose deceptive action these innocent people owe their false position."

From Keokuk the president proceeded by steamer down the Mississippi to St. Louis, Cairo and Memphis, at each of which places he made addresses. At St. Louis on the 2d he touched on the matter of centralization as follows:

"I ask that the national powers already conferred upon the national government by the con

President Roosevelt's speech at Cairo on the 3d was largely devoted to the necessity of having a strong navy, and that at Memphis on the 4th, delivered before the delegates to the deep-waterway convention, consisted mainly of arguments for the improvement of the navigable streams of the country. He referred again to the complaints that his policy of prosecuting trusts violating the law was hurting business. He said the losses of innocent investors might be likened to those of perscns who had innocently accepted counterfeit mon ey for services rendered. The government could not permit them to pass the counterfeit bills. "Just the same thing is true when it comes to enforcing the law against business men of great wealth who have violated it. People are always beseeching me not to enforce it against them be. cause innocent outsiders may be hurt, or only to enforce it with a gentleness that would prevent anybody, good or bad, from being hurt. It is not possible to comply with such requests."

Leaving Memphis the president proceeded south to a place near the Tensas river in Louisiana. where he spent some time in hunting.

SUIT AGAINST MRS. MARY BAKER G. EDDY.

In the summer of 1907 a suit' in equity was brought by relatives of Mrs. Mary Baker G. Eddy, head of the Christian science church, for an accounting of her property on the ground that through age and infirmities she was unable to manage her affairs and that she had become the victim of persons associated with her in religious

work. A board of masters was appointed by the Superior court at Concord, N. H., to take testimony as to her competency and the hearings last. ed several weeks. The proceedings came to an end Aug. 21 when the relatives, through their chief counsel, William E. Chandler, had the suit dismissed.

STATISTICS OF CRIME IN THE UNITED STATES.

[From special reports by census bureau.] June 30, 1904, there were in the United States estimated population. Distributed by sex, color, 1,337 prisons of all kinds receiving persons sen- nativity and race they were as follows for the tenced for crime. The total number of inmates main geographical divisions: on the same date was 81,772, or 100.6 per 100,000 of

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6

North Atlantic-Males...

24,882 22,193 15,170 6,994 29 2,689 2,661 15 13 Females..

2,507 2,156 1,193 960

3 351 319

2 Total.

27,389 24,349 16,363 7,934 32 3,040 3,010 15 15 South Atlantic-Males.

10.535
2,758
2,387 163 208 7.777 7,767

1

9 Females...

615 101 86 10

5 514 514 Total... 11,150 2,859 2,473 173 213 8,291 8,281 1

9 North Central-Males.. 20,361 16,295 13,562 2,556 177 4,066 3.832

3 231 Females...

639 398 309 89

241 236

5 Total...

21,000 16,693 13,871 2,645 177 4,307 4,068 3 236 South Central--Males.

14,055 4,297 3,839 453

5 9,758

9,752 Females..

559 42 41

1

517 517 Total... 14,614 4,339 3,880 454 5 10,275 10,269

6 Western-Males.

7,436 6,737 5,046 1,682 9 699 414 170 115 Females.

183 134 97 37

49 45

1

3 Total....

7,619 6,871 5,143 1,719

748
459 171

118 Continental United States- Males.

77,269 52,280 40,004 11.848 428 24,989 24,426 189 374 Females...

4,503 2,831 1,726 1,097

8 1,572 1,661

1 10 Total...

81,772 55,111 41.730 12, 45 436 26.661 26,087 190 384

PRISONERS BY STATES. AND TERRITORIES.
State or territory.
No. Per 100,000 pop1 State or territory.

No. Per 100.000 pop. Maine

496
70.0. New Mexico..

265 126.4 New Hampshire.

416
97.7 Arizona

318 232.0 Vermont

274
78.7 Utah

223 73.4 Massachusetts 5,684 187.2 Nevada

129

304.7 Rhode Island..

604 130.6
Idaho

196 102.3 Connecticut

1,125

115.4
Washington

911

156.0 New York..

9,862 126.7
Oregon

399

88.1 New Jersey 2,720 131.9 California

3,355 210.2 Pennsylvania

6,208

92.3
Western division...

7,619 169.4 North Atlantic division..

.27,389

121.6
Continental United States.

.81,772 100.6 Delaware

160
83.6

CLASSIFICATION OF CRIMES.
Maryland

1,867 149.7

Against society. District of Columbia.

.17,733 46

15.4

Against the person. Virginia 1,895

26,017 97.9

Against property. West Virginia..

37,166 1,139 109.6 Double crimes..

126 North Carolina.

1,185

59.1
Unclassified

127 South Carolina.

1.045

73.7

Offense not stated.. Georgia

597 2,579

108.3 Florida

CONVICTED OF HOMICIDE.
1,234 211.1
Maine

44

6.2 New Hampshire..

23

5.4 South Atlantic division..

11, 150 100.5
Vermont

15

4.3 Ohio 3,363 77.2 Massachusetts

120

4.0 Indiana 2,138 80.7 Rhode Island..

24

5.2 Illinois 3,180 60.8 Connecticut

74

7.6 Michigan

1,995
78.8 New York...

472

6.1 Wisconsin

1,366

61.5
New Jersey.

121

5.9 Minnesota

1,067
55.2 Pennsylvania

374

5.6 Iowa

1,255

53.1 Missouri

2,793
85.1 North Atlantic division

1,267

5.6 North Dakota.

203 54.6
Delaware

16
Scuth Dakota
245

9.4 57.9 Maryland

124 Nebraska

9.9 519

48.5
Virginia

261 Kansas

13.5 2,876 193.3 West Virginia..

263

25.3 North Carolina..

263 North central division.

13.1 21,000 75.2 South Carolina.

340

24.0 Kentucky 2,221 98.1 Georgia

793

33.4 Tennessee

1,997
94.0 Florida

304

52.0 Alabama

2,068 105 6 Mississippi

1,238

74.7
South Atlantic division.

2,364 21.3 Louisiana

1.680 112.3 Texas

Ohio 4,504

300 133.2

6.9 Oklahoma

Indiana
22
4.2

178

6.7 Arkansas

Illinois 884

463 63 8

8.9 Michigan

173

6.8 South central division.

Wisconsin

137 .14,614 95.7

6.2 Minnesota

101 Montana

5.2 571 200.8 Iowa

116

4.9 Wyoming 230 219.5 Missouri

333

10 1 Colorado 1,022 172.8 North Dakota..

33

9.9 ISLE OF PINES DECISION.

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FOREIGN-BORN PRISONERS.
Country.
Pct. Country.

Pct. Austria 2.9 Mexico

1.4 Canada ...19.1 Norway

1.4 Denmark 0.6 Poland

3.9 England and Wales. 9.2 Russia

3.5 France 1.0 Scotland

3.5 Germany .12.3 Sweden

2.9 Hungary .. 1.2 Switzerland

0.5 Ireland

.36.2 Other countries...... 4.2 Italy

6.1 AGES OF PRISONERS COMMITTED IN 1904.

Total. Male. Female 10 to 14 years.

695 642 53 15 to 19 years.

13,886 12,909 977 20 to 24 years.

26,983 24,647 2,336 25 to 29 years.

23,278 21,153 2,125 30 to 34 years..

19,173 17,245 1,928 35 to 39 years.

17,460 15,683 1,777 40 to 44 years.

14,260 12,850 1,410 45 to 49 years..

10,415 9,471 944 50 to 59 years.

12,306 11,335 971 60 to 69 years..

5,069 4,614 455 70 years and over..

1,072 943 - 129

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.. 2.1

Western division..

1,048 23.3 Continental United States............10,774 13.3

PRISONERS ACCORDING TO SENTENCE.
Death

133
4 years..

2,879 Imprisonment-Life 5,026 3 years.

5,457 Indeterminate ...12,352 242 years..

902 21 years and over 1,591 2 years..

6,313 20 years.... 1,405 142 years..

1,294 15 to 19 years.. 2,152 1 year............. 5,253 10 to 14-years.... 5,192 9 years.

374 At least 1 year.43,679 8 years.

1,190 Under 1 year.....20,033 7 years..

1,777 Period not stated 499 6 years.

1,464 All sentences.....81,772 5 years.... ....... 6,446

PRISONERS COMMITTED IN 1904. During 1904 a total of 149,691 prisoners were committed in the United States on term sentences, Assuming that those enumerated on June 30, 1904 namely, 81,772—represent the average number in prisons on any given date, it will be seen that the prison population on a fixed date constitutes about 54.6 per cent of the number committed on term sentences during a year.

of the prisoners committed in 1904 244 were for homicide, 1,484 for robbery. and 7,161 for burglary. The distribution by color, sex, race and nativity was as follows:

Total. Male. Female White-Native

86,833 80,967 5,856 Native parentage

51,930 48,565 3.365 Foreign parentage.

24,448 22,631 1,817 Mixed parentage..

5,667 5,212 455 Parentage unknown..

4,788 4,559 229 Foreign born..

35,093 30,613 4,480 Nativity unknown..

3,167 3,090 77

All known ages....

.144,597 131,492 13,105 MARITAL CONDITION. Of the prisoners committed in 1904 63.9 per cent were single, 26.1 married, 4.1 widowed, 0.5 divorced and 5.3 unknown. Of the male prisoners 66.3 per cent were single and 24.2 per cent married, while of the female prisoners 39.1 per cent were single and 46.2 per cent married.

OCCUPATION. Occupations.

Pct. Professional

0.9 Clerical and official.. Mercantile and trading.

26 Public entertainment.

0.7 Personal service, police and military

1.8 Laboring and servant..

...50.1 Manufacturing and mechanical industry. ..23.7 Agriculture, transportation and other outdoor...17.2 All other occupations...

0.9 JUVENILE DELINQUENTS ENUMERATED

JUNE 30, 1904.

Total. Male. Female White-Native

17,989

14,130 3,859 Foreign born..

1,874 1,562 312 Nativity unknown..

9
3

6

Total white.

19,872 15,695 4,177 Colored-Negro

3,112 2,433 679 Mongolian

2

2 Indian

48
47

1 Total colored...

3,162 2,482 680 Aggregate

23,034 18,177 4,857. JUVENILE DELINQUENTS COMMITTED DUR

ING 1904.

Total. Male. Female White-Native .....

9,061
7,776

1,285 Native parentage.

4,440 3,812 628 Foreign parentage.

2,947 2,659 288 Mixed parentage..

1,145 969 176 Parentage unknown.

529 336 193 Foreign born......

1,116 1,020 96 Nativity unknown...

61

39 22 Total white..

10,238 8,835 1,403 Colored-Negro

1,550 1,294 256 Mongolian

2

2 Indian

24
23

1

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It was decided by the United States Supreme court April 8, 1907, that the Isle of Pines is and always has been an integral part of Cuba so far as government relations are concerned; that it is foreign territory, that it does not belong to the

United States and that duties are properly levied on goods coming from it to the United States. The decision of the court was unanimous. Many of the inhabitants of the Isle of Pines are Americans.

UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE.

Fiscal year ended June 30, 1907.
RECEIPTS (1907).

Transportation-pneumatic-tube service $433,934.13 Stamps, envelopes, wrappers, cards...$165, 742,093.88

Canceling machines.

242,979.38 Second-class postage paid in money... 7,127,752.78

Miscellaneous items at first and second Box rents.. 3,556,801.00 class postoffices.

237,325.55 Money-order business.

3,522,978.27

Payment of money orders more than Third and fourth class postage paid

one year old.

228,201.86 in money.. 2,738,061 38 Wrapping twine..

198,946.22 Letter postage paid in money.

135,343.56 Registered package, tag, official and Fines and openalties...

410,687.61
dead-letter envelopes...

191,158.76 Miscellaneous receipts.

108,493.95 Blanks, etc., for money-order service. 173, 132.51 From unclaimed dead letters. 26,056 62 Manufacture of postal cards...

164,900.32 Unpaid money orders....

216,736.02
Balances due foreign countries..

135,055.31

Freight and expressage on supplies... 118,640.82 Total receipts...

183,585,005.57
Stationery

84,846.02 NOTE—The first item of postal revenue above

Supplies, city-delivery service.

59,658.80 Emergencies in California.

56,245.32 enumerated (sales of stamps, etc.) includes the

Transportation, special facilities..

53.965.54 amount of special-delivery stamps sold, as well as

Facing slips, etc....

48,113.28 stamps sold for the payment of registry fees.

Mail locks and keys..

42.833.75 The amount of stamps sold during the year for use in the payment of registry fees will doubtless ap

Postmarking. rating and money-order
stamps

34,664.93 proximate the amount used during the year for

Assistant superintendents.

30,385.80 such fees, viz., $2,722,446.32. The estimated amount

Typewriters, copying presses, etc...... 22,382.93 of special-delivery stamps sold, based upon the amount of the fees paid for the delivery of special

Expenditures under twenty smaller

items of appropriation (less than $20,delivery mail during the year, is $1,289,631.92.

000 each)....

96,507.52 EXPENDITURES (1907). Transportation of mails on railroads.. $43,896,928.32

Total expenditures.

189,935, 242.79 Compensation to assistant postmasters

Net deficit for 1907..

31.47 and clerks in postoffices..

26,638.999.80

RECEIPTS. Rural delivery.. 26,653,304.36

1906.

1907. Compensation to postmasters.

24,575,696.10

Ordinary postal reve-
City delivery..

23, 248,535.90
nue

$164,913,960.33 $179,845,291.28 Railway-mail service.

15,175,587.76

Receipts Transportation on star routes.

7,456, 453.14

money - order business

3.018,822.62 3,739, 714.29 Railway postoffice-car service.

5,761,032.48 Rent, light and fuel..

2.898,021.78

Total receipts, all
Transportation of foreign mails..

2,853, 794.12
sources

167,932,782.95 183,585,005.57 Mail-messenger service..

1,333,345.78 Transportation-wagon service.

1,212,634.26

EXPENDITURES. Postoffice inspectors..

1,072,385.79 Expenditures account of Manufacture of stamped envelopes.. 1,041,068.80

year

-$178,270,103.02 $189,935,242.79 Special-delivery service...

1,040,771.41 Expenditures account Transportation on steamboats.

784,312.38 previous years...

179,675.87 303,045.55 Transportation-electric and cable cars 726.624.35 Manufacture of postage stamps..

465,585.36 Total expenditures.. 178,449,778.89 190,238,288.34 Mail bags, cord fasteners, label cases,

Excess of expendietc.

446,280.59
tures

10,516,995.94 6,653,282.77 POSTMASTERS OF LARGE CITIES (1907). Albany, N. Y.-C. M. Argensinger.

Minneapolis. Minn.-W. D. Hale. Allegheny, Pa.-William J. Kopp.

Nashville, Tenn.-A. W. Wills. Baltimore, Md.-W. Hall Harris.

Newark, N. J.-James L. Hayes. Boston, Mass.-George A. Hibbard.

New Haven, Conn.-J. W. Howarth. Buffalo, N. Y.-Fred Greiner.

New Orleans, La.-T. J. Woodward. Camden, N. J.-Robert Barber.

New York, N. Y.-Edward M. Morgan. Charleston, S. C.-W. L. Harris.

Omaha, Neb.-H. E. Palmer. Chicago, Ill.-Daniel A. Campbell.

Paterson, N. J.-George W. Pollitt. Cincinnati, 0.-E. R. Monfort,

Peoria, Ill.-Henry W. Lynch. Cleveland, 0.-C. C. Dewstoe.

Philadelphia, Pa.-Richard L. Ashhurst. Columbus, 0.-H. W. Krumm.

Pittsburg. Pa.-William H. Davis. Dayton, 0.-F. B. G. Withoft.

Portland, Me.-Fred H, King. Denver, Col.-Paul J. Sours.

Portland, Ore.- John W. Minto. Des Moines, Iowa-Joseph I. Myerly.

Providence, R. I.–Clinton D. Sellew. Detroit, Mich.-Homer Warren.

Reading. Pa.-A. M. High. Duluth, Minn.-Guy A. Eaton.

Richmond, Va.-Roy E. Cabell. Fall River, Mass.-George T. Durfee.

Rochester, N.Y.-W. S. Whittlesey. Fort Wayne, Ind.-Robert B. Hanna.

St. Joseph, Mo.-A. W. Brewster. Galveston, Tex.-Harry A. Griffin.

St. Louis, Mo.-Frank Wyman. Grand Rapids, Mich.-Loomis K. Bishop.

Salt Lake City, Utah-A. L. Thomas. Hartford, Conn.-Frank A. Hagarty.

San Antonio, Tex.-John J. Stevens, Indianapolis, Ind.-H. W. Bennett.

San Francisco, Cal.-A. G. Fisk. Jersey City, N. J.-Peter F. Wanser.

Seattle. Wash.-George M. Stewart. Kansas City, Mo.- Joseph H. Harris.

Springfield, Ill.-L. E. Wheeler. Lincoln, Neb.-E. R. Sizer.

Springfield, Mass.-Louis C. Hyde. Los Angeles, Cal.-M. H. Flint.

Toledo, 0.-W. H. Tucker. Louisville. Ky.-Robert E. Woods.

Trenton, N. J.-A. E. Yard. Lowell, Mass.-A. G. Thompson.

Troy, N. Y.-A. E. Bonesteel. Memphis, Tenn.-L. W. Dutro.

Washington, D. C.-B. F. Barnes.
Milwaukee, Wis.-David Owen.

Wilmington, Del.-Henry C. Conrad.
HUNTING AND FOOTBALL ACCIDENTS IN 1907.
Killed. Injured.

Killed. Injured. Hunting

81 Football

..11

98

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..71

.1900

CENSUS BUREAU STATISTICS OF AMERICAN CITIES IN 1905. City. *Incorporation. #Land area. #Parks. City.

*Incorporation. Land area. ÎParks. New York, N. Y.. . 1901 209, 218.1 6,979.7 Providence, R. I..

.1832 11,355.1 583.8 Chicago, Ill... .1875 117,447.0 3,391.0 St. Paul, Minn..

.. 1854 33.388.0 1.323 4 Philadelphia, Pa. .1854 81,828.0 3,959.4 Rochester, N. Y..

...1834

11.993.0 871.1 St. Louis, Mo.

.1876 39,276.3 2,198.4 Kansas City, Mo. ..1889 16.743.0 713.0 Boston, Mass .1854 24,613.0 2,284.6 Toledo, 0.

1836 16,450.0 510.0 Baltimore, Md. ..1898 19, 290.2 1,500.0 Denver, Col..

..1904

37.348.0 603.0 Cleveland, O.. ..1836 26,104.0 1,223.9 Allegheny, Pa...

..1840 4,726.0 400.0 Buffalo, N. Y. ..1832 26,496.0 906.0 Columbus, O...

..1834 10,176.0 1958 San Francisco, Cal. 29,760.0 1,235.0 Worcester, Mass.

.1894 23,683.0 866.2 Pittsburg. Pa.. .1901 18,826.0 1,010.5 Los Angeles, Cal.

1889 27,399.1

738.: Cincinnati, 0. 1819 27,182.9 435.8 Memphis, Tenn.

.1879 9,771.9 165.4 Detroit, Mich...

1883
22,976.0 1,054.7 Omaha, Neb..

1897

15,380.0 397.: Milwaukee, Wis. .1874 14.003.0 521.8 New Haven, Conn.

..1784 11,460.0 960.2 New Orleans, La. 1896 125, 600.0 1,217.9 Syracuse, N. Y.

...1847 10,189.0 278.7 Washington, D. C. .1878 38,406.4 Scranton. Pa..

1866 12,186.1

97.2 Newark, N. J. .1836 10,679.0 19.2 St. Joseph, Mo.

1885 6,080.0

27.3 Minneapolis, Minn. 1881 31,621.6 1,810.6 Paterson, N. J...

..1871 5, 157.0

91. Jersey City, N. J.. .1871 8.320.0 30 1 Fall River, Mass.

...1903 21,722.0

97.7 Louisville, Ky.. ..1893 13,093.5 468.6 Portland, Ore....

.1903 23,836.0 248.3 Indianapolis, Ind.. 1905 19,165.0 1,300.0 Atlanta, Ga...

1874 7,680.0 334.0 *Latest. +In acres. #Area in acres.

TOTAL PAYMENTS AND RECEIPTS.
City.
Payments. Receipts. City.

Payments. Receipts. New York, N. Y. $377,079,712 $373,965,651 Providence, R. I...

$8,816,769 $8,916,368 Chicago, Ill.. 62,889,561 61,595, 240 St. Paul, Minn..

5.321,587 5,380,369 Philadelphia, Pa. 45,604,707 41,778, 239 Rochester, N. Y.

8,925,842

8,560, 879 St. Louis, Mo.. 22,670,935 22,715,390 Kansas City, Mo.

8,593,014 8,159.163 Boston, Mass. 54, 719, 405 55,593,860 Toledo, 0...

4,765, 765

5,235.262 Baltimore, Md. 16,319, 410 16,546,130 Denver, Col..

8,462,951 9,097,642 Cleveland, O.. 16,649,144 16,947,505 Allegheny, Pa...

4,476,570 4,717,376 Buffalo, N. Y.. 19,040,249 20,682,049 Columbus, O.

9,012,390 9.316,144 San Francisco, Cal.. 13,526, 803 12, 183,773 Worcester, Mass..

9,264,333 9,125,558 Pittsburg. Pa.. 15.641,857 15,768,661 Los Angeles, Cal.

6.840, 661 8.718.006 Cincinnati, 0. 15,539,414 15,581,555 Memphis, Tenn..

2,661,647 2, 743,241 Detroit, Mich. 8,341,470 8,491,144 Omaha, Neb.

3,091, 102

3,025, 479 Milwaukee, Wis.. 9,156,793 9,258,834 New Haven, Conn.

3,653,544 3,700,219 New Orleans, La. 9.996,529 10,135,950 Syracuse, N. Y..

5.093,117 5,088,247 Washington, D. C. 15,475,826 15,498.792 Scranton, Pa...

1,895,493 1,961,585 Newark, N. J.. 23,859,418 23, 635,100 St. Joseph, Mo..

1,629,000

1.380, 434 Minneapolis, Minn. 5,729,939 5,747,851 Paterson, N. J.

4,601,483 4,576,618 Jersey City, N. J.. 8,703,375 8.901,502 Fall River, Mass.

4,487,072 4.335,012 Louisville, Ky. 6,858,299 7,034.42C Portland, Ore..

3,267.888 3,497.589 Indianapolis, Ind.. 4,118,206 4,006,290 Atlanta, Ga....

2,048,093 2,074,974 PAYMENTS FOR SPECIFIED PURPOSES.

RecreaCity.

Government. Protection.* Health. HighwaysCharities&correction Education. tion.t New York, N. Y.

$9,435,662 $23,120,061 $8.953,120 $6,757,480 $7,114,663 $22,613,911 $2,420,377 Chicago, Ill...

2,003,231 6,425,568 1,999,400 1,157,398 346.136 7,593,302 1,555, 452 Philadelphia, Pa..

2,519,082 5,243,831 2,036,444 2,662,056 1,448, 291 5,213,215 951.179 St. Louis, Mo..

1,163,883 2,768,574 1,298,230 1,358,479 774,351 2,169,164 207.642 Boston, Mass.

2,274,854 3,544,716 1,857.989 2,028,769 1,768, 705 3,983,141 727.546 Baltimore, Md.

777,629 1,765,633 621,088 701,279 517,318 1,608,386 215,443 Cleveland, 0....

325, 815 1,309,389 486,153 794,207 284,838 2,045, 413 210,124 Buffalo, N. Y..

364.357 1.626.902 468,701 751,648 139,765 1,496,086 164,210 San Francisco, Cal.

878,966 2,242.918 349,650 479,168 477,204 1,550,917 396.75 Pittsburg, Pa..

300,525 1,331,937 578,306 596,073 136,439 1,622,622 173,241 Cincinnati, O..

304,161 1,194,221 418,929 620,366 410,494 1, 136, 846 61,046 Detroit, Mich.

329, 441 1,338,265 344,871 456, 470 136,991 1,181,490 184.362 Milwaukee, Wis..

226,726 935,419 556,171 575,087 19,808 1,114,722 95,706 New Orleans, La..

368,048 793,085 428,920 380,606 100, 298 626,413 42,997 Washington, D. C..

463,082 1,585,219 504,087 798,113 839,304 1.607,471 331,024 Newark, N. J....

288,589 964,389 369,941 350,677 230, 608 1,357,076 39,356 Minneapolis, Minn.

157,772 649, 713 203,213 617,462 105,574 11,065,441 106,099 Jersey City, N. J..

223, 114 723,792 123,364 278,342 51,744 679,339 28,224 Louisville, Ky.

161,320 648, 692 188,816 301,215 184,927 609,251 79,969 Indianapolis, Ind.

94,326 583,510 142,049 361,210 60,671 789,372 71.148 Providence, R. I.

192,597 840,052 268,884 592,480 122,993 855, 205 63.086 St. Paul, Minn..

89,938 454,862 165, 169 431,223 67,967 698,314 120.081 Rochester, N. Y

229,269 635,996 302,004 424,638 146,539 611.741 80,934 Kansas City, Mo.

248,176 621,256 158,335 358,364 59,378 922, 612 135.699 Toledo, O...

126,590 344 859 118,757 234,812 35,929 499, 705 37.932 Denver, Col..

578,112 466,939 192,328 376,312 206,393 886,262 132,016 Allegheny, Pa.

96,710 359, 220

174,026 269,073 88,027 566,371 69.321 Columbus, 0.

115.558 366,901 106,588 111,534 31.632 523,053 10.376 Worcester, Mass.

98,804 374,784 197,301 299,989 204,240 657,339 26.995 Los Angeles, Cal..

220,169 564,139 180,853 593,252 17,176 923,573 107,620 Memphis, Tenn..

41,116 332,757 164,332 186,310 40,896 230,804 47,678 Omaha, Neb. 138,271 270,333 71.785 192,395

495, 402 30,551 New Haven, Conn.

133,995 387, 440 89,400 182,883 96,809 463,189 30.153 Syracuse, N. Y.

197,153 361.962 183,645 202,882 118,378 501,005 30, S83 Scranton, Pa....

71,976 180.825 42,304 121,892 93, 108 450.052 9.632 St. Joseph, Mo.

48,506 184,450

31.737

75,831 13,501 241, 236 15 018 Paterson. N. J.

79,776 343, 173 87.505 121,690 59,394 399,092 22,226 Fall River. Mass.

77,443 291.050

79,961 195.923 145,880 390,835 11,000 Portland, Ore... 76,287 349,28: 105,971 182,790

1,884 433,129 23.134 Atlanta, Ga.

86,320 334,303 164.915 224,585 71,441 231,818 28.797 *of life and property-police and fire departments. #Parks, gardens, playgrounds, bathing beaches.

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