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" Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world Like a Colossus ; and we petty men Walk under his huge legs, and peep about To find ourselves dishonourable graves. Men at some time are masters of their fates : The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars,... "
The Plays of William Shakespeare: With the Corrections and Illustrations of ... - Side 14
av William Shakespeare - 1809
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The Social Life of Emotions

Larissa Z. Tiedens, Colin Wayne Leach, Keith Oatley - 2004 - 360 sider
...Cassius, a literary prototype of the envying person, as he protests the honors being heaped on Caesar: Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world Like a Colossus, and we petty men Walk under his huge legs and peep about To find ourselves dishonorable graves. (Shakespeare, 1599/1934, p. 41) These words...
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Middlemarch: A Study of Provincial Life

George Eliot - 2004 - 744 sider
...224 BCE. There is an echo here of Shakespeare's Julius Caesar (1623), Act 1, Scene 2, lines 133-35: "Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world/ Like a Colossus, and we petty men/ Walk under his huge legs, and peep about/ To find ourselves dishonorable graves." Controlled bleeding and raising of blisters,...
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Take the Rich Off Welfare

Mark Zepezauer - 2004 - 183 sider
...Two: Big Business Breaks FOOP STAMPS Tax Avoidance by Transnationals ($137.2 billion a year) UUhy. man, he doth bestride the narrow world like a colossus, and • •we petty men walk under his huge legs, and peep about to find ourselves dishonorable graves."1 Cassius's description of Caesar is hard...
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Shakespeare's Early Tragedies

Nicholas Brooke - 2005 - 232 sider
...again on the shouts off-stage - and Cassius completes his peroration with a superbly grotesque image: Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world Like a Colossus, and we petty men Walk under his huge legs, and peep about To find ourselves dishonourable graves. (133-6) The movement from the Marlowan...
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The Problem Plays of Shakespeare: A Study of Julius Caesar, Measure for ...

Ernest Schanzer - 2005 - 196 sider
...Caesar's greatness dwarfs his own achievements, and makes it impossible for him to gain glory and renown. Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world Like a Colossus, and we petty men Walk under his huge legs, and peep about To find ourselves dishonourable graves. (1.2.135-8) 'Honour', a word which occupies...
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Julius Caesar

William Shakespeare - 2005 - 239 sider
...shout! I do believe that these applauses are 140 For some new honors that are heaped on Caesar. CASSIUS Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world Like a Colossus, and we petty men Walk under his huge legs and peep about To find ourselves dishonorable graves. 145 Men at some time are masters of their...
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Exploring 1 & 2 Thessalonians: An Expository Commentary

John Phillips - 2005 - 240 sider
...the plot to murder Julius Caesar, Shakespeare has Cassius complain to Brutus, Caesar's close friend: Why man, he doth bestride the narrow world Like a Colossus, and we petty men Walk under his huge legs, and peep about To find ourselves dishonorable graves. But Caesar, as ambitious as he was, was...
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In The Footsteps of Churchill

Richard Holmes - 2009 - 376 sider
...the Americans.8 The words Shakespeare put in the mouth of thoroughly modern Cassius spring to mind: Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world, Like a Colossus ; and we petty men Walk under his huge legs, and peep about To find ourselves dishonourable graves. Men at some time are masters of their...
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Shakespeare: The Golfer's Companion

Syd Pritchard - 2005 - 147 sider
...achieve greatness, And some have greatness thrust upon 'em. [Twelfth Night II v 130] Captain titanic Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world Like a colossus, And we petty men walk under his huge legs And peep about Tojind ourselves dishonourable graves. [Julius Caesar I ii 1 34] Captain pretentious...
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The Best-loved Plays of Shakespeare

Jennifer Mulherin, William Shakespeare, Abigail Frost - 2004 - 160 sider
...warning and dismisses the fortune teller. 'He is a dreamer; let us leave him; pass.' Caesar's ambition Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world Like a Colossus; and we petty men Walk under his huge legs, and peep about To find ourselves dishonourable graves. Act i Sc ii As the procession moves on,...
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