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AN OFFICIAL JOURNAL

OF THE
BOARD OF EDUCATION

BOARD OF ADVISERS
CHAS. L. SPAIN, Editor

C. C. CERTAIN, Managing Editor
EDITORIAL BOARD
Edwin L. MILLER, Principal, Northern High School
S. A. Courtis, Director of Instruction, Teacher Training, and Research
ETHEL PERRIN, Assistant Director of Health Education
MABEL LEVENS, Condon Intermediate School
MABEL WOODWARD, Western High School

CORRESPONDENTS

To be announced

CONTENTS FOR DECEMBER, 1920

Volume I

Number 1

PAGE

The Functions of the State University

MARION LEROY BURTON.

3

Detroit's Inlerinediate-School Program

CHAS. L. SPAIN

18

Teaching by the Project Method

WILLIAM H. KILPATRICK

29

Analysis of High-School Subjects

CHARLES H. JUDD

37

The Size of High-School Classes

HOMER W. ANDERSON

41

High-School Standards for Promotion in English Composition

C. C. CERTAIN...

46:

Tentative Standards in Typewriting

E. G. BLACKSTONE...

53

Visual Teaching

J. H. WILSON...

57

Editorials

59

Educational Movements and Experiments:

.61

The Movement for Better American Speech--Claudia Crumpton

New Course in Banking

Detroit School Interests and Activities.....

64

An Open Letter-Edwin L. Miller

The Reorganization of the Detroit Teach ers Association-Leo J. Brueckner

The Detroit Public School Election:

Parts I and II-E. W. McFarland

"Nordstrum Enters Politics"-Vina G. Knowles

The Detroit Mathematics Club

The Detroit English Club:

The Discussion Contests

Book Reviews

76

Cartoon and Prose Rhyme.

BURTON BARNS

The Detroit Journal of Education is published bi-monthly from September to June by the Detroit

Board of Education. It is edited under the auspices of the office of the Superintendent of Schools.

An executive committee, consisting, of the Editor, Managing Editor, and three members of the Board

of Advisers, is in charge of the publication.

The circulation includes all Detroit high-school a nd intermediate-school teachers and principals, the

principals of all elementary schools, the supervisors of the school system, and a limited number of city

school superintendents, public libraries, and educational publications throughout the United States.

Address all communications to the Managing Editor, C. C. Certain, Northwestern High School
Detroit, Michigan.

[graphic]

FRONT ELEVATION OF STANDARDIZED INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL BUILDING

FOR 1,800 FUPILS

See "Detroit's Intermediate School Program.” page 18

The Detroit Journal of Education

VOL. 1

DECEMBER, 1920

NO. 1

THE FUNCTION OF THE STATE UNIVERSITY

An Address Delivered by

MARION LEROY BURTON
On the Occasion of his Inauguration as President of the University of Michigan

October 14, 1920

THE

HE University of Michigan has a the problem, defy definition. Even so, it notable history.

Its past is the is our privilege, upon occasions such as occasion of just pride in the heart of every this, to ask ourselves anew just what we citizen of the state. The name of Presi- are attempting to do. Specifically, what dent James Burrill Angell is a synonym do we conceive to be the function of the for educational statesmanship in Amer- state university? I venture to answer ica. The university today, its faculties that the function of the state university and students, its buildings, and campus, is to serve the state and through the state give ample proof of the wise, and saga- to serve the nation and the world. cious leadership of President Hutchins This assertion requires of us, first, to during the last decade. Since 1837, this

make some appraisal, though necessarily university has filled a vital place in incomplete, of the state; secondly, to atAmerican education. For a generation its primacy among the state universities versity; and, finally, to suggest some

tempt some critical estimate of the uniof our country was conceded. That sev

forms of service which the university eral highly important educational devel

should render to the state. opments were initiated here is obvious

I. to all who are familiar with the history of higher learning in America.

Any complete appraisal here of the This university was founded and has State of Michigan is quite impossible. We been maintained by the state of Miclrigan. can, however, recognize certain considerIt therefore owes primary obligations to ations which are pertinent to our discusthis state. However large it may be- sion during this conference. come, or however attractive it may prove The external facts

interesting to students from all quarters of the globe, simply because they serve as the basis it finds its chief satisfaction in serving its for a marvelously beautiful and fascinown constituency. Nevertheless, it shares ating life. Here is a state the same size with all of the colleges and universities

as England and Wales and one-fourth of the land, represented here today, many the size of France, inhabited, according common tasks of higher education. It

to the census just completed, by three counts it a rare honor to be numbered and two-thirds millions of people gathamong these institutions.

ered from every land under the heavThe aims and functions of a true uni

Moreover, this state has the versity, by the very nature and terms of high honor and distinction of being one

are

ens.

--2

And yet

of the integral units of the United States Our country today is suffering from a of America, which must be numbered lack of national unity. This statement among the really great nations of all his- does not need to be supported by statistory. Michigan gives to and receives tical data, graphic charts, or long argufrom every state within the Union. She

ments. We are a polyglot people. We takes her color and quality from the have been gathered from all of the nawhole nation. Strategically located in tions of the earth. These peoples have the very heart of America, within easy come with varying traditions, differing access of many of the chief centers of religious beliefs, and with strange expect. population, proud of possessing the ctions. They have been confronted with fourth city of the nation, conscious of her stern realities rather than thrilling naindustrial power, she may be regarded as tional hopes. They have experienced typically American. To appraise her is chilling disappointments and suffered in reality to interpret America.

from bitter disillusionments. The vital facts are compelling because out of this heterogeneous mass we are they tell us that here may be seen mil- making America. The war revealed in lions of people engaged in agriculture, sharp outline our dangers. Sometimes mining, manufacturing, and commerce. a flash comes out of the dark pit of our They work and they attempt to play. social and economic world. But through They are prosperous, possessing now it all, the war made us see the possibiliabout six billion dollars' worth of prop- ties of a new order and illuminated our erty. They desire to use rightly and rough path with the enduring light which wisely their leisure time. They are asso- emanates from the eternal truths upon ciated, perhaps unconsciously, and with- which Democracy rests. out any serious realization of its implica- The striking fact about America is tions, in the task of community building that more than any other nation she has . They have assumed the responsibilities been released from the past. Here is at of American citizenship. They have de- once her strength and her weakness. veloped here a political, social, industrial, Forward-looking movements in Europe and educational order. Mighty problems are inevitably counterbalanced by the have presented themselves for solution. traditions of the past.

traditions of the past. In America, lib. The city of Detroit alone is spending this crty easily becomes license, and freedom year thirty-one million dollars for her tends toward anarchy. At any rate, the public schools. As we look at Michigan, plasticity of our entire social order is we are thrilled by this heroic community, apparent. Our detachment from the past undaunted by its problems, and inspired has manifested itself in a curious disreby a great vision of its future.

gard even for the laws enacted by ourAmerica as a whole has made great

selves and in a strange disrespect for the contributions to this Middle West. If courts of our own making. With all of our Pilgrim forefathers were marked by our worship of the individual, human life independence, initiative, and moral in- has been held a cheap thing. Arnold sight, these characteristics have been Bennett alludes to "that sublime, romanespecially necessary in the development tic contempt for law and for human life, of these great western empires. Along which, to the European, is the most diswith the nation, the West must face prob- concerting factor in the social evolution lems and utilize opportunities which are of your states.” Our escape from ancient apparent to every observer of American tyrannies and limitations has tended to life.

soften our lives and to rob them of their

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