The American Gardeners's Assistant

Forside

Inni boken

Hva folk mener - Skriv en omtale

Vi har ikke funnet noen omtaler på noen av de vanlige stedene.

Utvalgte sider

Andre utgaver - Vis alle

Vanlige uttrykk og setninger

Populære avsnitt

Side 136 - ... condition, as almost to insure a good crop of barley and a kind plant of clover, and that this clover is found a most excellent preparative for wheat, it will appear that the subsequent advantages derived from a crop of turnips must infinitely exceed its estimated value as fodder for cattle.
Side 25 - OBSERVATIONS ON THE DISEASES, DEFECTS, AND INJURIES, | IN ALL KINDS OF FRUIT AND FOREST TREES." WITH AN ACCOUNT OF | A PARTICULAR METHOD OF CURE, | PUBLISHED BY ORDER OF GOVERNMENT.
Side 9 - Awake : the morning shines, and the fresh field Calls us ; we lose the prime, to mark how spring Our tended plants, how blows the citron grove. What drops the myrrh, and what the balmy reed, How Nature paints her colours, how the bee Sits on the bloom, extracting liquid sweet.
Side 28 - It seems that cross fertilisation will not take place at all, or very rarely, between different species, unless these species are nearly related to each other ; and that the offspring of the two distinct species is itself sterile, or if it possesses the power of multiplying itself by seed, its progeny returns back to the state of one or other of its parents.
Side 7 - Leonowens. — THE ENGLISH GOVERNESS AT THE SIAMESE COURT being Recollections of six years in the Royal Palace at Bangkok. By ANNA HARRIETTE LEONOWENS.
Side 136 - Researches,' estimated the value of the turnip crop annually grown in this country at fourteen millions ; but when we further recollect that it enables the agriculturist to reclaim and cultivate land which, without its aid, would remain in a hopeless state of natural barrenness ; that it leaves the land...
Side 20 - GRAFTING. Grafting is the taking a shoot from one tree and inserting it into another in such a manner that both may unite closely and become one tree. These shoots are called scions or grafts, and in the choice of them and the mode of preparing some descriptions of stocks, the following hints...
Side 10 - Nor is the violet last in this shining embassy of the year which with all the embellishments that would grace...
Side 21 - ... formed ; perfect success is the more certain when this is the case. The scion is now to be carefully inserted, so that the inner bark of the scion and of the stock may both exactly meet. Large stocks require two scions, one on each side ; sometimes four are inserted.
Side 27 - In sowing seeds for the purpose of procuring improved varieties, care should be had not only that the seeds be taken from the finest existing kinds, but also that the most handsome, the largest, and the most perfectly ripened specimens should be those that supply the seed. A seedling plant will always partake more or less of the character of its parent, the qualities of which are concentrated in the embryo when it has arrived at full maturity. How this concentration takes place, we are as ignorant...

Bibliografisk informasjon