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TABLE, shewing the Monthly Results of a Meteorological Journal kept at

Nottingham by Dr Clarke.

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January, 53 1735.29 14 30.05 28.65 29.44 1.13 181 13 14 18 9 5

February, 543043.00 14 30.33 28.68 29.62 0.74 18 10 2 3 33 16 March, 6230 44.00 10 30.38 29.00 29.99 0.40 26 5 22 6 9 15 April, 562842.76 13 30.36 28.97 29.73 0.54 13 171 16 1 141 18 May, 1773857.61 9 30.26 29.23 29.84 0.43 | 24 7 10 13 19 13 June, 174 4557.71 18 30.45 29.27 29.84 0.62 21 9| 11 7/ 15 14 July, 784659.64 10 30.12 29.39 29.88 0.24 17 14 24 41 10 18 August, 764860.69 8 29.97 29.23 29.64 0.45 12 19 3 8 31 8 Sept. 72 34 50.46 12 29.87 129.05 29.46 0.63 25 51 2 5 11 17 Oct. 67 3052.00 10 30.25 29.77 30.09 0.38 25 6 13 6 17 41 Nov. 6426 42.10 11 30.41 29.03 29.89 0.77 18 12 12 26 22 Dec. 533340.12 13 30.00 28.25 29.45 0.90 7 14 1 6 23 151

Total

234 131130 79197165

ANNUAL RESULTS.

THERMOMETER.

Wind.
Highest Observation,
July 27th,

BAROMETER.

Wind. Highest Observation,

78°. S. Lowest Observation, Jan. 22d,

17. N. Greatest Variation in 24

hours, June 1st and 2d, 18°.

Annual Mean, 48o. 78.

June 25th, 30.45 N. E.
Lowest Observation,
Dec. 17th,

28.25 W. Greatest Variation in 24

hours, Jan, 30th
and 31st,

1.13
Annual Mean, 29.74

512

TABLE, shewing the Quantity of Rain that fell in different Parts of England and Scotland in the Year 1809.

England.

Scotland,

1809.

June,

2.91 8.44 5.22 3.50 1.57 3.98 2.67 4.66 6.58 0.77 1.80 2.76| 2.085 1.560 1.435 2.121 1.22
Jan.
Feb. 1.86 4.31 3.29 2.59 2.94 2.58 1.96 3.11 4.53

1.69 3.16 3.204 2.865 2.820 4.697 1.25
March, 0.94 0.00 0.44 0.82 0.48 0.43 0.35 0.53 1.13 0.72 0.75 0.21 0.694 0.339 0.360 2.981 0.86

3.46 3.95 1.70 2.10 3.05 2.11 0.96 4.59 2.20 2.30 2.15 2.01 1.240 0.785 0.386 1.751 2.23
April,
May,
0.86) 1.07 1.83 1.59 0.45 2.96 3.42 3.39 3.85

1.80 2.14 2.076 2.935 2.379 2.806 1.44
1.20 2.38 2.06 2.24 | 3.24 2.01 2.45 3.10 4.26 2.45 2.45 3.02 2.525 1.846 2.379 2.956 2.40

3.58 3.45 2.00 2.87 2.38 2.28 1.79 4.00 3.45 1.44 1.44 | 2.39 2.324 1.545 2.245 1.829 2.83 July,

2.64 3.70 4.38 4.53 5.88 4.61 3.85 6.12 7.25 3.75 4.50 5.56 6.502 4.470 5.283 6.298 3.92 Aug.

2.90 3.34 4.13 3.90 3.10 4.29 4.22 4.75 5.57 2.60 3,13 2.94 3.476 2.788 2.825 2.025 2.34 Sept.

0.22 0.60 0.28 0.75 0.56 1.41 0.61 0.87 1.66 0.35 0.31 1.19 0.406 0.950 1.442 2.220 1.21 Oct

1.38 1.30 1.91 1.70 1.90 2.25 2.14 3.87 2.80 1.33 1.18 0.87| 1.445/ 1.175 0.925 2.410 1.67
Nov.

3.00 5.53 2.67 1.79 2.42 2.74 4.68 5.74 7.08 1.84 1.81 3.24 2.575 3.190 3.153 6.535 3.11
Dec.
Total, 24.95 38.07 29.91 28.38 27.9731.65 29.10 41.73 150.36 17.55 23.01 29,4928.552 24.440 25.132 40.624 24.48

GENERAL RESULTS.

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Inchen LONDON, greatest quantity of rain fell in July,.............3.58 CHICHESTER................Ditto.....................January.......8.44 CHATSWORTH, ............Ditto ................... January.......5.22 HORNCASTLE, ...........Ditto......... .August, .......4.53 FERRIBY, ....................Ditto......................

...... August, .......5.88 HEATн, ....................Ditto..........

August, .......4.61 MANCHESTER, ............Ditto........ December, ...4.68 LANCASTER, ..........

.Ditto..........

...August, .......6.12 DALTON,

.................Ditto.............. August, .......7.25 West BRIDGFORD, ......Ditto.........

... August, .......3.75 NottingHAM, ............Ditto.................... August, ......

..4.50 EDINBURGH, ...........

..............Ditto.................. ..August, .......5.56 DALKEITH, ..............Ditto..................... August, ......6.502 BOTHWELL CASTLE, ...Ditto.......... ..August, .......4.470 GLASGOW,

.................Ditto............. ...... August, .......5.283 LARGS, ..................Ditto........

..December, ...6.535 GORDON CASTLE, ......Ditto............... August, .......3.92

VOL. 11. PART II.

2K

SOME ACCOUNT

of an Attempt made by Mr Balman a Hanoverian, and Mr Francis Huger

an American, to liberate M. de la Fayelte from his Confinement in the Castle of Olmutz, 1794.

· [This interesting narrative was drawn up by the writer from personal communica

tions with Mr Huger. We pledge ourselves for its authenticity. The brief ac, count, contained in the Appendix to Segur's History of Frederick William II., is very inaccurate.)

A MONGST the many extraordinary zed as a traitor, and delivered up to characters which the eventful times the Emperor of Germany; who, re. we live in have produced to the no. garding him as one of the chief intice of the world, no man has under struments of the insulting degradagone greater vicissitudes of fortune tion and subsequent death of the royal than La Fayette. At one time we family of France, ordered him into behold him tearing himself from the close confinement in the castle at Ol fascinations of the most lịcentious mutz. Compassion for his fate drew court in Europe, braving the elements petitions from all quarters for his re. in search of the bubble reputation, sease. The emperor was inexorable, and combating for the cause of li- and Fayette had dragged on two miberty under the banners of Washing- serable years in his solitary prison, ton; at another, sowing the seeds when a stranger and a foreigner stepof confusion in his native country, ped forwards from pure motives of idolized by an enthusiastic populace, compassion, and an anxious wish to and raised to the chief command of be of service to a man who had so his emancipated countrymen ; then signalized himself in the cause of liproscribed and hunted by those asso- berty. Balman was a Hanoverian by ciates who no longer stood in need of birth, young, active, intrepid, and inhis assistance ; a fugitive in a foreign telligent. He repaired alone and on land, obliged to seek an asylum foot to Olmutz to gain such inforamongst his enemies; and lastly, seie mation as might enable him to judge of the best means to execute the pur. had been driven on shore by the viopose he had in view, to assist Fayette lence of the wind, and the crew had in making his escape from the power dispersed themselves over the island of Austria. He soon found that, in search of assistance. They wer without an able coadjutor, the diffi- hospitably received, and provided culties which presented themselves with such necessaries as they most were insurmountable. He was for stood in need of. When the stran. ced, therefore, for the present to aban- gers were made acquainted with the don his design until he should be so quality of their host, and his political fortunate as to find a man equally principles, they made themselves and zealous with himself, and with ability the object of their voyage known to sufficient to execute the hazardous him. The one was the Marquis de la plan he had formed. Accident threw Fayette, then about eighteen, and the in his way the person in the world other an elderly gentleman, a Chevabest suited to the enterprize by na- lier de St Louis, who, like another ture and education. Ai Vienna, he Mentor, had followed the fortunes of entered into the society of young the young Telemachus. “They beAmericans, whom he thought most held,” they said, “ with indignation, likely, from their veneration for the the tyranny the inhabitants of North character of Fayette, to dare such an America laboured under from the mo. undertaking. He soon singled out ther country ; and, animated with the one, to whom, after proper precau- true spirit of liberty, they were retions, he imparted his secret. Huger solved to espouse the cause of the Conentered into and adopted his schemes gress, and either partake with them with all the keenness of youth, and the happiness of emancipation, or pethat enthusiastic enterprize peculiar rish with them in the glorious effort.”

" to the inhabitants of the new world. Colonel Huger quiited the island

Francis Huger was the son of Co. with his guests, and, repairing to head lonel Huger of Charlestown, South quarters, introduced them to General Carolina, who lost his life in the ser- Washington, who gave each of them vice of his country against the British a command in the continental army. troops on the walls of the town, when Francis Huger was only four years besieged by General Prevost. The old when this happened, but the adyear before his death, he had retired venture remained deeply impressed to a small island off the Charlestown on his memory; and though he had bar, with his family, for the benefit never seen Fayette since, yet he felt of sea-bathing:—There happened one the greatest attachment to his

person, evening a violent storm, the report and the highest admiration of his acof cannon was heard at a distance; tions ; with ardour, therefore, he concluding the firing came from Bri participated in Balinan's scheme for tish ships, then cruising in those the release of his favourite hero. seas, it was necessary to avoid giving Thus agreed, they began their opesuspicion that the island was inhabit rations. It was necessary to conduct ed." About midnight a knocking at themselves with caution, for the Austhe door of the cottage obliged Co- trian police was vigilant, and particulonel Huger to open it. Two per- larly jealous of strangers. "Huger sons appeared, who, in a foreign ac. pretended ill health, and Balman gave cent, informed him that their ship himself out for a physician, who on

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