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upon your consideration, the importance of laboring for its still greater improvement. Let no parent or guardian fail to do all he can to increase the facilities, for those committed to his care, to acquire as thorough an education as this system can afford them. Their own happiness, the respectability of their children and the good of their country, demand it. But few, comparatively, of the rising generation, can enjoy the advantages of our higher seminaries. Let our Common Schools, then, be elevated ;-let the higher branches of mathematics, and, at least, some elementary work on both natural and moral philosophy and history, be introduced and taught; and, especially, let every scholar not only be allowed, but absolutely required, to attend to English grammar. * * It is to be regretted, that so many parents appear to be satisfied with their children's education, if they can read and explain the simple columns of the family almanac, write well enough to koep an account book, and kuow enough about arithmetic to cast interest on a note !

And what can a parent do for his children, that will be so beneficial to them, as to give them a good education ? Better, far better, at his death, to leave them poor, but well educated, than to leave thein rich, but ignorant.

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SCHOOL COMMITTEE-EBENEZER PERKINS, Isaac P. Willis, Timothy CLARK.

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RUTLAND,

(1) Population, 1,265. Valuation, $371,141 83.

Number of Public Schools, 11. (2) No. of Scholars of all ages in all the Schools-In Summer, 256-In Winter, 368. (3) Average attendance in the Schools In Summer, 204-In Winter, 265. (4) No. of persons between 4 and 16 years of age in the town, 323.-No. of persons under 4

years of age who attend School, :-No. over 16 years of age who attend School, (5) Aggregate length of the Schools, 49 mths. 11 days --In Summer, 21-11 Winter, 28 11. (6) No. of Teachers in Summer-M.-F.9.--No. of Teachers in Winter-M.5~F. 6. (7) Average wages paid per month including board To Males, $25 33--To Females, $11 72. (8) Average value of board per month-Of Males, $6 87–Or Females, $5 82. (9) Average wages per month exclusive of board--Of Males, $18 46-Of Females, $5 90. (10) Amount of money raised by taxes for the support of Schools, including only the wages of

Teachers, board and fuel, $800. (11) Amount of board and fuel, if any, contributed for Public Schools, $34. (12) No. of incorporated Academies, .-Aggregate of months kept, :-Average No. of

Scholars, :-Aggregate paid for tuition, $ (13) No. of unincorporated Academies, Private Schools, and Schools kept to prolong Common

Schools, .-Aggregate of months kept, .- Average No. of Scholars, .-Aggre

gate paid for tuition, $24. (14) Amount of Local Funds, $ .-Income from same, $

Books USED- -Spelling-Franklin Primer, Cummings'. Reading-Bible, Popular Reader, Rhetorical Reader, Improved Reader, General Class Book, First do., Political Class Book. Grammar-Pond's Murray's, Smith's. Geography-Smith's, Olney's, Woodbridge's and Parley's. Arithmetic-Smith's, Colburn's, Adams' and Emerson's. All others—Constitution of Massachusetts and United States, Comstock's Natural Philosophy, Abercrombie's Mental do., Webster's Dictionary.

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SELECTIONS FROM REPORT. The school committee are bappy in stating, that the schools are now in a better condition than they have been for many years past; and, with one exception, they have been highly gratified with the industry, devotedness, and ability of the instructers, and with the improvement and correct behavior of the pupils. There are some evils, however, which they would notice, and respectfully ask for their speedy removal. * **

The cornmittee would suggest, that all the schoolhouses be appraised and owned by the town, and the town be newly districted in as equal divisions as possible, and the money raised be divided equally among the several districts. And here the committee would again urge, upon the town, the importance of remodeling the internal structure of all our schoolhouses, of having the seats and desks so constructed, as not to put the pupil in pain, and endanger his health, and so arranged, that but two scholars, at most, and it would be better if but one, should occupy a desk, and all be on on side of the school, fronting the instructer. Too much pains cannot be taken to make the school-room pleasant, so as to induce the scholars to view it as a place to be wholly devoted to the purpose for which it was constructed, and as never to be used as playground. It might be so constructed, and so furnished, that a pupil would no more be disposed to be noisy and rude in a school-room, than he would in a gentleman's parlor. *

Hardly a greater calamity can befall a school, than to have it broken up, in the midst of the term, on account of the dissatisfaction and disorderly conduct of the pupils. It is the universal observation of able and tried instructers, that most of the difficulties in our schools arise from a disposition, on the part of parents, a disposition inwoven into the very nature of the human constitution, to hear and favor the complaints of their children. It is a fact worthy of notice too, that, in those districts, in which parents show, most unequivocally, a determination to protect and sustain the instructer, every thing goes on harmoniously, and the improvement made in the schools is the most rapid and the most thorough. Still, your committee are sensible, that much is depending on the instructer, and know, if he has not the faculty of commanding respect, no committee or parents can support him; so, on the other hand, they know, that the combined influence of parents, and the unreasonable prejudices of children, may weaken and crush the energies of the most able and devoted teachers. Hence, no effectual and happy revolution can be produced in our schools, till parents become alarmed, not merely on account of the almost useless expenditure of money, but on account of the destructive habits, and impure associations formed by our children in our Common Schools ; till they are willing to make a combined exertion, and great individual sacrifice, for the purpose of making their schoolhouses what they ought to be, and of obtaining the best qualified instructers. When these objects are once gained, let the parents show, by frequently visiting the school, and by making the instructer an inmate in their families, a determination to respect and support him, and to esteem him for his work's sake. The children will treat him with reverence, and cheerfully submit to his regulations. The reformation in our schools, so desirable, and now so fondly anticipated, must begin with par

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And here the committee will presume to present their views of a good teacher. It is not enough, that the instructer should be a little in advance of his pupils. The rudiments of education cannot be well taught, correct habits early inculcated, accuracy and certainty in every step of his progress in his pursuit of knowledge, be acquired by the child, unless the teacher be a general scholar. In English grammar and arithmetic, for instance, it is not sufficient that the teacher can parse every word according to rule, and accurately perform every arithmetical question. In the former case, he must understand the philosophy of language, the structure and harmony of sentences, the nature and the use of particles. In the latter case, he must not only be able to solve the most difficult questions, but so to demonstrate and analyze them, as to make them plain and familiar to the pupil. *

The historical, classical and scriptural allusions must be so well understood, and be so happily elucidated, as to render the reading lesson the tnost popular exercise in the school. For, the highest acquisition and certainly the most rare, is the art of reading intelligibly and gracefully. This alone requires, not only general knowledge, and a thorough acquaintance with the English language, with the various kinds of poetry, and with the principles of rhetoric, but a nice ear, the power of modulating the voice to the sense, and a highly cultivated and refined taste.

But, while scholarship of a high order is indispensable, there are other traits of character not so striking, but as necessary to ensure success. The instructer

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should have a keen sense of propriety of conduct, a purity of morals, and a dignity of deportment, which ever command respect, and such as every parent would wish his children to imitate. He should have a delicate consciousness of his respectability, and take a deep interest in the moral and religious culture of the minds of his pupils. He should act on the enlightened and'enlarged views, that it is the harmonious education of all the faculties of body and mind, that will bring man up to his destined rank in the scale of being. His heart must be in the work, and he must so bind the pupils to himself by kindness, as to make them eager to meet him in the morning, and as to dispose them to part from him with reluctance at night, and as to make the school-room one of the most delightful spots on earth; so that, in after-life, they will look back upon this interesting period with pure and pleasing associations. Such a teacher cannot fail so to manage his school, as to make it resemble a lovely family, or a little well regulated republic. Let a teacher of the above qualifications be obtained, even at almost any price, and your money would be profitably expended, and more would be gained by your schools in one month, than what they gain in three months by ordinary teachers.

TI committee have dwelt thus long upon this part of their report, for the purpose of showing the responsibility that rests upon the prudential committees. They obtain and contract with the instructers, and the town's committee frequently can know nothing about them, except what they learn from their examination. And in this they may appear well, when destitute of many things essential to fit one to be a good instructer. They would suggest the importance of the prudential and town's committees acting in concert, and that no teacher shall be engaged without good evidence, obtained from the community in which he last resided, of his qualifications, and that the examination of all the teachers shall be at least a number of days previous to the commencement of the school ; so that an opportunity may be given to make all necessary inquiries. *

SCHOOL COMMITTEE.—Josiah CLARK, Rufus Putnam, Edwin HENRY.

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SOUTHBOROUGH,

(1) Population, 1,113. Valuation, $236,633 00.

Number of Public Schools, 6. (2) No. of Scholars of all ages in all the Schools-In Summer, 218-In Winter, 337. (3) Average attendance in the Schools-In Summer, 166—In Winter, 256. (4) No. of persons between 4 and 16 years of age in the town, 273.—No. of persons under 4 years

of

age who attend School, 21.–No. over 16 years of age who attend School, 41. (5) Aggregate length of the Schools, 38 mths. 3 days.-In Summer, 22 1-In Winter, 16 2. (6) No. of 'Teachers in Summer—M. -F.6.-No. of Teachers in Winter—M. 6-F. (7) Average wages paid per month including board—To Males, $2977–To Females, $13 83. (8) Average value of board per month-of Males, $9 25–Of Females, $600. (9) Average wages per month exclusive of board-Of Males, $20 50—of Females, $6 33. (10) Amount of money raised by taxes for the support of Schools, including only the wages of

Teachers, board and fuel, $700 00. (11) Amount of board and fuel, if any, contributed for Public Schools, $ (12) No. of incorporated Academies, -Aggregate of months kept, -Average No. of

Scholars, .-Aggregate paid for tuition, $ (13) No. of unincorporated Academies, Private Schools, and Schools kept to prolong Common

Schools, .-Aggregate of months kept, -Average No. of Scholars, .-Aggre

gate paid for tuition, $ (14) Amount of Local Funds, $ .-Income from same, $

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Books USED.-Spelling National. Reading-Pierpont's Series of Reading Books. Grammar-Smith's. Geography-Smith's, Olney's and Peter Parley's small. Arithmetic-Smith's, Adams' and Greenleaf's. All others-Political Class Book, Analytical Vocabulary, Watts on the Mind, Goodrich's History of the U. S., Parley's Child's Book of the Bible.

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SELECTION FROM REPORT. As far as they (the committee) can judge, the money has been well expended, and the schools have made reputable progress.

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SCHOOL COMMITTEE.-A. Samson, J. CUMMINGS, WM. H. LORD.

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) Population, 1,740. Valuation, $314,312 00.

SOUTHBRIDGE,

(1) (4) No. of persons between 4 and 16 years of age in the town,

500. (10) Amount of money raised by taxes for the support of Schools, including only the wages of

Teachers, board and fuel, $800.

REMARK.—No return is made, except of the number of persons between 4 and 16 years of age and the amount of money raised by taxes for the support of schools.

No REPORT from School Committee.

SCHOOL COMMITTEE.-BELA TIFFANY, John M. SMITH, A. M. CHENEY.

SPENCER, .

S(1) Population, 2,085. Valuation, $391,959 00.

Number of Public Schools, 10. (2) No. of Scholars of all ages in all the Schools—In Summer, 340—In Winter, 477. (3) Average attendance in the Schools—In Summer, 283—In Winter, 383. (4) No. of persons between 4 and 16 years of age in the town, 426.—No. of persons under 4

years of age who attend School, 26.-No. over 16 years of age who attend School, 45. (5). Aggregate length of the Schools, 50 mths. 8 days.-In Summer, 25 15 In Winter, 24 21. (6) No. of Teachers in Summer-M. -F. 9.-No. of Teachers in Winter-M. 7-F. 2. (7) Average wages paid per month including board_To Males, $23 54—To Females, $ 10 72. (8) Average value of board per mouth-Of Males, $701Of Females, $5 16. (9) Average wages per month exclusive of board-Of Males, $16 50_Of Females, $566. (10) Amount of money raised by taxes for the support of Schools, including only the wages of

Teachers, board and fuel, $700. (11) Amount of board and fuel, if any, contributed for Public Schools, $59. (12) No. of incorporated Academies, -Aggregate of months kept, :-Average No. of

Scholars, .-Aggregale paid for tuition, $ (13) No. of unincorporated Academies, Private Schools, and Schools kept to prolong Common

Schools, 4.-Aggregate of months kept, 11.-Average No. of Scholars, 184.-Aggre

gale paid for tuition, $399 50. (14) Amount of Local Funds, $433 00.-Income from same, $26 00.

BOOKS USED.

1.-Spelling-Cummings' and Webster's. Reading Rhetorical and Improved Readers, Testameni, American First Class Book, Worcester's 2 and 3d Books, General Class Book, lutelligent Reader. Grunmur-Pond's Murray's, Smith's. Geography-Olney's, Smith's, Parley's. Arithmetic Adams, Smith's, Colburu's and Parley's. All others-Walls on the Mud, Blake's Philosophy, Goodrich's History.

REMARK.— The amount of funds differs materially from that of last year ; but the return is followed.

No REPORT from School Committee.

SCHOOL COMMITTEE.-LEVI PACKARD, WALTER SIBLEY.

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STERLING,

§ (1) Population, 1,650. Valuation, $411,748 75.

Number of Public Schools, 10. (2) No. of Scholars of all ages in all the Schools-In Summer, 374—In Winter, 486. (3) Average attendance in the Schools In Summer, 293—In Winter, 383. (4) No. of persons between 4 and 16 years of age in the town, 442.—No. of persons under 4

years of age who attend School, 34.–No. over 16 years of age who attend School, 61. (5) Aggregate length of the Schools, 47 mihs. 2 days.-In Summer, 23 18—In Winter, 23 12. (6) No. of Teachers in Summer—M. –F. 11.—No. of Teachers in Winter-M. 10–F. 1. (7) Average wages paid per month, including board—To Males, $28 90—To Females, $11 36. (8) Average value of board per month-of Males, $8 50_Of Females, $6 27. (9) Average wages per month, exclusive of board-Of Males, $20 40Of Females, $5 09. (10) Amount of money raised by taxes for the support of Schools, including only the wages of

Teachers, board and fuel, $1,000. (11) Amount of board and fuel, if any, contributed for Public Schools, $ (12) No. of incorporated Academies, .-Aggregate of months kept, :-Average number of

Scholars, .-Aggregate paid for tuition, $ (13) No. of unincorporated Academies, Private Schools, and Schools kept to prolong Common

Schools, :-Aggregate of months kept, :-Average No. of Scholars, .-Aggre.

gate paid for tuition, $100. (14) Amount of Local Funds, $

-Income from same,

$

BOOKS USED -SpellingCummings'. Reading_Popular Lessons, Mount Vernon Reader, National and Rhetorical Readers. Grammar-Smith's. Geography Smith's, Adams' and Colburu's. All others-Goodrich's History, Comstock's Philosophy.

REMARK.-One hundred dollars contributed for prolonging Common Schools, and for Private Schools, but no other particulars are given.

No REPORT from School Committee.

SCHOOL COMMITTEE.-R. S. Pope, Geo. WATERS, P. T. KENDALL, TORREY HOUGHTON, GILBERT H. HOWE.

STURBRIDGE, {m

(1) Population, 2,004. Valuation, $461,710 00.

Number of Public Schools, i3. (2) No. of Scholars of all ages in all the Schools-In Summer, 403—In Winter, 562. (3) Average attendance in the Schools-In Summer, 317-In Winter, 454. (4) No. of persons between 4 and 16 years of age in the town, 535.-No. of persons under 4 years

of
age

who attend School, 32.—No. over 16 years of age who attend School, 58. (5) Aggregate length of the Schools, 63 mihs. 11 days.-In Summer, 30 26-In Winter, 32 13. (6) No. of Teachers in Summer-M. -F. 13.—No. of Teachers in Winter-M. 10_F. 4. (7) Average wages paid per month including board—To Males, $23 88—To Females, $ 12 05. (8) Average value of board per month—Of Males, $7 03—Of Females, $5 85. (9) Average wages per month exclusive of board—Of Males, $16 85—Of Females, $6 20. (10) Amount of money raised by taxes for the support of Schools, including only the wages of

Teachers, board and fuel, $800. (11) Amount of board and fuel, if any, contributed for Public Schools, $287 21. (12) No. of incorporated Academies, -Aggregate of months kept, -Average No. of

Scholars, :-Aggregate paid for tuition, $ (13) No. of unincorporated Acadmies, Private Schools, and Schools kept to prolong Common

Schools, 5.-Aggregate of months kept, 12.-Average No. of Scholars, 168.-Aggre

gale paid for tuition, $207. (14) Amount of Local Funds, $ .-Income from same, $

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