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CONTENTS.

OF BENEFITS.

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CHAPTER 1. Of benefits in general,

II. Several sorts of benefits,
III. A son may oblige his father, and a servant his

master,
IV. It is the intention, not the matter, that makes

the benefit, -
V. There must be judgment in a benefit, as well as

matter and intention, and especially in the choice

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of the person,

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VI. The matter of obligations, with its circum

stanoes,
VII. The manner of obliging,
VIII. The difference and value of benefits,
IX. An honest man cannot be outdone in courtesy,
X. The question discussed, whether or not a man

may give or return a benefit to himself,
XI. How far one man may be obliged for a benefit

done to another,
XII. The benefactor must have no by-ends,
XIII. There are many cases wherein a man may be

minded of a benefit, but it is very rarely to be

challenged, and never to be upbraided,
XIV. How far to oblige or requite a bad man,
XV. A general view of the parts and duties of the

benefactor,
XVI. How the receiver ought to behave himself,
XVII. Or Gratitude,

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CHAPTER XVIII. Gratitude mistaken,

XIX. Of ingratitude,
XX. There can be no law against ingratitude,

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OF A HAPPY LIFE.

I. Of a happy life, and wherein it consists,

73 II. Human happiness is founded upon wisdom and virtue; and first, of wisdom,

76 III. There can be no happiness without virtue, 80 IV. Philosophy is the guide of life,

88 V. The force of precepts,

96 VI. No felicity like peace of conscience,

103 VII. A good man can never be miserable, nor a bad man happy,

107 VIII. The due contemplation of the laws of Nature is the certain cure for all misfortunes,

111 IX. Of levity of mind, and other impediments of a happy life,

117 X. He that sets up his rest upon contingencies shall never be at quiet,

123 XI. A sensual life is a miserable life,

128 XII. Avarice and ambition are insatiable and restless,

135 XIII. Hope and fear are the bane of human life, 140 XIV. It is according to the true or false estimate

of things that we are happy or miserable, 144 XV. The blessings of temperance and moderation, 157 XVI. Constancy of mind gives a man reputation and

makes him happy in despite of all misfortunes, 154 XVII. Our happiness depends in a great measure upon the choice of our company,

163 XVIII. The blessings of friendship,

167 XIX. He that would be happy, must take an account of his time,

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CHAPTER XX. Happy is the man that may choose his own

business,
XXI. The contempt of death makes all the miseries

of life easy to us,
XXII. Consolations against death, from the cause

and the necessity of it,
XXIII. Against immoderate sorrow for the death

of friends,
XXIV. Consolations against banishment and bodily

pain,
XXV. Poverty to a wise man is rather a blessing

than a misfortune,

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OF ANGER

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I. Anger described : it is against nature; and only

to be found in man,
II. The rise of anger,
III. Anger may be suppressed,
IV. It is a short madness and deformed vioe,
V. Anger is neither warrantable nor useful,
VI. Anger in general, with the danger and effects

of it,
VII. The ordinary grounds and occasions of

anger,
VIII. Advice in the case of contumely and re-

venge,
IX. Cautions against anger in the matter of educa-

tion, converse, and other general means of pre

venting it, both in ourselves and others,
X. Against rash judgment,
XI. Tako nothing ill from another man, until

you
have made it your own case,
XII. Of cruelty,

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EPISTLES.

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EPISTLE I. Certain general directions for the government of

the voice; as in speaking soft or loud ; quick or

slow. The speech is the index of the mind 276 II. Of styles, compositions, and the choice of words.

That is the best way of writing and speaking which

is free and natural. Advice concerning reading, 278 III. Against all sorts of affectation in discourse :

fantastical studies; impertinent and unprofitable

subtleties. Man's business is virtue, not words, 282 IV. Business, and want of news, are no excuse among

friends for not writing. Wise men are the better
for one another. How far wisdom may be ad-
vanced by precept,

286 V. Seneca gives an account of himself, his studies,

and of his inclinations: with many excellent re-
flections

upon

the duties and the errors of human life,

291 VI. The blessings of a virtuous retirement.

come to the knowledge of virtue. A distinction
between good and honest. A wise man contents
himself with his lot,

297 VII. Of impertinent studies, and impertinent men. Philosophers the best companions,

302 VIII. Against singularity of manners and behavior, 304 IX. The blessings of a vigorous mind in a decayed

body. With some pertinent reflections of Seneca
upon his own age,

306 X. Custom is a great matter either in good or ill. We

should check our passions betimes. Involuntary
motions are invincible,

309 XI. We are divided in ourselves; and confound good

How we

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and evil,

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EPISTLE XII. We are moved at the novelty of things, for

want of understanding the reason of them,
XIII. Every man is the artificer of his own fortune.

Of justice and injustice,
XIV. Of trust in friendship and bodily exercise,
XV. The danger of flattery; and in what cases a

man may be allowed to commend himself,
XVI. A general dissolution of manners; with a cen-

sure of corrupt magistrates,
XVII. The original of all men is the same; and vir-

tue is the only nobility. There is a tenderness

due to servants,
XVIII. Of life and death : of good and evil,
XIX. Of true courage,
XX. It is never too late to learn. The advantages

of a private life; and the slavery of a public.

The ends of punishments,
XXI. The two blessings of life are a sound body

and quiet mind. The extravagance of the Ro-
man luxury; the moderation and simplicity of

former times,
XXII. Man is compounded of soul and body; and

has naturally a civil war within himself. The dif-
ference between a life of virtue and a life of

pleasure,
XXIII. We abuse Nature's blessings, and turn them

into mischiefs. Meditations upon horrors of
earthquakes, and consolations against them. Death
is the same thing, which way soever it comes ;
only we are more moved by accidents that we are

not used to,
XXIV. A discourse of Nature's laws in the misfor-

tunes of good men in this world, and in the pros-
perity of the unrighteous,

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