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When Cynthia lights, wi' silver ray,
The weary shearer's hameward way ;
Thro' yellow waving fields we'll stray,
And talk o' love, my dearie O.

Lassie wi', &C.

And when the howling wintry blast
Disturbs my lassie's midnight rest;
Enclasped to my faithfu' breast,

I'll comfort thee, my dearie O.

Lassie wi' the lint-white locks,

Bonnie lassie, artless lassie,
Wilt thou wi' me tent the flocks,

Wilt thou be my dearić' O ?

O LASSIE, ART THOU SEEEPING YET.

Tune_“ Let me in this ae night.0, lassie, art thou sleeping yet,

Or art thou wakin, I would wit?
For love has bound me, hand and foot,

And I would fain be in, jo.

CHORUS

O let me in this ae night,

This ae, ae, ae night;
For pity's sake this ae night,

Orise and let me in, jo.
Thou hear'st the winter wind and weet,
Nae star blinks thro' the driving sleet ;
Tak pity on my weary feet,
And shield me frae the rain, jo.

O let me in, &c.

The hitter blast that round me blaws
Unheeded howls, unheeded fa's ;
The cauldness o' thy heart's the cause
Of a' my grief and pain, jo.

O let me in, &c.

HER ANSWER.
O tell na me o' wind and rain,
Upbraid na me wi' cauld disdain,
Gae back the gate ye cam again,

I winna let you in, jo.

CHORUS.

I tell you now this ae night,

This ae, ae, ae night ;
And ance for a' this ae night,

I winna let you in, jo.
The snellest blast, at mirkest hours,
That round the pathless wand'rer pours,
Is nocht to what poor she endures
That's trusted faithless man, jo.

I tell you now, &c. The sweetest flower that deck'd the mead, Now trodden like the vilest weed ; Let simple maid the lesson read, The weird may be her ain, jo.

I tell you now, &C. The oird that charm’d his summer day, Is now the cruel fowler's prey ; Let witless, trusting woman say.

How aft her fate's the same, jo.

ROY'S WIFE OF ALDIVALLOCH.*
Roy's wife of Aldivalloch,

Roy's wife of Aldivalloch,
Wat ye how she cheated me

As I came o'er the braes of Balloch.
She vow'd, she swore she wad be mine,

She said she lo'ed me best of ony,
But oh ! the fickle, faithless quean,
She's ta'en the carle and left her Johnny.

Roy's wife, &c.
O she was a canty queen,

And weel could dance a highland walloch ;
How happy I, had she been mine,
Or I'd been Roy of Aldivalloch:

Roy's wife, &c.
Her face sae fair, her enn sae clear,

Her wee bit mon' sae sweet and bonny,
To me she ever will dear,
Though she's forever left her Johnny.

Roy's wife, &c.

THE GIRL OF MY HEART. I HAVE parks, I have grounds, I have deer, I have

hounds, And for sporting, a neat little cottage ; I have youth, I have wealth, I have strength, I have

health,
Yet I mope like a beau in his dotage.
What can I want, but the girl of my heart,

To share those treasures with me;
For had I the wealth which the Indies impart,

No pleasure would it give me,
Without the lovely girl of my heart, &c.

* Aldivalloch, sounded Aldivalloh.

My domain far extends, and sustains social friends

Who make music divinely enchanting ;
We have balls, we have plays, we have routs pub-

lic days,
And yet still I feel something a wanting :
What should it be but the girl of my heart,
To share those

e treasures with me :
And had I the wealth which the Indies impart,

No pleasure would it give me, Without the lovely girl of my heart, &c.

2

EVELEEN'S BOWER.
Oh, weep for the hour,

When to Eveleen's bower
The lord of the valley with false vows came;

* The moon hid her light

From the heavens that night, And wept behind the clouds o'er the maidens' shame.

The clouds past soon

From the chaste cold moon,
And heaven smil'd again with her vestal flame ;

But none will see the day

When the clouds shall pass away, Which that dark hour left upon Eveleen's fame.

The white snow lay

On the narrow path-way. Where the lord of the valley cross'd over the moor;

And many a deep print

On the white snow's tint,
Show'd the track of his footstep to Éveleen's door.

The next sun's ray
Soon melted away

Ev'ry trace on the path where the false lord came;

But there's a light above

Which alone can remove That stain upon the snow of fair Eveleen's fame.

SANDY AND JENNY.. COME, come, bonny Lassie, cried Sandy, awa', Whilst mither is spinning, and father's afa', The folks are at work, and the bairns are at play, And we will be married, dear Jenny, to-day. Stay, stay, bonny Laddie, then cried I with speed, I wo'na, I ma'na, go with you indeed; Besides should I do so, what would the folks say, So we canna marry, dear Sandy to-day. List, list, bonny Lassie, and mind what you do, For Peggy and Patty I gave up for you ; Besides, a full twelve-month we've trified away, And one or the other I'll marry to-day. Fie, fie, bonny Laddie, then cried I again, For Peggy you kiss'd t'other day on the plain; Besides a new ribbon does Patty display, And we canna marry, dear Sandy to-day. O, then, a good-by, bonnie Lassie cried he, For Peggy and Patty are waiting for me; The kirk is hard by, and the bell calls away, And Peggy or Patty I'll marry to-day. Stay, stay, bonny Laddie, cried I with a smile, For know I was jesting, indeed, all the while ; Let Peggy go spin, and send Patty away, And we will be married, dear Sandy, to-day.

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