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INSTRUCTORS AND STUDENTS IN COLLEGES AND SEMINARIES FOR WOMEN WHICH CONFER DEGREES (1905-1906).

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President Roosevelt left Washington Sept. 29, 1907, and after assisting at the dedication of the McKinley mausoleum at Canton, O., on the 30th proceeded to Keokuk, Iowa, where he was met Oct. 1 by the governors of ten states. At Rand park in that city he spoke to 10,000 persons on the relations of the government to corporations engaged in interstate commerce. Referring to the charge that his policy was leading to a financial panic, he said:

"I do not admit that this has been the main cause of any business troubles we have had; but it is possible that it has been a contributory cause. If so, friends, as far as I am coneerned it must be accepted as a disagreeable but unavoidable feature in a course of policy which, as long as I am president, will not be changed. In any great movement for righteousness where the forces of evil are strongly intrenched it is unfortunately inevitable that some unoffending people should suffer in company with the real offenders. This is not our fault. It is the fault of those to whose deceptive action these innocent people owe their false position."

From Keokuk the president proceeded by steamer down the Mississippi to St. Louis, Cairo and Memphis, at each of which places he made addresses. At St. Louis on the 2d he touched on the matter of centralization as follows:

"I ask that the national powers already conferred upon the national government by the con

MISSISSIPPI RIVER TRIP.

stitution shall be so used as to bring national commerce and industry effectively under the federal government and thereby avert industrial chaos. My plea is not to bring about centralization. is that the government shall recognize a condition of centralization in a field where it already exists."

It

President Roosevelt's speech at Cairo on the 3d was largely devoted to the necessity of having a strong navy, and that at Memphis on the 4th, delivered before the delegates to the deep-waterway convention, consisted mainly of arguments for the improvement of the navigable streams of the country. He referred again to the complaints that his policy of prosecuting trusts violating the law was hurting business. He said the losses of innocent investors might be likened to those of perscns who had innocently accepted counterfeit money for services rendered. The government could not permit them to pass the counterfeit bills. "Just the same thing is true when it comes to enforcing the law against business men of great wealth who have violated it. People are always beseeching me not to enforce it against them because innocent outsiders may be hurt, or only to enforce it with a gentleness that would prevent anybody, good or bad, from being hurt. It is not possible to comply with such requests."

Leaving Memphis the president proceeded south to a place near the Tensas river in Louisiana. where he spent some time in hunting.

SUIT AGAINST MRS. MARY BAKER G. EDDY.

In the summer of 1907 a suit in equity was brought by relatives of Mrs. Mary Baker G. Eddy. head of the Christian science church, for an accounting of her property on the ground that through age and infirmities she was unable to manage her affairs and that she had become the victim of persons associated with her in religious

work. A board of masters was appointed by the Superior court at Concord, N. H., to take testimony as to her competency and the hearings lasted several weeks. The proceedings came to an end Aug. 21 when the relatives, through their chief counsel, William E. Chandler, had the suit dismissed.

STATISTICS OF CRIME IN THE UNITED STATES.
[From special reports by census bureau.]

June 30, 1904, there were in the United States 1,337 prisons of all kinds receiving persons sentenced for crime. The total number of inmates on the same date was 81,772, or 100.6 per 100,000 of

estimated population. Distributed by sex, color, nativity and race they were as follows for the main geographical divisions:

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Total.

Male. Female

86,833

Native parentage

5 years............ 6,446

At least 1 year.43,679 Under 1 year.....20,033 Period not stated 499 All sentences.....81,772

PRISONERS COMMITTED IN 1904.

During 1904 a total of 149,691 prisoners were committed in the United States on term sentences. Assuming that those enumerated on June 30, 1904 namely, 81,772-represent the average number in prisons on any given date, it will be seen that the prison population on a fixed date constitutes about 54.6 per cent of the number committed on term sentences during a year.

Of the prisoners committed in 1904 244 were for homicide, 1,484 for robbery'. and 7,161 for burglary. The distribution by color, sex, race and nativity was as follows:

White-Native

80,967 5,866

51,930 48,565 3,365

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Mercantile and trading.

26

Public entertainment.

0.7

Personal service, police and military.

1.8

Laboring and servant....

...50.1

Manufacturing and mechanical industry.

...23.7

0.9

JUVENILE DELINQUENTS ENUMERATED JUNE 30, 1904.

Total.

White-Native Foreign born.. Nativity unknown..

17,989

Male. Female 14,130

1,874

3,859 1,562 312

9

3

6

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7,127,752.78 3,556,801.00

3,522,978.27

2,738,061 88

135,343.56

410,687.61

108,493.95

26,056.62

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Stamps, envelopes, wrappers, cards...$165,742,093.88 Second-class postage paid in money...

Box rents..

Money-order business..

Third and fourth class postage paid

in money..

Letter postage paid in money.

Fines and penalties...

Miscellaneous receipts.

From unclaimed dead letters.. Unpaid money orders...

Total receipts...

216,736.02 183,585,005.57

NOTE-The first item of postal revenue above enumerated (sales of stamps, etc.) includes the amount of special-delivery stamps sold, as well as stamps sold for the payment of registry fees. The amount of stamps sold during the year for use in the payment of registry fees will doubtless approximate the amount used during the year for such fees, viz., $2.722,446.32. The estimated amount of special-delivery stamps sold, based upon the amount of the fees paid for the delivery of specialdelivery mail during the year, is $1,289,631.92.

EXPENDITURES (1907).

Transportation of mails on railroads.. $43,896,928.32 Compensation to assistant postmasters

and clerks in postoffices...

Compensation to postmasters...

Transportation-pneumatic-tube service $433,934.13 Canceling machines..

Net deficit for 1907.....

242,979.38

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Total expenditures..

189,935,242.79

6,692,031.47

RECEIPTS.

City delivery......

Ordinary postal reve

23,248,535.90

Railway-mail service..

nue

15,175,587.76

1906. 1907. $164,913,960.33 $179,845,291.28

Transportation on star routes..

7,456,453.14

Receipts business

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money order

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3,018,822.62 3,739,714.29

Manufacture of stamped envelopes..

1,041,068.80

year

.$178,270,103.02 $189,935,242.79

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Expenditures account previous years..

179,675.87

726,624.35

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303,045.55 190,238,288.34

10,516,995.94

6,653,282.77

Transportation-electric and cable cars Manufacture of postage stamps.

Mail bags, cord fasteners, label cases, etc.

POSTMASTERS OF LARGE CITIES (1907).

Albany, N. Y.-C. M. Argensinger. Allegheny, Pa.-William J. Kopp. Baltimore, Md.-W. Hall Harris. Boston, Mass.-George A. Hibbard. Buffalo, N. Y.-Fred Greiner. Camden, N. J.-Robert Barber. Charleston, S. C.-W. L. Harris.

Chicago, Ill.-Daniel A. Campbell.

Cincinnati, O.-E. R. Monfort.

Cleveland, O.-C. C. Dewstoe.

Columbus, O.-H. W. Krumm.

Dayton, O.-F. B. G. Withoft.

Denver, Col.-Paul J. Sours.

Des Moines, Iowa-Joseph I. Myerly.
Detroit, Mich.-Homer Warren.
Duluth, Minn.-Guy A. Eaton.

Fall River, Mass.-George T. Durfee.
Fort Wayne, Ind.-Robert B. Hanna.
Galveston, Tex.-Harry A. Griffin.

Grand Rapids, Mich.-Loomis K. Bishop.
Hartford, Conn.-Frank A. Hagarty.
Indianapolis, Ind.-H. W. Bennett.
Jersey City, N. J.-Peter F. Wanser.
Kansas City, Mo.-Joseph H. Harris.
Lincoln, Neb.-E. R. Sizer.

Los Angeles, Cal.-M. H. Flint.
Louisville. Ky.-Robert E. Woods.
Lowell, Mass.-A. G. Thompson.
Memphis, Tenn.-L. W. Dutro.
Milwaukee, Wis.-David Owen.

Hunting

Minneapolis, Minn.-W. D. Hale.
Nashville, Tenn.-A. W. Wills.
Newark, N. J.-James L. Hayes.
New Haven, Conn.-J. W. Howarth.
New Orleans, La.-T. J. Woodward.
New York, N. Y.-Edward M. Morgan.
Omaha, Neb.-H. E. Palmer.
Paterson, N. J.-George W. Pollitt.
Peoria, Ill.-Henry W. Lynch.

Philadelphia, Pa.-Richard L. Ashhurst.

Pittsburg, Pa.-William H. Davis.

Portland, Me.-Fred H. King.

Portland, Ore.-John W. Minto.

Providence, R. I.-Clinton D. Sellew.

Reading. Pa.-A. M. High.

Richmond, Va.-Roy E. Cabell.
Rochester, N. Y.-W. S. Whittlesey.
St. Joseph, Mo.-A. W. Brewster.
St. Louis, Mo.-Frank Wyman.
Salt Lake City, Utah-A. L. Thomas.
San Antonio, Tex.-John J. Stevens,
San Francisco, Cal.-A. G. Fisk.
Seattle, Wash.-George M. Stewart.
Springfield, Ill.-L. E. Wheeler.
Springfield, Mass.-Louis C. Hyde.
Toledo, O.-W. H. Tucker.
Trenton, N. J.-A. E. Yard.
Troy, N. Y.-A. E. Bonesteel.
Washington, D. C.-B. F. Barnes.
Wilmington, Del.-Henry C. Conrad.

HUNTING AND FOOTBALL ACCIDENTS IN 1907.

Killed. Injured. ..71

81 Football

Killed. Injured. .11 98

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