The Black Arrow

Forside
1st World Publishing, 2004 - 340 sider
Purchase one of 1st World Library's Classic Books and help support our free internet library of downloadable eBooks. Visit us online at www.1stWorldLibrary.ORG - - No one but myself knows what I have suffered, nor what my books have gained, by your unsleeping watchfulness and admirable pertinacity. And now here is a volume that goes into the world and lacks your imprimatur: a strange thing in our joint lives; and the reason of it stranger still! I have watched with interest, with pain, and at length with amusement, your unavailing attempts to peruse The Black Arrow; and I think I should lack humour indeed, if I let the occasion slip and did not place your name in the fly-leaf of the only book of mine that you have never read--and never will read. That others may display more constancy is still my hope. The tale was written years ago for a particular audience and (I may say) in rivalry with a particular author; I think I should do well to name him, Mr. Alfred R. Phillips. It was not without its reward at the time. I could not, indeed, displace Mr. Phillips from his well-won priority; but in the eyes of readers who thought less than nothing of Treasure Island, The Black Arrow was supposed to mark a clear advance. Those who read volumes and those who read story papers belong to different worlds. The verdict on Treasure Island was reversed in the other court; I wonder, will it be the same with its successor?
 

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Innhold

AT THE SIGN OF THE SUN IN KETTLEY
29
IN THE FEN
41
THE FEN FERRY
49
A GREENWOOD COMPANY
59
BLOODY AS THE HUNTER
69
TO THE DAYS END
80
THE HOODED FACE
89
DICK ASKS QUESTIONS
103
THE GOOD HOPE concluded
196
THE DISGUISE
203
THE DEN
205
IN MINE ENEMIES HOUSE
215
THE DEAD SPY
227
IN THE ABBEY CHURCH
237
EARL RISINGHAM
249
ARBLASTER AGAIN
254

THE TWO OATHS
114
THE ROOM OVER THE CHAPEL
124
THE PASSAGE
134
HOW DICK CHANGED SIDES
140
THE HOUSE BY THE SHORE
153
A SKIRMISH IN THE DARK
163
ST BRIDES CROSS
172
THE GOOD HOPE
177
THE GOOD HOPE continued
188
THE SHRILL TRUMPET
269
THE BATTLE OF SHOREBY
279
THE BATTLE OF SHOREBY Concluded
288
THE SACK OF SHOREBY
294
NIGHT IN THE WOODS ALICIA RISINGHAM
307
NIGHT IN THE WOODS concluded DICK AND JOAN
317
DICKS REVENGE
329
CONCLUSION
335
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Om forfatteren (2004)

Novelist, poet, and essayist Robert Louis Stevenson was born in Edinburgh, Scotland. A sickly child, Stevenson was an invalid for part of his childhood and remained in ill health throughout his life. He began studying engineering at Edinburgh University but soon switched to law. His true inclination, however, was for writing. For several years after completing his studies, Stevenson traveled on the Continent, gathering ideas for his writing. His Inland Voyage (1878) and Travels with a Donkey (1878) describe some of his experiences there. A variety of essays and short stories followed, most of which were published in magazines. It was with the publication of Treasure Island in 1883, however, that Stevenson achieved wide recognition and fame. This was followed by his most successful adventure story, Kidnapped, which appeared in 1886. With stories such as Treasure Island and Kidnapped, Stevenson revived Daniel Defoe's novel of romantic adventure, adding to it psychological analysis. While these stories and others, such as David Balfour and The Master of Ballantrae (1889), are stories of adventure, they are at the same time fine studies of character. The Master of Ballantrae, in particular, is a study of evil character, and this study is taken even further in The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1886). In 1887 Stevenson and his wife, Fanny, went to the United States, first to the health spas of Saranac Lake, New York, and then on to the West Coast. From there they set out for the South Seas in 1889. Except for one trip to Sidney, Australia, Stevenson spent the remainder of his life on the island of Samoa with his devoted wife and stepson. While there he wrote The Wrecker (1892), Island Nights Entertainments (1893), and Catriona (1893), a sequel to Kidnapped. He also worked on St. Ives and The Weir of Hermiston, which many consider to be his masterpiece. He died suddenly of apoplexy, leaving both of these works unfinished. Both were published posthumously; St. Ives was completed by Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch, and The Weir of Hermiston was published unfinished. Stevenson was buried on Samoa, an island he had come to love very much. Although Stevenson's novels are perhaps more accomplished, his short stories are also vivid and memorable. All show his power of invention, his command of the macabre and the eerie, and the psychological depth of his characterization.

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