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Instead of establishing such an institution in our own State at an expense so disproportionate to the cost of instruction elsewhere, your committee would recommend to the Legislature the propriety of appropriating for the present such a sum of money from the Treasury of the State as will be sufficient to educate all the indigent mutes in the State, between the ages of twelve and twenty years at the Institution at Hartford, the one in Philadelphia, or such other, elsewhere established, as the interest of the State and of the beneficiaries of its bounty may require. From documents before them, the committee would estimate the probable number of mutes to be educated by the donation of the State at twenty-five, and the annual expense at one hundred and fifty dollars. An objection may probably present itself, growing out of the extreme reluctance of parents and children to separation by so great a distance; but your committee feel assured, that on no other plan which can immediately be adopted, would the funds of the State be productive of so much benefit to this class of its citizens, so eminently entitled to her liberal donations. Your committee would therefore repectfully submit for adoption the following resolutions :

1. Resolved, That the sum of three thousand dollars be, and it is hereby appropriated for the education of the indigent deaf and dumb of this State between the ages of twelve and twenty years, in such manner as the General Assembly may deem best calculated to effect the benevolent object of the appropriation : and that the foregoing appropriation be inserted in the appropriation bill.

2. Resolved, That our Senators and Representatives in Congress be requested to make every effort for the purpose of procuring for each State a township of the public land, or such other quantity as they may be able to obtain, with a view of creating a fund in each State, the interest of which shall be appropriated to the education of the indigent deaf and dumb, and that his Excellency the Governor be requested to forward to our Senators, and to each of our Representatives and Representatives elect in Congress, a copy of these resolutions.

3. Resolved, That this State will appropriate the sum of ten thousand dollars, so soon as two or more of her neighbouring States will co-operate with her, and contribute in a ratio proportioned to the number of their free white inhabitants, for the purpose of endowing a Southern Institution for the education of the deaf and dumb, to be located at such place and organized in such manner as may hereafter be determined on when such proposition is adopted ; and that bis Excellency the Governor be requested to forward to the Executive of such of the neighbouring States as may be deemed most likely, from their situation, to unite with this State in such an establishment, copies of this report and resolutions, with a request that they be submitted to their respective Legislatures at their next session for their consideration.

Agreed to, 10th Dec. 1834.

JACOB WOOD,

President of the Senate.

Attest-JOHN A. CUTHBERT, Secretary.

In the House of Representatives,

Concurred in, Dec. 19th, 1834.

THOMAS GLASCOCK,
Speaker of the House of Representatives.

Attest-JOSEPH STURGIS, Clerk.

Approved, Dec. 20th, 1834.

WILSON LUMPKIN, Governor,

IN SENATE.

The military committee to whom were referred the reports of the military store-keepers at Savannah and Milledgeville, beg leave to report :

-That they have carefully examined the arsenal and magazine, in the care of Mr. John H. Currie, at this place, and have much pleasure in stating that they found them in good order. Mr. Currie has with much labour cleaned all the arms, and put them in good order for service, except four hundred and twenty-five muskets, which require the services of a gunsmith. The boxes containing the arms have been placed by him on stands with the tops off, so that they can be easily inspected, or given out for service.' There

being no racks to place them on, this is the best arrangement that could be adopted.

The report of Mr. Stone, the military store-keeper at Sa. vannah, says nothing of the state of the arms in the arsenal ; at that arsenal your committee, however, observe, that there is a deficiency of cartridge-boxes, and other equipments. This is the case here, and is a matter which in their opinion ought to be reinedied by the purchase of such articles as may be necessary to give as many full sets of equipments as there are muskets and rifles in the arsenals; and they therefore recommend the adoption of the following resolution :

Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives, That his Excellency the Governor be, and he is hereby authorized and required to purchase as many cartridge-boxes, and other articles of military equipment, as shall be necessary to make up as many full sets as there are muskets and rifles in the arsenals at Milledgeville and Savannah ; and also, that he employ a gunsmith to repair the muskets and rifles in the arsenal at this place.

Resolved, Further, that the Governor is hereby authorized and required to appoint three fit and proper persons to examine the arsenals at Savannah and Augusta, who shall report to him the state of the arms in those arsenals.

Read and agreed to, Dec. 2d, 1834.

JACOB WOOD,

President of the Senate.

Attest-JOHN A. CUTHBERT, Secretary.

In the House of Representatives,

Concurred in, Dec. 18th, 1834.

THOMAS GLASCOCK,
Speaker of the House of Representatives.

Attest-JOSEPH STURGIS, Clerk.

Approved, Dec. 20th, 1834.

WILSON LUMPKIN, Governor.

IN SENATE.

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Whereas, by the act of the General Assembly of the State of Georgia providing for the improvement of the public roads, rivers, &c., directed that accounts created by the superintendents of the several sections of the State, for provisions for the support and materials, &c. furnished for the support of the public hands, and performing of the work assigned to them, required that such accounts should be presented to the said superintendents for their approval and payment by those having such claims.

And whereas, there is yet outstanding accounts which, from neglect or want of knowledge of the provisions of the law requiring that they should have been presented to the said superintendents while in office, which are correct, and ought to be paid, many of which have been presented to his Excellency the Governor for payment

Be it therefore resolved, That his Excellency the Governor be, and he is hereby authorized and required to draw his warrant on the Treasurer for the payment of such claims as may be presented to him: Provided, such accounts are considered just, and in terms of the law, to be paid out of the contingent fund, provided the fund heretofore set apart for such purposes has been exhausted.

Agreed to, 7th Nov. 1834.

JACOB WOOD,

President of the Senate.

Attest-John A. CUTHBERT, Secretary.

In the House of Representatives,

Concurred in, 10th November, 1834.

THOMAS GLASCOCK,
Speaker of the House of Representatives.

ATTEST-JOSEPH STURGIS, Clerk.

Approved, November 14th, 1834.

WILSON LUMPKIN, Governor.

IN SENATE.

The standing committee to whom was referred so much of the Governor's message as relates to internal improvement, from the nature of the subject committed to it, feels bound at this early stage of the session to call the attention of the Leg. islature to an investigation of, and determination on, those measures which shall be proper to give to the good citizens of this State the necessary facilities to a market for their products and for their supplies.

The state of Georgia has a large extent of territory, with a climate so diversified that she can, if need be, produce, not only the great staples of the south, but also all such necessaries, comforts, and luxuries as may make her wholly independent of the world beside for any of them. In one section, sea island cotton, the most valuable in the world, and rice, are the natural products of the soil and climate. In another, cotton of an inferior quality, but in far greater quantities, is grown; in another, grain is more congenial ; and in all, the growth of the whole world may with a little care be naturalized. The lands of the seaboard are worked so profitably in the growth of rice and sea island cotton, to which they are so peculiarly adapted, that the section in which they lie can better afford to buy its supplies of grain, meat, &c., than to produce them; and unable to draw these supplies from the interior of the State from the want of a means of conveyance, thousands and hundreds of thousands are paid to the grain growing countries of the north for those supplies, which in the interior, for the want of a market, are rotting in the hands of the grower. In the interior, short staple cotton is made in abundance, and would be a mine of wealth to the planter, but that he must incur an expense of at least ten per cent. in getting it to market. Grain of all sorts is also grown in the interior in quantities more than is necessary to supply the wants of the seaboard, but the grower is paralyzed by the difficulty of getting this article to market. Indian corn, the great article of food in the low country, and of which not less than 300,000 bushels are annually imported into the city of Savannah alone from the north, at an outlay of $200,000, can be and will be grown in the interior in quantities sufficient for this supply, whenever it can be made an article of profit to the grower ; and this can be done by giving him a means of conveyance,

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