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THE

IMPROVED;

BEING A NEW

SELECTION OF LESSONS

FOR

READING AND SPEAKING.

DESIGNED FOR THE USE OF SCHOOLS.

BY CALEB BINGHAM, A. M.
Author of the Columbian Orator, Child's Companion, &c.

TRAIN UP A CHILD IN THE WAY HE SHOULD GO."

SIXTY SECOND (IMPROVED EDITION

CINCINNATI, OHIO:
PUBLISHED BY OLIVER FARNSWORTII & CO.

MWILIGE VIBRARY
man TNE LIBRARY OF

Waduk W. BARCHA
PO the SDS

Histrict of Massachusetts, to wit.

DISTRICT CLERK'S OFFICE.

BE

E IT REMEMBERED, that on the thirtieth day of August, A. D. 1819, in the Forty Fourth Year of the Independence of the UNITED

STATES OF AMERICA, C. Bingham & Co. of said District, have deposited in this Office the Title of a Book the Right whereof they claim as Proprietorsin the Words following, to wit: “The American Preceptor Improved, being a new Selection of Lessons for Reading and Speaking. Designed for the use of Schools. By Caleb Bingham, A. M. Author of the Columbian Orator, Child's Companion, &c. "Train up a child in the way he should go.' Sixty-first (First Improved) Edition,"

In conformity to the Act of the Congress of the United States, entitled, “An Act for the encouragement of Learning, by securing the Copies of Maps, Charts and Books, to the Authors and Proprietors of such Copies, during the times therein mentioned:” and also to an Act entitled, "An Act supplementary to an Act entitled, “An Act for the encouragement of Learning, by securing the Copies of Maps, Charts and Books, to the Authors and Proprietors of such Copies, during the times therein mentioned; and extending the benefits thereof to the Arts of Designing, Engraving and Etching Historical, and other Prints."

J. W. DAVIS, Clerk of the District of Massachusetts,

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· PAGE

The Lap Dog

105

Extract from Mr. Dawes' Oration

107

Gen. Washington's Resignation

108

Speech of a Scythian Ambassador

109

The Revenge of a Great Soul

110

Cudjoe, the Faithful African

112

The Indian Chief

113

Dialogue on dress and assurance

114

Speech of Publius Scipio

117

Speech of Hannibal

119

Dr. Belknap's Adólress to the Inhabitants of New Hampshire 120

Quackery. A Dialogue

124

Of the Elephant

127

Speech of Mr. Walpole

129

Mr. Pitt's answer to Mr. Walpole

131

Story of a second Joseph

132

Scene between Cato and Decius

134

The Beggar's Petition

136

The test of Goodness

137

Description of Mount Ætna

138

Dialogue between Two School Boys

140

Extreet from J. Q. Adams's Oration

143

On knowing the World at an early age

145

History of Pocahontas

148

Speech of Caius Marius

151

Fraternal Affection

153

Conveniences not always necessaries

156

T'he Hottentot and the Lion

159

Gustavus Vasa and Christiern

160

Narrative of Four Sailors

163

Pedigree. A Dialogue

167

Description of the falls of Niagara

169

Mcseiali, a sacred Eclogue

173

Narrative of Mrs. Howe's captivity

176

Mr. Pitt's Speech, 1775

185

The Lion

187

Story of the grateful Turk

190

The quarrel of Brutus and Cassius

198

Speech of Demosthenes

201

Judge Hale's advice to his children

203

Brutus' Speech on the Death of Cæsar

206

209

Antony's Speech over the body of Cæsar

Polla and Alonzo

212

Gen. Wolfe's address to his army

214

Foscari, the unfortunate Venitian

215

Cicero's Oration against Verres

219

History of William Tell

220

The field of Battle

223

Insincerity in conversation

224

The Yankee in England

HISTORY OF THE ORATOR DEMOSTHENES.

DEMO

EMOSTHENES, having lost his father at the

age of seven years, and falling into the hands of selfish and avaricious guardians, who were wholly bent upon plundering his estate, was not educated with the care which so excellent a genius as his deserved, and the delicacy of his constitution did not allow his masters to urge him in regard to his studies.

2. Hearing them one day speak of a famous cause that was to be pleaded, and which made a great noise in the city, he importuned them very much to carry him with them to the bar in order to hear the pleadings. The Orator was heard with great attention, and having been very successful, was conducted home in a very ceremonious manner, amidst a crowd of illustrious citizens, who expressed the highest satisfaction.

3. Demosthenes was strongly affected with the honors which were paid to the Orator, and still more with the absolote and despotic power which eloquence had over the mind. He himself was sensible of its force and unable to resist its charms, he from that day devoted himself entirely to it, and immediately laid aside every other pleasure and

study.

4. His first essay of eloquence was against his guardians, whom he obliged to restore part of his fortime. Encouraged by this good success, he ventured to speak before the people, but he acquitted himself very ill on that occasion, for he had a faint yrice, stammered in his speech, and had a very short breath,

5. He therefore was hissed by the whole audience, and': went home quite dejected, and determined to abandon for ever a profession to which be imagined himself unequal: But one of his hearers, who perceived air excellent genius amidst his faults, encouraged him, by the strong remonstrances he made, the salutary advice he gave him. He 1*

therefore

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