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SCHOOL COMMITTEE.-ISRAEL G. Rose, SYLVANUS CLAPP, ALBERT NICHOLS.

CUMMINGTON,. "")

S (1) Population, 1,204. Valuation, $217,149 38.

Number of Public Schools, 10. (2) No. of Scholars of all ages in all the Schools—In Summer, 297-In Winter, 370. (3) Average attendance in the Schools-In Summer, 214-In Winter, 268. (4) No. of persons between 4 and 16 years of age in the town, 334.–No. of persons under 4

years of age who attend School, :—No. over 16 years of age who attend School, (5) Aggregate length of the Schools, 69 mths.-In Summer, 37 14-In Winter, 31 14. (6) No. of Teachers in Summer-M. -F. 10.-No. of Teachers in Winter—M. 5–F. 5. (7) Average wages paid per month including board— To Males, $21 90—To Females, $12 47. (8) Average value of board per month Of Males, 00_Of Fe

les, $600. (9) Average wages per month exclusive of board-Of Males, $15 90—Of Females, $6 47. (10) Amount of money raised by taxes for the support of Schools, including only the wages of

Teachers, board and fuel, $500. (11) Amount of board and fuel, if any, contributed for Public Schools, $399. (12) No. of incorporated Academies, .-Aggregate of months kept, -Average number of

Scholars, .-Aggregate paid for tuition, $ (13) No. of unincorporated Academies, Private Schools, and Schools kept to prolong Common

Schools, :-Aggregate of months kept, -Average No. of Scholars, ..-Aggre.

gate paid for tuition, $ (14) Amount of Local Funds, $ .-Income from same, $

BOOKS USED.- -Spelling-Webster's. Reading-Pierpont's and Angell's Series. Grammar -Smith's. Geography Huntington's, Olney's, Malte-Brun's and Woodbridge's Arithmetic -Smith's, Adams' and Colburn's. All others—Newman's Rhetoric, Comstock's Philosophy.

REMARK.—“The net income of the Surplus Revenue, amounting to about $160, was appropriated—making the whole sum expended, including the amount contributed for board and $43 53 received from the State, one thousand and ninety-nine dollars."

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SELECTION FROM REPORT.

All the schools are furnished with blackboards, the only apparatus in any. Moral suasion, in general, has succeeded in sustaining good order in the schools, and parents and teachers favor this mode of government. Non-intercourse with the pupils, in schools as small as ours, should be rigidly maintained, and intercourse only be had between teachers and pupils. All the studies, in point of time, should be systematized. A daily lesson, in biblical reading, and for one lesson on Saturday afternoon, the ten commandments, Exodus, 20th chapter, is recommended.

SCHOOL COMMITTEE.-JAMES W. Briggs, NATHAN Orcutt.

EASTHAMPTON,

{(1)
(1) Population, 793. Valuation, $107,048 25.

Number of Public Schools, 6. (2) No. of Scholars of all ages in all the Schools—In Summer, 143—In Winter, 153. (3) Average attendance in the Schools—In Summer, 122-In Winter, 130. (4) No. of persons between 4 and 16 years of age in the town, 190.-No. of persons under 4 years

of

age who attend School, 5.—No. over 16 years of age who attend School, 3. (5) Aggregate length of the Schools, 41 mths. 14 days.-In Summer, 24–In Winter, 17 14. (6) No. of Teachers in Summer-M. -F.6.--No. of Teachers in Winter-M. 1-F. 5. (7) Average wages paid per month, including board To Males, $26 00—To Females, $11 80.

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(8) Average value of board per month-Of Males, $800_Of Females, $6 20. (9) Average wages per month, exclusive of board-Of Males, $18 00–Of Females, 85 60. (10) Amount of money raised by taxes for the support of Schools, including only the wages of

Teachers, board and fuel, $360. (11) Amount of board and fuel, if any, contributed for Public Schools, $207. (12) No. of incorporated Academies, --Aggregate of months kept, -Average number of

Scholars, .-Aggregate paid for tuition, $ (13) No. of unincorporated Academies, Private Schools, and Schools kept to prolong Common

Schools, 1.-Aggregate of months kept, 6.-Average No. of Scholars, 34.-Aggre

gate paid for tuition, $245. (14) Amount of Local Funds,

-Income from same, $

BOOKS USED.-Spelling-Webster's. Reading-Porter's Rhetorical Reader, Angell's Series, Nos. 1, 2, 3 and 4, Testament. Grammar-Smith's. Geogruphy—Olney's Introduction, Olney's and Ailas. Arithmetic-Colburn's, Adams'. All others-Goodrich’s History of the U. S.

REMARK.—“In addition to the select schools, our district schools are prolonged by subscription, generally, both summer and winter.” The particulars are not given.

SELECTIONS FROM REPORT. * Your committee are happy to say, that parents manifest an increasing interest in the prosperity of the schools. The arrangements beretofore made, with respect to the books to be used, have been regarded generally. In one instance, however, a book, not approbated by the committee, has been introduced by a teacher. It is easy to see, that the prosperity of the schools, as well as a regard for economy, requires, that no more books be introduced in this irregular manner.

Your committee would improve the occasion to make some brief suggestions in reference to the interests of our schools generally. There seem to be two general plans of providing means of education for the young in our Commonwealth. One is to furnish, at public expense, the whole amount of instruction which is required, to fit our children for the various avocations, in which they will be likely, ordinarily, to engage. This plan will give to all children, and youth of every condition in life, the same advantages for intellectual improvement, without laying a heavy burden of expense upon the poorer families. The other plan is to furnish, at public expense, a portion of instruction, leaving the balance to be made up by subscription, and select schools. The former system would tend to make the blessings of education more general and equal in a community. The latter will probably afford a higher degree of instruction to a portion of the young. The latter seems to be the established plan in this town. What we wish to say is, that, under this system, the Public Schools must always be in danger, and will suffer neglect. Those families, who are possessed of wealth, or of uncommon zeal for the education of their children, are resolved to afford them the best advantages, and, with that view come to rely on private and select schools, are apt to lose their interest in the Public Schools. Placing not very much reliance on them, they are likely to feel less interested in their prosperity.

This portion of the community lose their interest in the Public Schools. It is easy to see, that the remaining portion of the community must give to our schools their strong and steady support, or they cannot be expected to flourish; and, if our Common and Public Schools do not flourish, the children of poorer families must be deprived of any extensive education, and the community will, in a few years, be divided into two classes, the educated, and the uneducated.

In respect to the most economical method of managing our schools, your committee would also suggest a few thoughts. It is well known, that our winter schools are much more expensive than our summer schools, even though taught by females. The cost of board, which would be willingly contributed by the families in summer, of wood, and of carrying children back and forth, together with the extra wear of clothes, and the exposure of their health, would, in general, exceed the whole expense of the schools in the summer

season. The committee have also observed, that, except in the east school, there are very few scholars, who might not be spared to attend school in summer as well as in winter. In the five schools, excluding the east, the aggregate of scholars, during the past winter, too old to attend a summer school, would not exceed ten or twelve. All others of the older classes, who have attended at all, were sent to the select school." Now the question is respectfully proposed for general consideration, whether it would not be a very essential saving of expense, if the winter session of those schools should be omitted, and the summer session prolonged in the same proportion ? If a school of one month in winter, costs as much as one of two months in summer, would it not be a manifest saving to spend our money in summer schools altogether? The objection, which we foresee, is this,—that there are some, though a few, scholars, in these schools, who cannot attend in the summer, and they must have a winter school or none. We see the force of this objection, but think it may be obviated in some measure. In the first place, if our summer schools could be extended, by this arrangement, to a period of eight or nine months, the result would be, that our children, hereafter, might obtain more education, by the time they are ten years old, than they now do, by the time they are fourteen; so that there would be much less necessity of sending them to school, at the latter age, when their time in summer or winter is worth many times as much, as it is when they are small children; and then, still further, to obviate the objection, perhaps the larger scholars, in all these districts, might be brought together in one winter school; which would be quite as profitable to them as the present arrangement, and at considerably less expense. We offer these suggestions, pot as prescribing any definite arrangement, but with a view, that an investigation may be made, and in the hope, that the best and most economical method may be discovered, of furnishing our children with that thorough education, which may make them useful citizens, intelligently seeking their own and others' welfare, ornaments to society, and an honor to their native

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SCHOOL COMMITTEE.-ATHERTON CLARK, Edwin HANNUM, WM. BEMENT.

{(1) Population, 2,058. Valuation

, $192,083 00.

ENFIELD, (2) No. of Scholars of all ages in all the Schools-In Summer, 215—In Winter, 259. (3) Average attendance in the Schools-In Summer, 183—In Winter, 221. (4) No. of persons between 4 and 16 years of age in the town, 320.–No. of persons under 4

years of age who attend School, 12.–No. over 16 years of age who attend School, 15. (5) Aggregate length of the Schools, 51 mths.-In Summer, 29—In Winter, 22. (6) No. of Teachers in Summer—M. –F. 8.—No. of Teachers in Winter-M. 5–F. 2 (7) Average wages paid per month, including board—To Males, $25 14—To Females, $7 37. (8) Average value of board per month-Of Males, $7 14Of Females, $5 75. (9) Average wages per month, exclusive of board of Males, $1800_Of Females, $1 62. (10) Amount of money raised by taxes for the support of Schools, including only the wages of

Teachers, board and fuel, $600. (11) Amount of board and fuel, if any, contributed for Public Schools, $ (12) No. of incorporated Academies, -Aggregate of months kept, .-Average number of

Scholars, .-Aggregate paid for tuition, $ (13) No. of unincorporated Academies, Private Schools, and Schools kept to prolong Common

Schools, 2.-Aggregate of months kept, 77.--Average No. of Scholars, .-Aggre

gate paid for tuition, $ (14) Amount of Local Funds, $ -Income from same, $

Books USED.-Spelling-Webster's. Reading—New Testament, National Reader, Improved Reader, Rhetorical Reader. Grammar-Webster's and Smith’s. Geography-Olney's, Malte-Brun's, Woodbridge's. Arithmetic-Smith's, Colburn's, Adams'. All others Philosophy, Algebra.

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SELECTIONS FROM REPORT. In all the schools, there has been a general and punctual attendance of the scholars. The committee, however, are of opinion, that improvements may still be made. In all the districts, there is more or less neglect, on the part of parents, in visiting the schools. In the opinion of your committee, frequent visits have a great effect on scholars. There is, also, another fault in all our schools. Too many studies are crowded upon the mind of the scholar at the same time. We all see the folly of that, in the ordinary business of life. We never expect a man, engaged in a great variety of business at the same time, to do any of it thoroughly, and with a masterly hand. And we say of him, that, with so many irons in the fire, some will burn.

The elementary parts of an education, such as reading and spelling, are too quickly and superficially passed over, for the higher branches, and scholars too often leave school, with a smattering of almost everything, and a thorough knowledge of nothing. Although in this respect, some improvement has taken place, yet much remains to be done. There is also a present deficiency of books. But this, in a great measure, is owing to the fact, that all have been waiting for a uniform list of books, throughout the State, and we hope soon to see such a list, as we fully believe it would be of great practical utility. *

Your committee would further observe, that more difficulty has arisen, for the want of good government in schools, than on any other account. And that more pains should be taken to procure teachers, having the skill to govern a school suitably, than has been taken heretofore.

They would also again say, what was said by them the last year, in regard to the use of the New Testament. It is too little read in Common Schools. Aside from those great principles of morality and religion, which are there to be found, its language is, in general, simple and pure. The sentences are short, and, as a book of common reading, it may be put into the hands of the young reader, with greater benefit in learning to read, than any other book with which we are acquainted. And we ask, can that book, which is, or ought, to be the future guide of our rising generation, be read too young or too thoroughly?

SCHOOL COMMITTEE.-John WhitON, EPAPHRAS CLARK.

GOSHEN,

(1) Population, 460. Valuation, $113,679 00.

Number of Public Schools, 5. (2) No. of Scholars of all ages in all the Schools In Summer, 125—In Winter, 166. (3) Average attendance in the Schools—In Summer, 98-In Winter, 109. (4) No. of persons between 4 and 16 years of age in the town, 150.-No. of persons under 4

years of age who attend School, 10.–No. over 16 years of age who attend School, 34. (5) Aggregate length of the Schools, 29 mths. 21 days—In Summer, 16—In Winter, 13 21. (6) No. of Teachers in Summer-M.0-F.5.-No. of Teachers in Winter-M. 4-F. 1. (7) Average wages paid per month, including board-To Males, $21 50—To Females, $11 20. (8) Average value of board per month-of Males, $8 00–0f Females, $600. (9) Average wages per month, exclusive of board-Of Males, $13 50—of Females, $5 20. (10) Amount of money raised by taxes for the support of Schools, including only the wages of

Teachers, board and fuel, $300. (11) Amount of board and fuel, if any, contributed for Public Schools, $172. (12) No. of incorporated Academies, Aggregate of months kept, .- Average number of

Scholars, .-Aggregate paid for tuition, $ (13) No. of unincorporated Academies, Private Schools, and Schools kept to prolong Common

Schools, 2.-Aggregate of months kept, 4.-Average No. of Scholars, 58.- Aggre

gate paid for tuition, $96. (14) Amount of Local Funds, $

.-Income from same, $ BOOKS USED- -Spelling-Webster's Elementary. Reading-Rhetorical, National and Intelligent Readers, Child's Guide, Easy Primer. Grammar-Pond's Murray's. Geography--Ol.

ney's, Peter Parley's and Brinsmade's. Arithmetic-Adams' and Colburn's First Lessons. All others--Goodrich's History of the U. S., Parley's Histories, Day's and Colburn's Algebra, Euclid, Sullivan's Political Class Book.

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REMARK.—“ The Private School was kept by a college graduate. Instructation was given with particular reference to the qualification of teachers." SELECTIONS FROM REPORT.

In the west school, a teacher was employed, and commenced four weeks previous to being examined, and the examination not being satisfactory, the school was stopped. We would here remark, that the committee and teacher, are placed in very unpleasant circumstances, by such a course. If the teacher have tact, she may get the confidence and good will of the scholars, and with the little knowledge parents generally have, of the affairs of the school, (except by report,) they may think the school prosperous. Hence, if a certificate is refused, bad feelings are excited, the ardor of the scholars is damped, and the discipline of the school permanently injured. Another teacher has been employed in this school, and it is now doing well.

Next to the ability and faithfulness of the teachers, and the efficiency of the several committees, the improvement of our schools depends upon the interest manifested in them, by parents, guardians, and the community at large. If parents would occasionally call at the school, so that there would be no week but some one or more were present, your committee think the good effect would soon be visible, in the greater improvement, and better discipline, of the school. It would also have a good effect upon the teacher, by exciting to greater faithfulness.

The subject of school libraries is deserving attention Many of our youth grow up without a taste for reading, because suitable and interesting books are not to be obtained. If young persons acquire a taste for substantial reading, there is little danger that they will stroll from home, and spend their evenings in bad company; and would it not afford parents much pleasure, to see their sons and daughters gathered around their own firesides, listening to an interesting narrative or biography, rather than the consciousness that they were whiling away their time in the bar-room, drinking, smoking, and acquiring other loaferish habits.

There is one other subject, to which your committee beg leave to direct your attention. It is one which they deein of very great importance, to the interests of education, in this place. The subject in question, has reference to the present mode of educating our youth, by distributing the public money among the several districts. Your committee are fully convinced, that upon the present plan, there is a great loss of means ; that the benefit derived from our money so expended, is very much less than it would be, were a different disposi. tion made of it. Some of our districts are so small, that the schools are very short. Nor is there the interest awakened among scholars, that we might ex. pect, were they longer. To illustrate this :-a teacher is employed, say for $15 per month; he teaches 15 scholars. Now he could quite as well, and even better,-easier to himself,-teach double that number, and the school would make greater proficiency. In sustaining two schools, each containing 15 or 20 scholars, there is a dead loss of more than the expense of one of them. If the two schools could be brought together, the scholars could enjoy the privileges of a school twice the length of time they now do, and would make more than twice the proficiency in their studies, without any additional expense. There is another objection to our present system. It brings together, in our winter schools, those of different ages from three to twenty years, All who have taught school, and others who reflect a moment, must perceive, that, by this arrangement, the operations of a school are very much embarrassed, and its progress greatly retarded.

The younger inembers engross so much of the time of the teacher, that he cannot render that assistance, to older members, he otherwise might. The real progress of small scholars, in winter schools, is universally expected to be small. If the truth were known, probably many a little child has been sent to school in winter, there to engross much of the teacher's time and attention,

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