The diplomacy of the United States: being an account of the foreign relations of the country, from the first treaty with France, in 1778, to the present time, Volum 1

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Wells and Lilly, 1828
 

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Side 479 - Europe has a set of primary interests which to us have none or a very remote relation. Hence she must be engaged in frequent controversies, the causes of which are essentially foreign to our concerns. Hence, therefore, it must be unwise in us to implicate ourselves by artificial ties in the ordinary vicissitudes of her politics or the ordinary combinations and collisions of her friendships or enmities.
Side 87 - Parties, that the Inhabitants of the said United States shall have forever, in common with the Subjects of His Britannic Majesty, the Liberty to take Fish of every kind on that part of the Southern Coast of Newfoundland which extends from Cape Ray to the Rameau Islands, on the Western and Northern Coast of Newfoundland, from the said Cape Ray to the Quirpon Islands, on the shores of the Magdalen Islands, and also on the Coasts, Bays, Harbours, and Creeks from Mount Joly on the Southern Coast of Labrador,...
Side 456 - The citizens of each of the contracting parties shall have power to dispose of their personal goods within the jurisdiction of the other, by sale, donation, testament or otherwise...
Side 457 - ... to trade with the same liberty and security from the places , ports and havens of those who are enemies of both, or either party, without any opposition or disturbance whatsoever; not only directly from the places of the enemy before mentioned , to neutral places , but also from one place belonging to an enemy , to another place belonging to an enemy , whether they be under the jurisdiction of one power, or under several.
Side 112 - President of the United States of America, have caused the said Convention to be made public, to the end that the same and every clause and article thereof may be observed and fulfilled with good faith by the United States and the citizens thereof.
Side 88 - American fishermen shall be admitted to enter such bays or harbours, for the purpose of shelter and of repairing damages therein, of purchasing wood, and of obtaining water, and for no other purpose whatever. But they shall be under such restrictions as may be necessary to prevent their taking, drying, or curing fish therein, or in any other manner whatever abusing the privileges hereby reserved to . them.
Side 463 - ... exported or re-exported, in the vessels of the other country. And the same bounties, duties and drawbacks shall be allowed and collected whether such exportation or reexportation be made in vessels of the United States or of Denmark.
Side 137 - But, if the source of the Arkansas River shall be found to fall north or south of latitude 42, then the line shall run from the said source due south or north, as the case may be, till it meets the said parallel of latitude 42, and thence, along the said parallel, to the South Sea...
Side 136 - Sabine, in the sea, continuing north along the western bank of that river, to the 32d degree of latitude ; thence, by a line due north, to the degree of latitude where it strikes the Rio Roxo of Natchitoches, or Red river ; then, following the course of the Rio Roxo westward, to the degree of longitude 100 west from London...
Side 459 - And whereas it frequently happens that vessels sail for a port or place belonging to an enemy, without knowing that the same is...

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