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train of miseries which render life to me a burden. He lies full low, gored with wounds, and festering in his own blood. But he lies in peace. He feels none of the miseries which rend my soul with agony and distraction, while I am set up a spectacle to all mankind of the uncertainty of human affairs. So far from having it in my power to revenge his death, I am not master of the means of securing my own life. So far from be: ing in a condition to defend my kingdom from the violence of the usurper, I am chliged to apply for foreign protection for my own person. Fathers | Senators of Rome ! the arbiters of the world !—to you I fly for refuge from the murderous fury of Jugurtha.-By your affection for your children, by your love for your country, by your own virtues, by the majesty of the Roman commonwealth, by all that is sacred, and all that is dear to you—deliver a wretched prince from undeserved, unprovoked injury; and save the kingdom of Numidia, which is your own property, from being the prey of violence, usurpation, and cruelty.

2X. Speech of Canuleius to the Consul i in which he demands that the Plebeians may be admitted into the Consulship, and that the Law prohibiting Patricians and Plečcians from intermarrying may be repealed.

WHAT an insult upon us is this ' If we are not so rich as the Patricians, are we not citizens of Rome as well as they inhabitants of the fame country mem. ...bers of the same community The nations bordering upon Rome, and evet strangers more remote, are admit. red, not only to marriages with us, but to what is of much greater importance, the freedom of the city. Are we, because we are commoners, to be worse treated than ftrangers —And, when we demand that the people may be free to bestow their offices and dignities on whom they please, do we ask any thing unreasonable or new: Do we claim more than their original inherent right? What occasion, then, for all this uproar, as if the universe were falling to ruin They were just going to lay violent

hands upon me in the senate-house. What I must this empire, then, be unavoidably overtarned;

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Patricians, is the sovereign power in the people of Rome, .

or in you ? I hope you will allow, that the people can, at their pleasure, either make a law or repeal one. And

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der them from giving their suffrages, by leading them:

into the field 2

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ple cut of the city, I declare, as tribune, that this peo-

ple, who have already so often spilt their blood in our. country’s cause, are again ready to arm for its defence. and its glory, if they may be reflored to their natural

rights, and you will no longer treat us like strangers in

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for imperious lords, with whom he can neither share the dignities of the state, nor in private life have any alliance'

by marriage.
X. Speech of junius Brutus over the dead Body of

Lucretia.

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is come. Tarquin is not at Rome. The Patricians are .

at the head of the enterprise. The city is abundantly

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only cowards, when they are to deliver themselves from .

army which Tarquin now commands. The soldiers, you

slavery —Some of you are perhaps intimidated by the

imagine,

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